Bloomie says your rights need to be infringed from time to time.

Jump to Last Post 1-8 of 8 discussions (33 posts)
  1. Barefootfae profile image61
    Barefootfaeposted 8 years ago
    1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
      BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I think he means all the time.

    2. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      He explained it well, in the context that he used.  But it was nothing that every citizens didn't already know.
      But he succeeded in avoiding facing the real issue-----his outright tyranny in the large-soda issue.   He must be a liberal all around, 'cause they learn distraction very easily.

      I wonder if I have the right to say he's a manipulative jerk.    Well, I reckon so.  lol.      I bet he has some rights that need to be infringed upon!

  2. psycheskinner profile image85
    psycheskinnerposted 8 years ago

    However it is true that society infringes freedoms all the time.  Locking people up from criminal acts, taking kids from parents who abuse them etc.

    The question is which freedoms can be restricted for what reasons.

    1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
      BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, thats what he means, good reasons to infringe on our rights like banning a soda of more than 20 ounces.

      The more they speak the more they expose their true intent!

    2. Barefootfae profile image61
      Barefootfaeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Which freedoms do you think should be restricted?

      1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
        BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I doubt you would get an honest response it seems liberals never say what they really want it has to be exposed.

        1. GA Anderson profile image92
          GA Andersonposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Well then, how about a traditionalist's contrary response?

          Bloomberg(sp?) isn't restricting anything. He isn't outlawing anything.

          He's just leading a group that supposedly represents the consensus of their constituents.

          The members of that group were elected by various segments of the societal group that is New York.

          Every societal group has a right to make whatever laws they want, (within constitutional limits of course) as long as those laws are approved by the consensus of the societal group as a whole.

          So, if the group's elected representatives are representing their constituent's interests - then why shouldn't they be allowed to determine the laws that govern their society? If you don't like the rules, either find enough like-minded citizens to change the rules - or get out and find a place more to your liking. Just because a rule/law sounds silly to you doesn't mean it's silly to everyone - as is obvious by his support that got the soda ban passed,

          Sounds nice, and basically it's true.

          But, the reality is that voters usually get what they deserve when their voting decisions are based on popularity contests, or what they hear on the 10pm news, or from their buddy at the bar.

          If the people of New York didn't want their salt and soda intake regulated for them, they would not have voted for the people they did, err... right? That is how it works isn't it?

          But I have to go now. Our city council is voting on a black sock ban for city workers that wear boots to do their job. Seems they make your feet sweat more than white socks, which causes severe foot odor, and can lead to fungal infections - which of course will mean higher medical costs, causing the city health ins. premiums to go up, and more lost work days, and possible disability claims. Everybody agrees this is just a common sense law, right? At least that's what Buddy the bartender says.

          I would ask Bob, but he moved to Appalachia.

          GA

      2. psycheskinner profile image85
        psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I just gave two examples.

        1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
          BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          That the only two?

          1. psycheskinner profile image85
            psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I am not sure why an exhaustive list is necessary to make the point.  Society restricts freedoms.  people who live in society have restricted freedoms.  It is a question of type and degree that separates utopia from tyranny.

            1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
              BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              And when is tyranny tyranny? Locking someone up for actions they did is quite different than telling you what you can have or cant have because we know whats best. What happened to our body our choice? I have a feeling you are ok with Bloomberg restricting a drink size but would have a cow if he infringed on abortion, somehow that would be baaaaaaaad.

              1. Josak profile image61
                Josakposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                On that basis of "our body our choice" I guess you support the immediate legalization of Meth and Crack?
                I don't support the ban btw.

                1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
                  BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  Absolutely I support it, why not?

                  1. Josak profile image61
                    Josakposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                    Cool tongue

  3. innersmiff profile image68
    innersmiffposted 8 years ago

    If we are to accept this we have to take it that the right didn't exist in the first place. One cannot simultaneously argue for the right to life and the right to kill people sometimes. Do we have the right to do as we wish with our own body or not? When thought about rationally there can be no middle ground without putting in place some arbitrary distinction, like the amount of soda in a cup. Say the ban is on drinks over 500ml - what is the moral difference between 499ml and 500ml? There is no difference, so invoking 'rights' in support of the ban is absurd.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      One can indeed argue simultaneously for the right to life and the right to kill people sometimes.   That's common knowledge.

  4. psycheskinner profile image85
    psycheskinnerposted 8 years ago

    I disagree, rights are always conditional.  We do generally speaking have the right to life but it is not an absolute right.  Try stabbing a cop and most people will agree s/he has the right to shoot you dead. And of course several states have the death penalty.  If you have a disease that a really expensive treatment could possibly cure, and no money or insurance, you will probably die. There is a difference between a right and an immutable right.

    1. innersmiff profile image68
      innersmiffposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      They are only conditional so long as one doesn't violate another's rights. A cop shooting someone who has stabbed them is self-defending, as is their right, and the attacker has to accept the consequences of the violation of their right to their body, which may mean death. I personally don't think the death penalty counts, and needs to be abolished.

      And having a right to live doesn't mean that you're impervious. The right to life simply means that you own your life and you and only you has the ultimate responsibility for it, and for making appropriate steps to keep yourself healthy.

      What is the point of having a recognised right in a society if it's going to be infringed basically whenever the state wants?

  5. profile image0
    Brenda Durhamposted 8 years ago

    What is it with so many politicians  anyway?
    Ya give them a little power, and they may do a few good things with it, but then they turn into control freaks.   Or were they just control freaks from the start?

  6. Barefootfae profile image61
    Barefootfaeposted 8 years ago

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/7825391_f248.jpg

  7. Uninvited Writer profile image82
    Uninvited Writerposted 8 years ago

    Yes he's bad because he wants to deny people buying large sugary drinks but those who want to deny people the right to get married even if they are gay are okay?

    1. Barefootfae profile image61
      Barefootfaeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Didn't say that now did I?
      Matter of fact I have stated more than once they can do what they like.

      1. Cody Hodge5 profile image69
        Cody Hodge5posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        So you would be in favor of gay marriage?

      2. Uninvited Writer profile image82
        Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I wasn't specifically referring to you.

      3. psycheskinner profile image85
        psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Except that so long as gay marriage is not legal, actually they can't.

        1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
          BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          That isn't true, homosexuals can be married in several states and the District of Columbia.

    2. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
      BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      So he's ok but they represent tyranny?

  8. habee profile image94
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    I was wondering...can you buy a large DIET soda in NYC?

    1. Cody Hodge5 profile image69
      Cody Hodge5posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I think so....I was watching Morning Joe the day the ban was set to go into effect and they were showing signs at Starbucks saying that customers had to add their own sugar if they got a drink larger than a certain amount.

      So I think you would technically be able to buy anything you want if it didn't have sugar in it.

    2. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
      BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Last I heard a court struck down his ban. I don't know if it was ever started.

      1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
        Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I heard it was voted down too. So... sort of a wasted argument.

        1. BuckyGoldstein profile image60
          BuckyGoldsteinposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I'm not sure its a wasted argument the attempt seems a little bit much to me. I'm glad he removed the (R) next to his name so he could be correctly identified.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)