Why the middle class and poorer citizens fail to vote alike during Presidential

  1. mackyi profile image65
    mackyiposted 5 years ago

    Why the middle class and poorer citizens fail to vote alike during Presidential elections?

    Why do the middle class and the poorer citizens who of course makeup at least 75% of the U.S. population allow the 25% richer class of people to tell them which candidate to vote for just for the sake of their interest?

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  2. profile image0
    Old Empresarioposted 5 years ago

    They simply aren't informed because they get all of their information from television. Only about 50% of eligible voters votes anyway. It's considered a "landslide win" if a candidate can get close to 30% of the country to vote for him.

  3. d.william profile image61
    d.williamposted 5 years ago

    There are many factors that determine how a person will vote.  The main reason is party loyalty, but people also tend to vote on one issue that is important to them and tend to ignore all other issues.  The other problem is most people tend to ignore the campaign process when the candidates are traveling around the country making promises that they will never keep, making false accusations and insinuations against their opponent, agitating people to vote on religious issues, social issues and other things individuals may be passionate about - then at the presidential debates they lie their asses off to the public when they know that the only exposure to them by most voters is based on those debates.
    Most people believe the lies and pay the consequences after the person is elected into office.
    The worst is the congressional members who do what they want after being elected, or whatever their benefactors want them to do, instead of what is best for the people in general.  This certainly was evident over the past 4 years with all the obstructionism by one party against the other without any consideration for the american people.   Nothing is likely to change in the next 4 years and beyond.

 
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