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Do you like it when worship leaders take a secular song and make it into a worsh

  1. MarleneB profile image97
    MarleneBposted 5 years ago

    Do you like it when worship leaders take a secular song and make it into a worship song?

    When a worship leader takes a secular song and changes the lyrics to make it a worship song, do you like it or do you feel it is sacrilegious?

  2. manatita44 profile image84
    manatita44posted 5 years ago

    Hi Marlene. Greetings!
    Paths are different. Some devotees dance so much to religious songs that one would think that parts of their bodies will break. Others like gregorian chants, and yet others like classical orientated music for meditation.
    Songs of worsip in my Path, are those which instill an immediate and certain response in the Soul. Alas! Many of todays music stimulate the mind. They make us jolly and happy, perhaps, for a short while, but do not last. Still, there are those who are very mental right now and these kinds of music will suit them.
    My teacher used to say: "I have come from the no-dancing school." Many of our songs would be of such a sublime or lofty nature, as to immediately lift us up. Sri Chinmoy used to ask for soulfulness, gratitude, confidence, purity ... etc., in a song. The devotional songs or songs dedicated to God, tends to be in this nature.
    As a guide, watch your body movements and see if you tend to want to 'boogy' when you hear the song. But, yes, some people are happy with doing this.
    I would say that 'Amazing Grace' is a great song. It addresses and glorifies Grace or God. There are many others like this.
    Throughout the centuries, songs and stories have been embellished and do help us. So if the worship leader is changing it and it falls within the category of elevating our spirits (not minds), then it is useful.

    1. MarleneB profile image97
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You said it and I agree. The key is to note whether the song elevates our spirits and not our minds.

  3. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image96
    Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 years ago

    I don't think it is a problem at all.

    You know, at the church I grew up in they were always singing a tune where the main phrase goes, "And I ain't got no home in this world anymore."

    Well...I had no idea someone had adapted that from a Woody Guthrie tune, and once after I found out, I was listening to the original, and my father heard me and was somewhat angry - he thought I'd changed the church tune into a secular tune!

    1. MarleneB profile image97
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's a fun story. I guess it is all about the world we live in. But, I'm with you. When I was a worship leader I didn't think it was a problem, but I was asked politely not to do it.

  4. profile image0
    Rayne123posted 5 years ago

    Well not quite sure of your definition of "worship leaders" however I get a vivid picture of someone being worshiped other than God or thinking they are God.

    1. manatita44 profile image84
      manatita44posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No need for this, Rayne 123.. Without  a leader or co-ordinator in your employment, the whole thing would fall to pieces. God appoint leaders, too.

    2. MarleneB profile image97
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      OK, Rayne123 - I co-ordinated the music program for the church. I was the band leader and we sang songs in front of the congregation. That's what they call a worship leader - a person who leads in worship.

    3. profile image0
      Rayne123posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      oh ok gotcha , then it brings my answer to a whole different stand point.

      I do not find anything wrong with it as long as the change of lyrics symbolizes the whole meaning of the song.

    4. MarleneB profile image97
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, Rayne123, and now that you understand more about the question, it makes your first answer kind of humorous. I hope you take my comment to mean, 'Thank you for coming back.' I agree with you on your second answer.

    5. profile image0
      Rayne123posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      yes it does sound silly now that I have read it over again.
      Sorry about that

      Have a good one.

  5. X-Con profile image79
    X-Conposted 5 years ago

    Not at all! We should strive to elevate the world to God's standards, and not lower God's standards to the standards of the world.

    1. MarleneB profile image97
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I like that! Yes. We need to remember to strive for a higher level. I think God loves it when we worship him no matter what the melody is.

  6. Michael-Milec profile image59
    Michael-Milecposted 5 years ago

    As long as a " secular song's music " is written under the anointing of the Holy Spirit, and the lyrics of the song do exolt, glorify and magnify the Most High God to the point that
                     His  glory  fills the Temple, ( 2. Chron . 5: 13.14 )-- it's OK with me.
    You know and mostly all the children of God do, that not everything labeled as             " worship "  means many  other things but the holy glorification. Worship isn't about our feelings it's about honoring YHWH . Whenever this happenes the manifestation of His presence makes lasting changes on those present, so that the outsider notice ,  that " they were in  fellowship with the God and His saints ."

    1. MarleneB profile image97
      MarleneBposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      AMEN! "Worship isn't about our feelings it's about honoring YHWH." (Translation for some readers, YHWH = God.)

 
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