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Should former Presidents "stay out" of American affairs after their term is over

  1. RJ Schwartz profile image92
    RJ Schwartzposted 9 months ago

    Should former Presidents "stay out" of American affairs after their term is over?

    Former President Barack Obama is meeting with world leaders, spouting rhetoric to foreign reporters, and attacking the policies of President Trump.  Most Presidents aside from Taft who went on to be a Supreme Court justice, relax and only play roles when elections come around, such as Bill Clinton did.  George W. Bush was silent after leaving office for many years.  Where do you stand on this topic?

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  2. Jeremy Gill profile image95
    Jeremy Gillposted 9 months ago

    I don't see any obligation for them to stay out of politics. While many would probably want to after being so heavily involved, they certainly don't have to, and it can help current presidents when their predecessors offer advice.

    Heck, some presidents even rerun after stepping away from the White House. Grover Cleveland, for example, was both our 22nd and 24th president, having enjoyed a small period out of the Oval Office.

    As long as the former presidents understand that they no longer hold the position they once did, there's no harm to them offering their wisdom even after leaving office.

    1. gregas profile image82
      gregasposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      But the former president shouldn't create havoc for the new president.

    2. Jeremy Gill profile image95
      Jeremy Gillposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Agreed, like I said, as long as they understand their power is largely gone.

      Still, what some people call havoc, others call making a stand. That's the trouble with politics ha.

    3. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
      bradmasterOCcalposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Jeremy, do you think that Obama understands his power is gone?

    4. Jeremy Gill profile image95
      Jeremy Gillposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Hmm.. He hasn't yet crossed the line for me, but he does need to be careful not to go too far. Of course, where "too far" is depends on who you're asking.

    5. MizBejabbers profile image90
      MizBejabbersposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Yes, that's true. Republican Senator Tom Cotton stepped over the line when Obama was president, and I don't see any one criticizing him for his interference in Obama's policies.

  3. Perspycacious profile image82
    Perspycaciousposted 9 months ago

    No.  But, it would be nice if they stayed out of politics!  I think Bush II did a good job of devoting himself to painting, and he's getting good at it, too.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image90
      MizBejabbersposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Bush II was just a tool for the powers that be at that time. He was probably relieved to go home and pick up a paint brush. And yes, he's proving to be a talented artist.

  4. MizBejabbers profile image90
    MizBejabbersposted 9 months ago

    No, after one or two terms in the White House, like them or not, they are the voice of experience. That is my answer to your question, but you've gone on and singled out Obama for interference. I'm not sure what he is doing and I'm not sure of his motive, so it would have been better to have asked "should former president Obama interfere in Donald Trump's politics?" instead of asking a loaded question. To that question I would say that I need more information to answer. I may be a Democrat, but I never fully trusted Obama, and it had nothing to do with his being black. To some of us, he always seemed indecisive when he was running for Pres. and he seemed indecisive in some of the WH policies.

    1. RJ Schwartz profile image92
      RJ Schwartzposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      I only used Obama as an example - he's not the first ex-Pres to have issues giving up power

 
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