jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (8 posts)

Green energy policies hurt the poor.

  1. JSChams profile image61
    JSChamsposted 5 years ago
  2. jponiato profile image81
    jponiatoposted 5 years ago

    Gasoline in my area is nearing $4.00 per gallon again, after dipping somewhat since mid-summer.  Meanwhile, let's look at income for the big oil companies.  This is not gross revenue, but actual realized net income (ie; profit):

    BP: over $40 million per day.
    Shell: nearly $66 million per day.
    Exxon-Mobil: over $175 million per day.

    Combined, these 3 companies "earned" over $280 million every day in the 2nd quarter of 2012, while we paid near-record prices for gas, diesel, and fuel oil.  How do you think that impacts the poor?

    1. JSChams profile image61
      JSChamsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Same way it impacts me. But the other ain't helping.

    2. JSChams profile image61
      JSChamsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Lemme give you a little perspective. I used to own a hybrid. Past tense. Honda civic.
      It never got the advertised 50 mpg and I could be driving uphill with my foot on the gas and make that thing light green to the top. Did not matter. I have a Chevy Cobalt that gets better mileage.(33 mpg).
      Then you take the sucker for like an oil change? 70 bucks.
      Uses 0w-20 oil which is only just now becoming available at your local Wal-Mart. Dealer wanted 8 bucks a quart for it. Yeah I recommend the financially challenged get into one of those.

      1. jponiato profile image81
        jponiatoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Well, I opted for a chevy cruze eco, which gets 43 MPG, but all that is beside the point I was making.  Until there are viable options to compete with petroleum-based energy, the big oil companies will keep raking in the profits at our expense.  We need renewable alternatives developed that are cost-effective.

        Having said that, let me go on record as saying that I'm not necessarily in favor of legislatively-enforced innovation.  Expanding the tax breaks to individuals and companies that embrace renewable energy will stimulate the market, which in turn will spur investments and innovation in the sector.

        But, back to the point of the original post - that green energy impacts the poor more than everyone else - I submit that the rising costs of all energy sources hurt the poor the worst, for the exact same reasons put forth in the article.  And that isn't about to change until either the barriers to enter the petroleum markets are eased (ask yourself why, with so much potential profit, there aren't dozens of new companies entering the oil game every day?), or alternative energy sources are prevalent enough to make the oil companies feel the competition.

    3. readytoescape profile image60
      readytoescapeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      And just how much was paid in taxes to state and federal governments? More than what the oil companies earned. Aren’t you aware that Our Government and the oil producing foreign states are where the real money goes. The oil companies do all the work and average 3% to 8 % profits.
      Do you not realize that the Democratic party controlled government wants higher fuel prices?

      Here’s the math:
      Higher prizes = higher tax revenues = more spending = Liberal Progressive Agenda Goals


      Keep drinking the "evil oil companies" Kool aid, your "leaders" are laughing at your Naiveté and gullibility

  3. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "Combined, these 3 companies "earned" over $280 million every day in the 2nd quarter of 2012," - like they would be really interested in alternatives to that kind of dough. Spain has a compressed air car; ever heard of it?

  4. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    "The United States federal excise tax on gasoline is 18.4 cents per gallon and 24.4 cents per gallon for diesel fuel. On average, as of April 2012, state and local taxes add 30.5 cents to gasoline and 29.4 cents to diesel, for a total US average fuel tax of 48.9 cents per gallon for gas and 53.8 cents per gallon for diesel."

 
working