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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (30 posts)

Jailed for $280: The Return of Debtors' Prisons

  1. Stacie L profile image89
    Stacie Lposted 6 years ago

    Jailed for $280: The Return of Debtors' Prisons
    By Alain Sherter | CBS MoneyWatch

    Although the U.S. abolished debtors' prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don't pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to credit card and auto loans. In parts of Illinois, debt collectors commonly use publicly funded courts, sheriff's deputies, and country jails to pressure people who owe even small amounts to pay Although the http://finance.yahoo.com/news/jailed-fo … isons.html one woman in the article was jailed after she couldn't pay a $280. medical bill for breast cancer treatment...now that's humane!

  2. Reality Bytes profile image81
    Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago

    It's very easy to pick up another bid while incarcerated. 

    The corporations must need more slaves for their labor camps?

  3. tobey100 profile image60
    tobey100posted 6 years ago

    I do believe she was probably arrested for not responding to a court summons, etc.  Not the debt itself.

    1. Reality Bytes profile image81
      Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      When the person does show up to Court and makes an agreement, the council for the creditor appeals the agreement once the defendant leaves the court.  This is done until a default occurs.

      1. tobey100 profile image60
        tobey100posted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Didn't know that.

  4. Randy Godwin profile image92
    Randy Godwinposted 6 years ago

    Prisons are big business nowadays.  Especially in Texas and other predominantly conservative states.  Since being privatized, the number of inmates affects the amount of money the state pays the institution for housing and feeding them.

    I believe Barbara Bush was reported to have bought interest into a huge prison facility in Texas not long ago.

    Thar's gold in them thar convictions!  yikes  Nothing new in the world of heartless business enterprises.  smile

                                         http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

    1. Reality Bytes profile image81
      Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      These private prisons are using solitary confinement as a form of torture.  Work or stay enclosed for 23 hours everyday.

      1. Repairguy47 profile image61
        Repairguy47posted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Oh my God, you mean they are punishing criminals?

        1. Reality Bytes profile image81
          Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          No, they are punishing law abiding citizens by bringing jobs in to the prison system and rewarding criminals with food, shelter, healthcare, and employment.

          Plenty of unemployed individuals are suffering so megacorps can reap in huge profits.

          We are becoming a society of prisons.  Why does the United States incarcerate the highest percentage of its population on the globe?

          http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/cri_p … per-capita

          1. Repairguy47 profile image61
            Repairguy47posted 6 years agoin reply to this

            So giving a law abiding citizen a job is now punishment? Would you explain that please.

            1. Reality Bytes profile image81
              Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              Bringing in thousands of jobs in to our prison system instead of hiring law abiding citizens outside of the labor camps hurts society as a whole.

              1. Repairguy47 profile image61
                Repairguy47posted 6 years agoin reply to this

                I see, wonder how much those prisoners are being paid?

                1. Reality Bytes profile image81
                  Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  Prisoners earning 23 cents an hour in U.S. federal prisons are manufacturing high-tech electronic components for Patriot Advanced Capability 3 missiles, launchers for TOW (Tube-launched, Optically tracked, Wire-guided) anti-tank missiles, and other guided missile systems. A March article by journalist and financial researcher Justin Rohrlich of World in Review is worth a closer look at the full implications of this ominous development. (minyanville.com)

                  The expanding use of prison industries, which pay slave wages, as a way to increase profits for giant military corporations, is a frontal attack on the rights of all workers.

                  Prison labor — with no union protection, overtime pay, vacation days, pensions, benefits, health and safety protection, or Social Security withholding — also makes complex components for McDonnell Douglas/Boeing’s F-15 fighter aircraft, the General Dynamics/Lockheed Martin F-16, and Bell/Textron’s Cobra helicopter. Prison labor produces night-vision goggles, body armor, camouflage uniforms, radio and communication devices, and lighting systems and components for 30-mm to 300-mm battleship anti-aircraft guns, along with land mine sweepers and electro-optical equipment for the BAE Systems Bradley Fighting Vehicle’s laser rangefinder. Prisoners recycle toxic electronic equipment and overhaul military vehicles.

                  Labor in federal prisons is contracted out by UNICOR, previously known as Federal Prison Industries, a quasi-public, for-profit corporation run by the Bureau of Prisons. In 14 prison factories, more than 3,000 prisoners manufacture electronic equipment for land, sea and airborne communication. UNICOR is now the U.S. government’s 39th largest contractor, with 110 factories at 79 federal penitentiaries.

                  http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php? … ;aid=25376

                  1. Stacie L profile image89
                    Stacie Lposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                    Well that certainly is something I've never read about ,until now. Thanks

                  2. Eric Newland profile image61
                    Eric Newlandposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                    The fair thing to do would be to have those companies pay for the cost of the incarceration itself. They are receiving benefits, technically. Their "employer" should pay for them.

              2. Eric Newland profile image61
                Eric Newlandposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                Again, how does privatizing prisons lead to more prisoners? Even if they have a profit motive to get more prisoners they have no control over who gets convicted.

                1. Reality Bytes profile image81
                  Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  Lobbying for stricter sentences on minor crimes.  With a high profit margin, there is plenty of money to persuade politicians.  Especially when said politicians hold a large bundle of stocks in the labor camps.

    2. Repairguy47 profile image61
      Repairguy47posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      How do you feel that of 5 States where debt can get you put in jail Georgia (not Texas) is one of them?

      But to be fair, these arrests are not for outstanding debt but for not paying court costs or fines.

      Some backwards States just can't get out of the 18th century.

      1. Randy Godwin profile image92
        Randy Godwinposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I'm embarrassed for both Texas and my state of Georgia, along with Florida and many others. 

                                      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

    3. Eric Newland profile image61
      Eric Newlandposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      So, what, do representatives from these private prisons sit on juries in disproportionately high numbers or something?

  5. lovemychris profile image62
    lovemychrisposted 6 years ago

    In think the fair thing to do is not to tie a profit motive to locking people up.

    You know they are traded on the stock exchange? It's sickening what money does to people.

    1. Reality Bytes profile image81
      Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Every "person" is a publicly traded commodity.  Look at the red letters and numbers on your social security card.  Call a broker and ask what the bond with corresponding characters as your ss card traded at.

      1. lovemychris profile image62
        lovemychrisposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Figures. sad

  6. prettydarkhorse profile image64
    prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago

    poverty status criminalized if it is true

    1. Repairguy47 profile image61
      Repairguy47posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Its not.

      1. lovemychris profile image62
        lovemychrisposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        If they're throwing you in prison for not having money...it is.

  7. Jerami profile image70
    Jeramiposted 6 years ago

    I read that this morning and I thought there were only five states doing this, Texas not being one of them,

      The collection companies lobbied for legislation forcing the judicial system to enforce contempt of court laws,

      This lady was put in Jail for not apearing in court to answer the lawsuit brought by the collection agency.

      In Texas the credit card companies can sue you for nonpayment but if you apear in court they usually loose, but if you do not show up they win by default.  If you happen to be in this situation check for yourself to see if this applies in your state and county courts.

       It is our legal right to sue anyone for anything whether the facts of the case are true or not.
      If the other party does not show up you win this court hearing by default.

      that is the way I understand it anyway.

 
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