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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (35 posts)

Is the United States of America slowly becoming a christian theocracy?

  1. SteveMacken profile image59
    SteveMackenposted 7 years ago

    The ever increasing conservatism of the United States political landscape, combined with the christian rhetoric emanating therefrom, along with certain legislative actions taken in recent years, would lead this neutral observer to believe that this is the case.

    1. lady_love158 profile image57
      lady_love158posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      You don't sound neutral. What legislation can you cite to back up you therory. Everything I have observed shows America going in a more hostile direction to christianity.

      1. SteveMacken profile image59
        SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I consider myself neutral because I have no vested interest; I have no vote in the USA.

        I can cite the following enactments as examples...

        HR 847, passed 11th December, 2007, by a majority of 327-9 recognises "the importance of Christmas and the Christian Faith." It makes no reference to other faiths and the Bill's sponsor, Rep Steve King (R-IA) voted against similar legislation honouring holidays of other faiths. He said on Fox News that his motivation was "to uphold America's status as a Christian Nation."

        HR 471, passed 30th March, 2010, diverts public money away from public schools and gives it to private schools, 82% of which are christian religious schools.

        The Soldier Fitness Tracker, mandatory US military survey implies non-believers are unfit to serve.

        HR 3, passed 4th May, 2011 removes Federal funding for abortions for victims of rape.

        There are more, but I'm sure you know how to use a search engine.

        1. lady_love158 profile image57
          lady_love158posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          HR's aren't necessarily laws they have to pass in the senate too. Removing fu ding for abortion has nothing to do with religion its a constitutional issue. I'd say your argument is weak.

          1. John Holden profile image61
            John Holdenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Would you say as weak or not as weak as your counter argument?

          2. SteveMacken profile image59
            SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Perhaps, lady_love158, but I don't believe I was making an argument. I believe I was making an observation and inviting discussion. Unlike many in these fora, I don't know everything and am always happy to learn from others.

            Your point on HR's is taken but all the HRs cited were subsequently passed by the senate.

            HR3 is a constitutional issue? Really? That is interesting. I didn't know abortion was unconstitutional. Some commentators in the US have said that HR3 is religiously motivated and anti women. But that's just their opinion, isn't it?

            1. lady_love158 profile image57
              lady_love158posted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Abortion is a constitutional issue in this sense, that the purpose of the formation of our government was to insure that our God given rights to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness are protected for all individuals. At some point yet to be defined a fetus becomes an individual worthy of constitutional protection.

              Until that point is defined government shouldn't be funding the murder of innocent individuals.

              1. SteveMacken profile image59
                SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                Thanks for the clarification, lady_love158.

                I take it you oppose federally funded abortions for victims of rape then.

        2. Evan G Rogers profile image75
          Evan G Rogersposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          "I'm neutral because I can't vote".

          That's nonsense.

          Saddam Hussein and Osama Bin Laden couldn't vote... they sure as hell weren't neutral!

          1. SteveMacken profile image59
            SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            I'm sorry, Evan, in the context of this discussion, I'm not really sure what you are actually saying, can you elaborate please?

    2. qwark profile image57
      qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Steve:
      What do you think your chances would be, even if you were a billionaire, to become Pres. of these United States if you ran as an avowed atheist?
      Or you were just one who could not say: "in god we trust" or would drop the word "god" from the "Pledge of Allegiance?"
      Zilch!
      75% of Americans believe in a fairytale god thing!
      WE are a theocratic republic!
      I sometimes consider the possibility (maybe probability) that we are under the fascist control of coporations and religion.
      There's no doubt that we are experiencing change. With what results? Who knows?
      Qwark

      1. SteveMacken profile image59
        SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        To answer your question, not if I were a trillionaire.

        Considering that a 2006 survey conducted by the University of Minnesota put atheists at the bottom of the trust league, this is not surprising.

        A 1999 poll, conducted by Gallup, put at 48% the number of people who would refuse to vote for president, "a generally well-qualified person" if that person were an atheist.

        A Newsweek survey in 2007 put at 62% the number of people who would refuse to vote for any candidate admitting to being an atheist.

        1. qwark profile image57
          qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Steve:
          The american voters, my neighbors, are nuts!
          Qwark

    3. pylos26 profile image75
      pylos26posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      yo dude...any sensible person may observe nature and realize that the country is becoming more seculat every season...duhhh. so the answer to your lame question is a ripe NO.

      1. SteveMacken profile image59
        SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Thank you for your intelligent, well reasoned and lucid argument.

    4. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Apparently you haven't been in the trenches for the last few years fighting the increasing spread of secularism and all things totally anti-Christian.

      1. SteveMacken profile image59
        SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Indeed I haven't, Brenda, but I have observed an increasing amount of rhetoric from US politicians politicising religion, christianity in particular, that seems to undermine the separation of church and state.

        The use of laws, propositions and resolutions at state and federal level, whether enacted or not, that support a principle based on religious dogma, would make any neutral observer ask the same question.

        1. lady_love158 profile image57
          lady_love158posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          By the way the constitution doesn't limit the state from supporting religions it limits the federal government from establishing a state religion. Did you know that religious services were held in the capitol building on Sundays for years? I don't believe they do that any more.

          1. SteveMacken profile image59
            SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            That's very interesting, lady_love158, I wasn't aware of that.

            I do believe that the holding of religious services in the Capitol on Sundays could possibly be construed as state sponsored religion so an end to it was probably just preempting a constitutional challege to the practice.

    5. tony0724 profile image58
      tony0724posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      If anything I believe the oppisite is true. We are becoming more secular. And I believe the removal of God from American life is directly proportional to the ever growing moral bankruptcy we read about on the internet and in the papers everyday. I think we need a little more God in this society.

      1. SteveMacken profile image59
        SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        With reference to 'the removal of God from American society', how is this manifested, and would you approve of the use of the legislature to change this?

        1. tony0724 profile image58
          tony0724posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Yes I would.

          1. SteveMacken profile image59
            SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            In what way, tony0724, would you use the legislature? What enactments would you like to see?

      2. qwark profile image57
        qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Tony:

        Really? More "god?!!!"

        Are you nuts and blind?

        People have been killing people in gods name ever since man began to record his history!

        Pls, if you can, define this "moral bankruptcy" you envision.

        Morality is defined by culture.

        The majority of american citizens are religious and "morality," in these United States of America is determined by them.

        I'm sure that when you attempt to define "moral bankruptcy" your presumption will be a religiously oriented one.

        Morality should be based upon reality and survival, not upon hope and a reward and punishment system created by troglodytes who based their beliefs on abject ignorance and fear!

        This is the 21st century! Lets get real!

        Qwark

        1. SteveMacken profile image59
          SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Qwark, if I may, I'd like to add some logic here.

          According to the 2008 census, 87% of the US population identified themselves as members of a religion. 76% identified themselves as members of the christian religion. If there is, as tony0724 states, a moral bankruptcy in America, then it is logical to assume that the moral bankruptcy is proportionally representative amongst those who identify with a religion.

          Or perhaps the moral bankruptcy is only amongst the 13% who do not identify with any religion, but that is illogical and most unlikely.

          The US Department of Corrections statistics indicate that 99.8% of the prison population identify with a religion while only 0.2% identify with no religion.

          The moral bankruptcy tony0724 mentions does not therefore seem to be, prima facie, directly related to a lack of religion in a society.

          1. qwark profile image57
            qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            ...the "stats" do make my point!
            Ty!
            Qwark

          2. TLMinut profile image60
            TLMinutposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            You really can't go by prisoners claiming a religion, can you? You'd have to find out what they claimed before they went in, once they're in, it looks better and gets them privileges to claim a religion. They get meetings with others and a reason to claim "proof" that they've changed thier ways.

            1. SteveMacken profile image59
              SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Indeed, TLMinut, there may well be extenuating circumstances that alter the accuracy of the prison statistics but if you allow for the proportion of the prison population avowing religious affiliation to be reflective of society as a whole, you still end up with a result that suggests that more religion does not necessarily equate to an increase in morality.

  2. lovemychris profile image62
    lovemychrisposted 7 years ago

    We're going backwards! We're de-volving even as technology is advancing.

    It's all about control. And what better than a scared, police-state, judgemental society to maintain control?

    "You are free to do just what we tell you to do."

    Our God.
    Our money.
    Our bodies.
    Our rule.

    YOU own nothing...not even your privacy.
    What you do in your private life is State Business.
    Subject to State Control.

    "The Handmaids Tale"....it's prophetic.

  3. Hugh Williamson profile image91
    Hugh Williamsonposted 7 years ago

    According to Gallup, Americans are becoming more secular in their view of politics.


    Gallup Poll
    December 29, 2010
    Near-Record High See Religion Losing Influence in America
    Current 70% nears all-time high of 75% recorded in 1970
    by Frank Newport

    PRINCETON, NJ -- Seven in 10 Americans say religion is losing its influence on American life -- one of the highest such responses in Gallup's 53-year history of asking this question, and significantly higher than in the first half of the past decade. (more...)

    http://www.gallup.com/poll/145409/Near- … erica.aspx

    1. SteveMacken profile image59
      SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the link, Hugh, it makes for interesting reading although it isn't clear from the survey whether those who said that religion was losing influence wanted religion to have more influence.

      I would assume that anyone who wanted religion to have more influence would respond in one particular way while those who wanted it to have less would respond in a different way.

      It's a pity the survey did not deal with this parameter specifically.

      It is interesting that the survey shows that Republicans, who many perceive as religiously conservative, are more inclined to say that religion is losing its influence.

  4. lovemychris profile image62
    lovemychrisposted 7 years ago

    How do you "remove" God?
    Either it's there, or it isn't. Putting it on money--degrades the concept!
    Forcing people to bow to your God--Anti-thetic to the whole concept!

    These people are just angry that the whole world doesn't think like them. IMO

    And using the State to enforce your view is a great means of control, but has nothing to do with God.
    Religion+State=Iran/Israel. Not good for freedom.

    1. SteveMacken profile image59
      SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I would agree that state religions are not good for the freedom of all citizens as it gives primacy to one dogma over all others and I believe that it would be contrary to the wishes of the founding fathers, who would appear to have been secular in their outlook, and against the constitution.

  5. Hugh Williamson profile image91
    Hugh Williamsonposted 7 years ago

    We would be better served by a government guided by morality rather than religion. Religion doesn't necessarily ensure moral behavior, as other posts have pointed out.

    When someone promotes God or religion being involved in government, they inevitably mean their God and their religion.

    1. SteveMacken profile image59
      SteveMackenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Indeed, Hugh, religion does not guarantee morality. The morality of the individual is independent of that individual's religious persuasion. It would be fair to say that the morality of a nation would be similarly independent.

 
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