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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (8 posts)

When does being scolded become a form of harrassment? Or does it?

  1. meow48 profile image74
    meow48posted 6 years ago

    When does being scolded become a form of harrassment?  Or does it?

  2. BJC profile image71
    BJCposted 6 years ago

    When the person being scolded is attacked verbally, by namecalling or being ridiculed,

    1. TomBlalock profile image82
      TomBlalockposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I would have to say that much like the nature of evil, it depends on intent. One can accidentally hit a pedestrian in a car, and be a saint. One can run over someone else and be a murderer. The same applies to scolding >>

  3. TomBlalock profile image82
    TomBlalockposted 6 years ago

    I forgot to actually click answer the question, and commented instead. No wonder there was a word limit. i should stop drinking for tonight.

    I would have to say that much like the nature of evil, it depends on intent. One can accidentally hit a pedestrian in a car, and be a saint. One can run over someone else and be a murderer. The same applies to scolding. If the comments are simply a symptom of the anger inherent in many scoldings for perceived failings, then they simply should be told to moderate their anger. If the words are meant to injure mentally, for the reason that they are hurtful, I'd say its harassment.

    The question is though, was something done to deserve it in the first place? For example, if this is in a workplace, the rules change. In that situation, you have to stop giving excuse for scoldings by being more cautious. If they continue, it most certainly is harassment. Really depends on context if its elsewhere.

  4. ChitrangadaSharan profile image54
    ChitrangadaSharanposted 6 years ago

    Scolding children in public is definitely a form of harassment to them. At the same time it is very important to correct them if they have done something wrong. But that should be done in a non violent way, explaining them the right and the wrong aspects. The effect will be lasting and in the right direction.
    Even children have their self respect and ego as much as their elders and they do not want to be scolded, harassed or humiliated before family, friends or classmates.

  5. profile image0
    Ghostwolfeposted 6 years ago

    In the workplace scolding in front of others is something that happens often. This is a way for the 'boss' to show dominence to the rest of the employees. This is also something that has caused a lot of people ot lose their jobs as it also frowned upon by some businesses.

    I had a job once that they had this center circle where all the 'bosses' sat it was a call center. I remember when they pulled this guy next to me up there to scold him and pretty much degrade and embarass him in front of everyone. The guy came back to his desk with tears in his eyes. Now this was a call center and for anyone who works in a call center you know how the environment can be. A few months later I was being monitored while on a call and told the customer something in the sense that because the credit card that was issued to the person who was a minor and had a mental disability shoudl never have been issued to them and when the lady on the other end asked me what she could do I told her simply to get a lawyer due to the card being issued to the minor who was 17 and the card required you to be 18.

    To cut a long story short when the call ended they called me up there and the supervisor got right in my face it was nose to nose, he told me that I didn't deserve to work there and that he was going to personally make sure that my work life was going to be hell. I put my finger to my lips and told him to shoosh, then asked him if he seen any worry or fear in my eyes, I did tell the man that if he didn't get out of my face that I was going to slap the bald off him. I did say some other things to him and the other bosses that was vulger, I am not sorry about it and never will be, you don't treat me like that.

    Anyways, Scolding if done in the right manner can be used to show someone how they messed up and what they need to do to fix it. Public scolding in the work place is done a lot in private businesses and some corporate structures. The thing is if y ou allow the person scolding you in public to get away with it, you are letting them harrass you and are taking your own will away. If you stand up for yourself and pretty much put them in line before it gets to out of hand than it could be considered an argument and you can still walk away with your dignity.

    Sorry for the long reply.

  6. Vegas Elias profile image35
    Vegas Eliasposted 6 years ago

    I feel no one should ever scold anyone else. When someone scolds he assumes that he is right and the other person is wrong. This may not be the fact.

  7. cabmgmnt profile image85
    cabmgmntposted 6 years ago

    Scolding is harassment when it is done in front of peers with the intent to embarrass. Scolding should be done privately and serious issues need to be resolved at a parent teacher meeting or with the help of a counselor. Scolding as a taunt can be traumatic and lead to inferiority issues.

 
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