Any bowl game looked forward to? Any prediction? Why?

Jump to Last Post 1-4 of 4 discussions (5 posts)
  1. tsmog profile image79
    tsmogposted 21 months ago

    Any bowl game looked forward to? Any prediction? Why?

  2. simplehappylife profile image82
    simplehappylifeposted 21 months ago

    The Peach Bowl smile

    Alabama is my team.  They are the reason I watch football, I never miss a game.  It's super fun to watch in person, but I can't always afford that (◠‿◠✿)  and of course, I think Bama will win it (although, the huskies might be a little tougher than expected in the beginning). 

    In the end, I think Bama will win the whole thing by the time it is all said and done.

    You?

    1. tsmog profile image79
      tsmogposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      I think I will watch the same game as 'Bama is in my top three teams to follow. I watched the Sun Bowl yesterday because CBS in my neck of the woods had it scheduled. I only have basic cable. So, probably will see the Rose Bowl too.

  3. Kathleen Cochran profile image80
    Kathleen Cochranposted 21 months ago

    Hoping to see Alabama face Clemson for the title this year, and even though I bleed SEC usually (GEORGIA '76) I'd like to see Clemson on top this time. 

    Somebody riddle me this, please?  If Jacob Eason (GEORGIA's QB) was the number 1 pick coming out of high school last year, why did he pick us when he could have gone to Alabama or his home state, Washington?  They are both in the play offs and we (GEORGIA) didn't even beat our biggest rival, GA Tech, this year?

  4. alancaster149 profile image86
    alancaster149posted 21 months ago

    How many across 'the Pond' know about the link between Baseball and Cricket? How many again know where the first international Baseball game was held, and where the first Cricket International. Thirdly how many know why Baseball became a national sport in the US?
    There's a book by American author(ess) Beth Hise about the relationship between Baseball and Cricket - google the name - and where it all started. The first cricket match was held in Surrey, England, in the 16th Century. A pretty basic thing then, Cricket was all about a batsman with a weirdly-shaped instrument more like a twisted baseball bat trying to fend off a bowler who aimed under-arm at a small gate in a field.
    Flash forward three hundred years to New York, a team of Americans played another from Canada in a more advanced game of cricket. Some time later a first international Baseball match was held at Wembley, Middlesex, between England and the US. Cricket was played in the US up until the Civil War, when due to the nature of the cricket ground needed Baseball became more popular with Americans. Cricket's still played in the US, mostly east and west coast, English expats and US players alike. Stephen Stills, of CSN&Y fame, arrived at the Lord's (Cricket) Museum a few years ago during a tea break in a match. Cricket has spread across the Continent to unlikely places such as the Netherlands (some of the best Continental players), France, Germany and Austria - a Sri Lankan hotel worker got them hooked at a place called Velden-am-Woerthersee, I met him once - as well as Corfu off Greece, where Prince Philip was born over 90 years ago.
    My own county team is Yorkshire, knocked off the top spot by Middlesex at the end of the 2016 season - we'll get it back. First Class Cricket Internationals are played between teams from Australia, Bangladesh, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa and Sri Lanka and England (which includes players from Glamorgan and Monmouthshire in South Wales). Cricket took time to reach Yorkshire early in the 19th Century, and Durham only put together a team for the county championships in the 20th. Some counties never took to it as a whole, like Devon, Cornwall, Cumbria, Norfolk, Northumberland and Rutland. We have two divisions according to skill level and win rates (like association football, what in the US is called 'Soccer').   
    Get the Beth Hise book from the Lord's bookshop, google it and see for yourself (I don't get commission, I was a museum steward).

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)