"OIL" We are being "Robbed!"

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  1. qwark profile image56
    qwarkposted 7 years ago

    There is enuf oil in the "Bakken" oil reserve to fuel the  American economy for 2041 years straight!

    We now have access of up to 500 billion barrels. 
    And because this is light,
    sweet oil, those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL!

    http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911

    We are being robbed by the oil barons.

    QWark

    1. Jim Hunter profile image59
      Jim Hunterposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Now that the average price for a gallon of gas is 3 dollars who is at fault?

      When gas prices were high in 2005 it was Bush who was at fault, but now???

      The incompetent in chief has said that he would prefer the gas price to be 4 dollars a gallon.

      How come Hussein isn't receiving any blame for high gas prices?

      1. qwark profile image56
        qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        We the people are at fault Jim.
        The damned conservationists weild too much power!
        WE have more oil under "OUR" ground than all the middle eastern countries combined!
        Qwark

        1. Jim Hunter profile image59
          Jim Hunterposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          We the people are not at fault.

          Liberals are at fault and they need to be eradicated.

          They are the true global calamity.

          1. qwark profile image56
            qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            hahaha....lol you are funny Jim!
            Who are liberals? "We the people!"
            With your attitude, Maybe you could take over when Gaddafi falls...eh?
            Sumthin' to think about!
            Qwark

            1. Jim Hunter profile image59
              Jim Hunterposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              "We the people" are not liberals.

              Liberals are a finite group who hold an unusually large amount of power.

              "We the people" are the ones who check them.

              1. qwark profile image56
                qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                Ok Jim smile:
                If that's what you'd like to believe, NP.  smile:
                Now back to the subject of my forum subject.
                Thanks for the response  ( I think?)
                Qwark

    2. kerryg profile image87
      kerrygposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Um, where are you getting the figure of 2041 years? The article you linked to said Bakken has 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels. The US uses about 6.5-7 billion barrels per year, so that would be enough to cover about 1/2 to 3/4 of the US's oil consumption for one year. Even if your number of 500 billion barrels is correct (source?), that's still only about 70 years.

      1. qwark profile image56
        qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Terry Johnson, the Montana
        Legislature's
        financial analyst.

        '... a recent technological breakthrough has opened up the Bakken's massive
        reserves..... and we now have access of up to 500 billion barrels.  And because this is light,
        sweet oil, those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL!
        That's enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 2041 years!"

        U.. S. Oil Discovery- Largest Reserve in the World
        Stansberry Report Online - 4/20/2006
        Hidden 1,000 feet beneath the surface of the Rocky Mountains lies the largest
        untapped oil reserve in the world. It is more than 2 TRILLION barrels.

        Just posting what I read.

        Regardless of whether the numbers are correct, there is no reason for us to be dependent upon foreign oil.

        Qwark

        1. kerryg profile image87
          kerrygposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Should have thought to check here earlier:

          http://www.snopes.com/politics/gasoline/bakken.asp

          500 billion barrels in Bakken is overstating it by well over 100x and the "more than 2 TRILLION" figure is based on the upper estimates (which are actually 1.5 - 1.8 trillion barrels) of shale oil in the Green River Formation. Shale oil has a very low EROEI compared to crude oil, uses a tremendous amount of water to produce (a serious financial and environmental problem in the arid Rockies), takes a long time to develop, and produces considerable quantities of toxic by-products that have to be disposed of, so in the absence of significant improvements in the technology used to extract it, most of the stuff is probably going to stay where it is.

          Our proven oil reserves, excluding shale oil and the SPR, were about 21 billion barrels as of 2006. We're estimated to have up to ~50 billion undiscovered barrels onshore and up to ~115 billion offshore. That's less than 30 years at current levels of consumption even assuming the higher estimates are correct and it's all recoverable.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_reserv … ted_States

          1. qwark profile image56
            qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            KerryG:
            Excellent response!
            I hadn't checked with "snopes."
            There are so many other ways to create usable energy that it seems to me that to still use the product of dead organic materials is primitive as hell.
            I will still contend, adamantly, that we are being snookered by greedy oil magnates who will fight to keep oil as the main source of world energy until the last drop is siphoned.
            Rex W. Tillerson, CEO of Exxon made that comment several yrs ago.
            Thanks for the "Snopes" reminder.  smile:
            Qwark

            1. kerryg profile image87
              kerrygposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              "I will still contend, adamantly, that we are being snookered by greedy oil magnates who will fight to keep oil as the main source of world energy until the last drop is siphoned."

              That goes without saying. smile

              1. qwark profile image56
                qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                Kerry:
                Amen!!  smile:
                Qwark

                1. profile image63
                  logic,commonsenseposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  I'll second that!
                  Not only that, add the commodity exchanges to that list as well.   They provide a vehicle for speculators to rape the consumer.

                  1. qwark profile image56
                    qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                    We're broke...and it happened with our eyes wide open!
                    Shame on us!
                    Qwark sad:

    3. Evan G Rogers profile image74
      Evan G Rogersposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      ... when you go to the gas station, you willingly shell out $3.00 per gallon.

      No one's getting robbed by anyone. You WILLINGLY hand over that money.

      WILLINGLY.

      That's called a "price", and you voluntarily pay it.

      On a side note, part of the reason why gas prices are rising is because they mandate that ethanol from corn be used in the gas. Not only that, but your tax dollars are being used to subsidize this stupid usage of corn. Now that corn is being used for fuel AND food, food prices (and gas) have been skyrocketing.

      Notice how you VOLUNTARILY pay for gas at the station, but had NO choice to fork money over to farmers who turn food into gas.

  2. fundguru profile image58
    fundguruposted 7 years ago

    Strange opinion. I thought especially in the US it is known that the story of the ending oil resopurces is an old hat. Americans universities found out that oilfields are refilling naturally and so it is believed that the theories how oil becomes produced by nature are wrong. Instead is now believed that geothermic reactions produce oil, a renewable energy.

    http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&c … l=&oq=

    1. qwark profile image56
      qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I have no idea what that has to do with my forum comment.
      WE are being scrooed, blooed, and tatooed by the oil industry, politicians and conservationists.
      The only reason oil prices are this hi is "greed" and an inability for the common man to intercede in his behalf.
      QWark

      1. profile image60
        C.J. Wrightposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I think he is trying to strengthen your argument. The fact is that most of the oil speculation is based on data that may be incorrect. Soooo, along with HUGE reserves, OIL is created naturally more readily than originally expected.

        1. qwark profile image56
          qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Ok, I'll buy that.
          But the BAkken oil reserve has been known about for a very long time as has been other fields in the USA.
          Qwark

          1. profile image60
            C.J. Wrightposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Right, but as your link suggest the ammount of oil available has possibly been drastically underestimated. This can be not only attributed to advances in drilling and recovery technology but also in how the volume of an oil feild is estimated.

            I do get your drift and do agree that the oil industry has take advantage of the "green lobby". They have used enviromental wacko's scare tactics to their financial advantage. The government is going to go along because it's a cash cow for them. Huge revenues are generated on gasoline alone.

  3. optimus grimlock profile image58
    optimus grimlockposted 7 years ago

    theres more oil in alaska then the middle east. the thing that makes gas so expensive is it gets taxed 14-17 times before it gets to our cars.

  4. qwark profile image56
    qwarkposted 7 years ago

    check this pls.

    http://www.usgs.gov/corecast/details.asp?ep=38

    Listen to #38

    Qwark

  5. brimancandy profile image79
    brimancandyposted 7 years ago

    I have said this before many times. The sooner they threaten to take all oil products off the stock market, thew sooner you will watch oil prices drop like a rock.

    People are buying stock in oil, and putting pressure on companies to keep the price of oil high, so that they continue to make a profit. So, there could be someone sitting on their ass doing nothing, who is cashing in on how much money each of us is spending on a gallon of gas.

    The sooner you take all those hundreds and thousands of investors out of the picture. The sooner there will be more control on the price. Deregulation, and splitting up the oil Monopolies might help as well. But, with a republican governement with the oil companies in their back pocket. This isn't ever going to happen.

    1. Evan G Rogers profile image74
      Evan G Rogersposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      say it with me now:

      "As prices go up, alternatives become more economical!"

      And with that -- basically the first 20 minutes of ANY economics course -- your entire argument goes up in smoke.

      Remember, you can always VOLUNTARILY give them less money by riding a bike, or building alternatives. The problem is, however, those alternatives cost MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH more than simply buying a car and driving with gas up towards $3.00/gallon.

      Sure, gas prices are high. But compare that to buying an electric car!! LOLOLOLOLOL

      1. kerryg profile image87
        kerrygposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        "The problem is, however, those alternatives cost MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH more than simply buying a car and driving with gas up towards $3.00/gallon."

        Um, since when does a bike cost more than a car? As far as renewables go, that's mostly because renewables get a fraction of the subsidies given to oil and gas.

        http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-07-2 … shows.html

        http://www.grist.org/article/2009-09-22 … bama-wants

  6. wilderness profile image97
    wildernessposted 7 years ago

    The article repeatedly used the term "technically recoverable" in reference to the Bakken field.

    Does that mean that we can get it out of the ground, but that it is cheaper to buy it on the open market because of the difficulty of extraction?  That would surely put a damper on the $16 a barrel cost (that I didn't spot in the article)...

  7. Deal Finder profile image54
    Deal Finderposted 7 years ago

    One thing not being mentioned here is the unrest in the middle east here recent.  These prices are direct derivatives of the actions we have seen taking place over there.  The Suez Canal is having concerns with the demonstrations going on.  This gets speculators worried so the price go's up as the Suez Canal supports over 80% of exported oil to the word.  If these riots continue we can count on it going up even more, but if the Suez Canal closes we will see 8 to 10 dollars a gallon prices.

    1. qwark profile image56
      qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Deal:

      Ty for making my point...powerfully!

      If we weren't dependent upon foreign oil, the troubles in N Africa and the Middle East would not be worrisome!

      We have the inherent potential to supply our own "energy" but it seems that conservationists, political greed and lack of aggressive drive by American citizens will result in contuining robbery by big oil!

      You all know me as a pessemist when it comes to human future.
      The current world economy is bouys my pessimism!

      Qwark

 
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