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How far should the correctional system go to accommodate the diets of convicted

  1. bethperry profile image92
    bethperryposted 3 years ago

    How far should the correctional system go to accommodate the diets of convicted murderers?

    Steven J. Hayes is on Connecticut's death row for his part in the 2007 triple murder/rape/arson crime that took the lives of Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her two young daughters. Hayes is now suing Connecticut's Dept. of Corrections on the grounds his 8th Amendment rights are being denied because he isn't being served a kosher diet. According to Hayes and his lawyer, the situation has forced him to endure "starvation". How valid do you think Hayes's claims are, and how far should the correctional system go to accommodate the dietary choices of convicted murderers?

  2. The Examiner-1 profile image75
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    Maybe a cheap version of the diet is acceptable because an expensive one is similar to paying him for a hotel, but saying no may be similar to hanging him. Do we do that anymore? Does his sentence deserve that?

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      That isn't a bad proposal, Kevin. Does Steven J. Hayes deserve death? Let's see: he raped Jennifer Hawke-Petit after his partner raped her 11-year old daughter. The two of them murdered mother & both her daughters before setting their home ablaze

    2. The Examiner-1 profile image75
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I cannot say how I would be as a judge (or even on a jury) but let me see. He killed about 1.5 people (since his partner was in on it) and raped 1. Since he is on death row, how about making his last meal the special diet.

    3. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Kevin, I think under his particular circumstances, that is a generous resolution. Thanks for sharing the idea!

  3. profile image0
    sheilamyersposted 3 years ago

    Even before I clicked on your question to read more details, a Kosher diet popped into my head. Death row inmate or not, I don't think people should have to starve while they're waiting out their appeals and so forth. A meal can be Kosher without having any additional cost added to making it. No matter who the prisoner is, or what part of the prison they inhabit, they should be permitted meals that fit their religious restrictions even if it means they're eating something different than all of the other prisoners that day or if is the same food it needs a little different preparation.

    However, I think the law suit in this case will fall flat if the guy is being given foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables and he's not actually starving. There are always alternatives.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Well said and sensible, Sheila.

  4. fpherj48 profile image76
    fpherj48posted 3 years ago

    Beth..  Oh dear, girlfriend.  I would simply LOVE to respond to this question! (you can't imagine!)  However, Not only would my clear, blatant and powerful (not to mention, colorful) reply not only be in total violation of all rules and get me banished to a deserted island forever......My computer and yours would implode and disintegrate before our eyes.
    This particular EGREGIOUS case.....most horrific crimes of savagery by non-human scum of the earth.....is one I dare not to provide my personal solutions on how to "care for/treat" these pathetic specimen of fecal matter.
    I'm positive you get my subtle drift?

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      fpherj48, YES ma'am, I DO! And I hear you, too. My hubby worked for years as a correctional officer, and good lordy, the tales of the sense of privilege some hardened prisoners assumed was enough to curl your hair!

  5. peeples profile image95
    peeplesposted 3 years ago

    Your question leads me to a question. If he were a Christian on death row and was denied his bible how much uproar would there be? My opinion? If he was Jewish (I assume) before he entered prison then he should be given the lowest cost Kosher diet available, just as Christians get their bibles and Muslims get Korans and praying mats. The rules can't be picked. They are either followed 100% or should be thrown out all together.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      peeples, I'm not a Christian so have no opinion or speculation on the "uproar" aspect. But I agree with you on the fairness in rules point.

    2. profile image0
      sheilamyersposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Very well said.

  6. Penny G profile image75
    Penny Gposted 3 years ago

    I think they should be treated the same as all Prisoners. In correctional facilities religious diets are given to those who are registered as the religion that requires a special diet. Should they be denied, legal action could occur and they would most likely win!

 
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