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What happens to the trash from Hurricane Harvey and Irma?

  1. tsmog profile image83
    tsmogposted 5 months ago

    What happens to the trash from Hurricane Harvey and Irma?

  2. RTalloni profile image88
    RTalloniposted 5 months ago

    The ocean has pretty much claimed it. A choice will have to be made re the debris people must clean up. Those choices are mostly to take it out by truckloads to inland landfills, dump it in the ocean, or have a big bonfire.

    The main reason I'm responding to this question is because I just heard an interview in which someone was discussing the issue of FEMA continuing to pay out our tax monies for people to rebuild on shifting sands. 

    The discussion was worth pondering and a public discussion among people willing to speak up on the matter would be important. His proposition was that no one be allowed to build homes within a mile of the beach. Tough love...

    Anyway, either we will continue to pay for the consequences of trash being created from so many buildings being destroyed because they were built where they shouldn't have been built, or we will not.

    1. Ericdierker profile image57
      Ericdierkerposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      That is so refreshing. Common sense. Catastrophe for man does not mean it for nature. Storms like these two do not hurt our earth. They are part of it. Our favorite out here is living in a desert. Duh, we run out of water duh.

    2. tsmog profile image83
      tsmogposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      You are right about building where natural disasters likely will occur. They expect to have 8 million cubic yards of waste for Harvey. Here is a link to an article https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/06/us/g … ml?mcubz=0

    3. RTalloni profile image88
      RTalloniposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      Knowing about hurricanes results in appropriate expectations: https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/ne … efits-2016 Equalling no panic at the wind/rain/flooding/etc and acceptance of responsibility for building near water. Duh smile

    4. Ericdierker profile image57
      Ericdierkerposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      Tim that is scary. And it just hit me that probably a tenth of that is toxic to some level. The chemicals in garages and under the sink. And some portions have to have feces on them. Or did all that already go into the ocean?

    5. tsmog profile image83
      tsmogposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      It is scary. Add Irma's to it. That is a 'lot' of landfill. They said for Sandy it was the equivalent of 4 Empire State buildings of refuse. They ask it be separated, but how many do you think will? Good point on toxic to the environment.

  3. peoplepower73 profile image92
    peoplepower73posted 5 months ago

    Too bad all that trash can't be converted to energy.

 
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