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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (7 posts)

What is ur opinion about teen mums?

  1. profile image60
    peter565posted 2 years ago

    What is ur opinion about teen mums?

    Teen mum is very uncommon these days, but 100 years ago, it is very common for girls to become a mum when they are only 15~16 years old. In Roman times, the law state it is the father's responsibility to find her daugther a good man as a husband by the time she is 16, with the law saying if the man is of bad character, the daughter can reject her father's arrangement and if the father failed to find his daughter a husband by 16, he must pay a yearly fine, till her daughter is married.

  2. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12876767_f260.jpg

    Many generations ago life expectancy was around 45 or 50 years.
    Today it's not uncommon for people to live well into their 70s, 80s, 90s, and even beyond 100 years of age.
    Also back in those days girls/women had little if any career and education options. Society was also fixated on female virginity and many men only wanted to marry virgins.
    Today it makes no sense for parents to encourage their young teenage daughters to marry at such a young age. The CEOs of General Motors, Xerox, IBM, Oracle Software, and Hewlett Packard are (women).
    A young girl today can go to college, establish a career, and not have to depend on a man financially. Better birth control methods have also made it possible for women to have sex on par with men without the fear of unwanted pregnancy. And should that happen Plan B and abortion services are available.
    The average age of a first time married woman in the U.S. is 27.
    Very few people find their "soul-mate" at age 16!
    More often than not at that age most people have not figured out who (they) are let alone what they want and need in a mate for life.
    With a divorce rate that hoovers around 50% odds are any 16 year old who gets married is likely making a big mistake, missing out on major opportunities in life, and most likely will cause herself financial hardship. When it comes to love/marriage most of us (fail our way) to success. Very few hit a homerun their first time at bat.

  3. tamarawilhite profile image91
    tamarawilhiteposted 2 years ago

    They lack the experience in life and full education to have the best odds of a good outcome for their children.
    Studies have shown that to have odds less than 10% of being in poverty, you need to: not have children out of wedlock, finish high school, not get married until you are 20, at least one spouse works full time.

  4. WordCrafter09 profile image76
    WordCrafter09posted 2 years ago

    My immediate reaction to this question is, "That was then.  This is now."  (I should probably add,  "This is the U.S, by the way" (so I'm basing my reply not just on "these days" but also on what's going on in the U.S.".  Since I don't think "what I think about mothers" is really the point, and since there's already so much information "out there" about the challenges and disadvantages teen mothers face, I'd rather save my ideas about all that for a Hub (and if I never write a Hub on those there's already tons of information and opinions about there anyway).

    As far as studies go, I think many teens don't pay attention to them anyway; but even if some adult manages to get them to pay attention it's generally in the nature of young people to think the "bad stuff" isn't going to happen to them.

    In general, I think the right teen mother with the right people/person as part of her "support system", can (with a lot of "if's") find a way to get herself and her child (one child) to an OK-enough place/situation.

    The one, kind of insidious, challenge/disadvantage that I don't hear too many people talk about is that the younger someone is when she becomes a mother, the more likely she is to see her child as "all grown-up" when, in fact, that child is still far from grown-up.  There are already so many people in our society today who haven't seemed to sort out what's "all grown-up/mature" (intellectually, emotionally, and/or physically") or where any of the lines between any of those things are with each child.

    So many people over-estimated children's emotional maturity while under-estimating their intellectual maturity.  OR, they interpret increasingly apparent physical maturity as the measure of "grown-up".  This isn't just something that goes on with teen mothers toward their own child.  In fact, teen mothers are often the products of mothers who, themselves, encouraged or contributed (sometimes by example) their teen daughters to see themselves as "all grown-up" , ready to be a mother and even all prepared to do it right.

    The thing too few people talk about is how a twenty-six-year-mother will see her ten-year-old child as "all grown up" (or close to it) while, say, a thirty-six or forty-one-year mother has come to realize how young ten (or three or sixteen or twenty) really is.

    I think this continues, or even starts, a chain/cycle that gets harder and harder to break (and brings new and different disadvantages/challenges as time goes on.)

  5. Happylovejoy profile image98
    Happylovejoyposted 2 years ago

    I try not to be judgmental about teen moms (it is a huge sacrifice to be a mom at such a young age, and one must be brave enough to make the decision to keep the baby if the pregnancy was not planned).

    However, I generally would not think it is a good idea because teen years and early twenty years are one of the most confusing times in our lives. We are still trying to figure out who we are and what we want to do in life.

    To not be certain of who you are, while carrying the heavy responsibility of taking care of and shaping another human being's life may not be the best idea.

  6. peachpurple profile image83
    peachpurpleposted 2 years ago

    teen mums are common nowadays, parents would take care of the single mum with her child.

    However, teen mums are reckless, careless, tend to put her child under her parents care

    1. profile image60
      peter565posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      True, I think this is one of the reason, in the older days they believe a wife should obey her husband, because although the mum was 14 or 15 the dad most likely is 19 or 20 more responsible

 
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