This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-13 of 13 discussions (13 posts)

Why Do Parents Oppose Their Children Marrying A Person of a Different Skin Color

  1. ngureco profile image84
    ngurecoposted 9 years ago

    Why Do Parents Oppose Their Children Marrying A Person of a Different Skin Color? (Minimum 150 Words)

  2. lindagoffigan profile image60
    lindagoffiganposted 9 years ago

    Take the minimum words off and you will get more responses.  Hubbers know the value of lengthy hubs of relevance and quality.  You may luck up and get someone who will give you a 150 word answer.  But think about what I told you.

  3. catwhitehead profile image78
    catwhiteheadposted 9 years ago

    It's not the skin color parents object to. Few people have the same skin shade. Some parents have prejudices and preconceived notions of what people with a particular skin color are like. But for the most part, I believe parents want their children to be healthy, happy, and well taken care of, and they worry that this is less likely to happen if their children marry someone of a different culture.

    There are a number of issues parents look at when their children are considering marriage.  Will the potential spouse make enough money to keep their offspring in the manner to which they are (or want to be) accustomed?  Is family important to them? Will they agree to spend family time with both sides of the family?  What about religion, political views, morals, and values?

    Many parents believe their children will be more likely to follow the path that leads to a good life if they marry someone similar to themselves.  Looking at the blue eyed vs. brown eyed study of children that was publicized years ago can open eyes to the fact that people with different colors of skin can be more similar than they think. If people only married people who looked like them, we'd be a world of clones rather than a world of individuals.

  4. profile image48
    Mienooposted 9 years ago

    I absolutely agree with lindagoffigan here above.Surely,it is the quality and not the quantity that should matter.If you do decide to heed lindagoffigan's wise words,do let us know and I shall give you a very short and succinct answer to your question.Okay?

  5. Tamarii2 profile image61
    Tamarii2posted 9 years ago

    YOU ALWAYS HAVE GOOD QUESTIONS.SOME PEOPLE LIVE WITH DIFFERENT SOCIAL BACK GROUNDS.MY PARENTS PRO ONE RACE BUT I WENT TO A SCHOOL WHERE ONE RACE DOMINATED.I FELL IN LOVE WITH THE OTHER RACE AN NEVER TOLD ANY ONE.I MADE CHOICES TO DATE MY RACE,BUT I DID NOT FEEL COMPLETE UNTIL I DATED OUT SIDE MY RACE.MY FRIENDS STILL TO THIS DAY DO NOT KNOW. BUT WHEN I MARRY I WILL MARRY THE RACE I LIKE.I AM BRAVE THIS TIME BECAUSE I WILL LOOK THE OTHER WAY AN BE HAPPY. THE GUYS IN COLLEGE WERE OKAY WITH IT.I LET MY SOUL MATE GO....... PEACE.

  6. Doing my part profile image54
    Doing my partposted 8 years ago

    Quite simply because this world is cruel and certainly still full of discrimination and racism.   

    I think it also has to do with grandchildren. 

    Parents may have the ability to see that their son or daughter in an interacial relationship have the maturity and most of all the love for each other to make an interacial marriage work between themselves.  But being parents, (admittedly more so the white parents) would worry any grandchildren may have to endure unnecessary discrimination, racism or bigotry,

    The good news is that I think the stigmatism is becoming less and less and that the younger generation is less obsessed with racism than the older generation.

  7. Lady_E profile image75
    Lady_Eposted 8 years ago

    I agree with  Catwhitehead and even though the world is getting more tolerant on this issue (cos there are higher rates of mixed relationships/marriages) Racism will never be totally eradicated. 

    Speaking for my parents – they are very open-minded.  If I take a Russian, Polish or Spanish man home and introduced him as my future husband, they would welcome him with open arms.  My parents have always said to me. “If you are happy, we are happy”.

    For those who oppose such marriages, I hope they experience rejection in their lives so they see how it feels.

  8. DancingRedFeather profile image60
    DancingRedFeatherposted 8 years ago

    simple..because the race gets so mixed that it gets lost. Even God planned that each marry in their own race to keep the race pure.

    That is the main reason, not to lose our race. It has nothing to do with being racist.  It's to keep the race and culture pure as once you get mixed - all gets mixed and many lost.

    Us natives married whites and thus lost our culture and our children don't even talk our language and we don't even look like aboriginals anymore because we so mixed.

  9. profile image50
    E2W_Life storiesposted 8 years ago

    I am assuming this question pertains to different skin color as a different race.  I would say the parents who have this preference for  their children to marry someone of the same race is not always motivated by a hatred for the other race.  Most of the time it has to do with finding someone who is familiar with their culture, values and way of life in general.  Even if a person is willing to learn the culture it will not be the same as if they were born into it.  Falling in love with a person from a different race is just like falling in love with a person of the same race.  Its what follows the after love chapter of their life that determines whether or not they feel complete in their relationship.  Also remember it is not just about race, religion will play a huge role in the union of people of different races.  You can have two races with the same faith and two races with entirely different faiths.  The second two usually have more room for regret after marriage.  And for some races if they are alike the appreciation for marriage as a sacred bond is stronger than some in Western society.  All parents want success for their children and happiness.  Its a parental desire.

  10. C.V.Rajan profile image77
    C.V.Rajanposted 8 years ago

    Skin color has a strong bearing on one's association with a culture. As one grows older, one's willingness to "experiment with newer cultures" gets narrower. Rightly or wrongly, most of us have an inborn affinity to our own clan and culture and consequently to our skin color too.

    Like skin color, most of us have our affinity to our religion, religious sects, mother tongue, native country, native place and so on. All these affinities become more and more important and meaningful to us as we age.

    In India, this affinity tends to get further narrowed down to the caste system. Indian parents want to have the highest say in the selection of a spouse for their children, because they want to ensure compatibility between the spouses in the long run.

    My article on the success of Indian marriages may be of interest to you:

    http://hubpages.com/hub/How-to-learn-su … from-India

  11. profile image43
    YeseniaFrometaposted 8 years ago

    fear that has been instilled in the person since childhood, also closed minds i mean have you ever seen interacial children how beautiful they are?

  12. TheLegendTomWing profile image53
    TheLegendTomWingposted 8 years ago

    This is really a question for a dissertation or some other obnoxiously long and in-depth analysis. Personally I think it stems from a few things. Socioeconomic status is a big one. Unfortunately there are not equal proportions of Caucasians with money and people of color with money. Prejudice with respect to our preconceived notions about different types of people can affect how we feel about them.

    Or it could just be people are inherently racist and afraid of what's different, who knows! great question, and some really good responses.

  13. profile image54
    skytreeroadposted 4 years ago

    Because everyone wants a miniature of themselves, and a living, breathing testament of themselves is better than a bust or a full size statue. A lot of parents do want a grandchild that is different from themselves, but the majority want to see more of him/herself in the next generation. They want to see if Great grandpa's nose passed down to junior. Some parents have a racial purity issue, a lot of Islanders, and small countries want racial purity. Not to the point of inbreeding, but to the point of keeping the traits alive of the particular country. English, German, Swedish, Dutch, Africans, Chinese, Taiwan, Japanese, American Indians, each has different traits. Some Africans won't date Africans from a different country on the African continent. In Mexico it depends on your dialect among other things. American Indians like to date the same tribe, even if it is in another state. Caste has a place, too, but it is the hereditary features most people moan about.

 
working