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Would Dr. Martin Luther King be happy with society if he were alive?

  1. profile image57
    LDelvaposted 5 years ago

    The other day I read an article about an assault on a white male who was walking in Georgia with his 'African-American' girlfriend. Is discrimination still an issue in the 21st Century? I find this to be very sad. People should be able to date whomever they please regardless of their race. Too many lives have been lost. It would be a shame to say that Dr. Martin Luther King and all the other nobles marched in vain. Such a shame. Can we step away from the color of our skins and see each other equally? Society has evolved far too greatly to step back into the trenches of discrimination.

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
      Uninvited Writerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I don't know. It seems that some people seem to want to forget that the social movements in the 1960s even happened and want to go back to some idealized idea of the 50s that never existed outside of televisions sitcoms.

      1. profile image57
        LDelvaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Well these people need to get off their couches, chairs, and beds; cut the television off, walk outside their door and realize that we are living in a totally new era!

    2. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No.  He was about economic justice as well as social justice.  He wouldn't be happy at all that we are in such dire straits that 46 million people are on food stamps, and our debt is 16 trillion. 

      Since he was against Vietnam, it's not likely he would've been in favor of Iraq or Afghanistan either.

      1. dianetrotter profile image75
        dianetrotterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        I agree with you Sooner

  2. HowardBThiname profile image88
    HowardBThinameposted 5 years ago

    I think most discrimination against interracial relationships is a thing of the past - at least in the United States.

    Lots of blended families out there and very few seem to care these days.

    I'm not sure MLK would be proud of those who play the race card dishonestly, however. MLK was about truth and equality. He wasn't one to borrow trouble where no trouble was to be had.

    This is an interesting thread.

    1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image87
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      We still have quite a bit of criticism against interracial relationships in parts of Ohio and some other states and when I review films, my agency requires the presence of any such to be noted. A step forward, however, is the non-issue it is in this month's release "The Words" -the interracial couple suffers no discrimination or even any race-related comment. It is very good to see this.

      In a related item, I see a lot of older Baby Boomers here, especially those not working, spending all day in front of the TV. They watch the stations showing 1950s-60s series like the Dick Van Dyke Show, the Andy Griffith Show, the Jack Benny Show, the Donna Reed Show, and others. These individuals might really want to go back to the 1950s-60s, because most tell me they are not even going to vote this year and that nothing can be done to change the economy and other problems. That's pretty depressing.

      1. profile image57
        LDelvaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Yes, I have heard about this movie. I will be sure to watch it. It is very depressing to hear people say that nothing can be done to change the economy. I don't think.that's true. And again to those who sit and watch old sitcoms, turn the channel or cut the television off and get some fresh air! We are no longer living in those days. We have come to far as a society to even have hatred thoughts towards interracial relationships. It is life; something that MLK dreamed of. Both dark and white conversing with each other, loving each other. It is too much of a beautiful thing to want to.go back in the ages.

    2. profile image57
      LDelvaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are totally correct. However, there's always one rotten apple in the bunch. Hopefully, that rotten apple doesn't contaminate the other apples with thoughts of violence against people in interracial relationships. I personally believe the assault occurred in a rage of jealousy. At the end of the day, we the people have to take a stand and not surround ourselves around these 'rotten apples'. Pure ignorance.

  3. profile image60
    chatroomsposted 5 years ago

    Im not too sure how happy he would be with society but i'm pretty sure if he wasn't he would be trying to find ways to improve society.

  4. dianetrotter profile image75
    dianetrotterposted 5 years ago

    Unfortunately, there will always be racists of all ethnicities.  We can minimize their impact for calling it what it is ... racism.  My nephew is attracted to non-African American girls only.  I told him that there is no problem with him dating, and possibly marrying, a non-African American.  My concern is that he is not attracted to African American girls at all. 

    At the heart of racism is the desire/need to feel superior to others.  Heaven is not segregated.  Racism is hatred.  God asked that we love one another.  He did include race in the criterion.

    1. profile image57
      LDelvaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are so right. Everyone wants to be superior to one another. And God did say for everyone to love each other regardless of the color of their skin. As for your son, it wouldn't be the first time I've heard a black man not being interested in dating women of his own race.

    2. HowardBThiname profile image88
      HowardBThinameposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I understand that, Diane, but folks are attracted to different things. Some guys like big breasts, other guys like small breasts. Long hair, short hair. Tall girls, small girls. It just goes on and on. I don't think your nephew is a racist because his attraction is white girls. I think it's a just a preference. My ex-neighbor, a banker, was white and dated only black girls. And he REALLY like black girls much better than white girls. I don't know what causes our preferences, but I like to think that we're all the same underneath.

      1. dianetrotter profile image75
        dianetrotterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        The big breast thing is still a case of prejudice.  Their souldmate could actually be flat as a fried egg but have great character and much to offer.  I do understand the preference but we often miss out on a blessing by excluding options.

  5. BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image84
    BLACKANDGOLDJACKposted 5 years ago

    I believe Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would be very happy we have a black president.

    I also, however, believe he would not be very happy that the wrong black guy is president.

  6. profile image57
    LDelvaposted 5 years ago

    Why do you believe that the president is the 'wrong' black guy? I would love to hear your point of view.

    1. dianetrotter profile image75
      dianetrotterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have mixed emotions about the president.  I'm trying to follow pundit evaluations of campaigns.  I like hearing all sides before making a decision.

  7. SpanStar profile image60
    SpanStarposted 5 years ago

    Unless I'm living in the twilight zone there is significant indication that racial division is still prevalent in the 21st century. Can anyone say: Trayvon & Zimmerman, Blacks attacking White 2012
        http://www.theblaze.com/stories/report- … tate-fair/

    and death by racial hatred

       http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=7db_1344 … omments=1.

    I don't know if people are closing their eyes to the truth but racial hatred is still a significant part of this country. If we have little respect for the ethnic groups in our community why would it be a surprise to have little respect for minority president?

    1. dianetrotter profile image75
      dianetrotterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is the disturbing thing about racism.  When it is undercover, it is hard to fight.

      1. SpanStar profile image60
        SpanStarposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Dianetrotter that is so true.

  8. MayG profile image87
    MayGposted 5 years ago

    I think Dr Martin Luther King would be disappointed with society for many reasons. Yes, at least racism is not as prevalent as it was in his day, but there's so much violence and prejudice for so many different reasons, not just racism.
    At least racist attitudes are considered by the majority to be wrong, even though they do still exist.  I was shocked to read about the case of the African-American couple recently who couldn't be married in the church they wanted to in Mississippi because of some white members of the congregation who objected.  It seems hard to believe it goes on, but obviously it still does.

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I forgot about that story until I read your response.

      Loooooooooooong, long way to go!

    2. dianetrotter profile image75
      dianetrotterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I remember the couple that the pastor married at another location.  Members said they did not know anything about it.  Last I heard, the pastor made a bad decision.

 
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