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How To Fix Certain Problems Viruses Cause In Your System

Updated on June 19, 2013

Tough Malware - Removed, But Left A Mess Behind?

It is well known that computer users face a tough enemy everyday; worms, viruses and spyware are always threats, no matter if the system is protected by security suites, antivirus or antispyware. These softwares can prevent intrusion but they cannot make sure that your system is safe. Actually, there is no safe system anywhere - that does not mean that security software is not useful, however.
Today’s security applications are very good at identifying threats and countering them, but they are not strong enough with dealing with “minor” fixes that need to be done after a virus has been removed. In fact, virus leftovers are not cleaned thoroughly and registry changes are not always reversed and that could introduce some annoying effects on computer systems.

Common problem and annoying change that can occur from malware is unwanted actions on file and folder settings; system might not remember anymore your folder settings, or files can go hidden and make you worried that you have lost your data. Other problems include file search (it can be disabled), command line problems and disabled registry editor, while the most popular of all issues is an affected Task Manager – it will refuse to load.

Such changes, as you understand, are more or less harmless; however, they can cause serious annoyance to the user, who could even decide to format the system and start from scratch, instead of attempting to fix the issues caused.

The interface of the free software Quick Disaster Recovery is simple and offers ease of use.
The interface of the free software Quick Disaster Recovery is simple and offers ease of use.

A Useful Little Tool

It is apparent, therefore, that there is a need for an utility which can revert things back to normal. An application which will be able to bypass the problems caused and eventually repair them, bringing back normal functionality and peace of mind to the system owner.

Quick Disaster Recovery can help you deal with these annoying problems after you have dealt with the malware itself through your security software. It can run on all Windows platforms and operating systems after 2000/XP, 32 or 64 bit. Its interface is simplistic and easy for use – even a beginner user can identify at once what each button does and opt to make the fixes. The program offers buttons with particular fixes, and if a problem is not found present, the relative button/fix is gray and cannot be clicked. As you will notice in the picture, the system on which the software was used had no security issues and altered settings, so all fixes are on gray.

Task Manager replacement is handy when your windows task manager is disabled due to virus or other malware actions.
Task Manager replacement is handy when your windows task manager is disabled due to virus or other malware actions.

The Graphical Interface

On the right side of the User Interface you will find two buttons which are always active; the first can be used to delete all temporary files, which are leftover junk from your internet surfing, and the second is a Task Manager replacement, which can prove extremely useful in cases when the real Task Manager is gone. Therefore, by using this option you can stop harmful processes and aid their removal from your security software, even if the Windows task manager has been disabled.

Removal of temporary files will make your system run smoother and faster and possibly protect you from harmful nasty surprises which tend to linger around in that area of browser cache. Of course, there are dedicated software solutions which deal with cleaning system junk, but it is very easy to accomplish it through this program.

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    • DakshaDesign profile image

      DakshaDesign 4 years ago from Chandigarh, India

      Great read here! I appreciate you making this nice hub.

    • treebark profile image

      treebark 4 years ago from Factoryville

      Hey, maybe you can help? I have some sort of virus in my Adobe flash player in Google chrome. I have a Norton antivirus but this does not seem to help.

      If I use Firefox with a separate Adobe flash player my videos play fine. If I use Google chrome the video portion slows down when I go to full screen and the audio is clipped. I have uninstalled and reinstalled Google chrome with no effect. I actually do not know if it is a virus or a problem with Google chrome. What do you think?

    • CyberFreak profile image
      Author

      CyberFreak 4 years ago

      Hello treebark. Your problem doesn't seem related to viruses; clipped audio and chocking video generally is a sign of something which is consuming resources. I suspect that your chrome has either many toolbars, or other stuff which check their server often and generate temporary cpu slowdown. If this is not right, then I suggest you remove your chrome add-ons starting with your flash, then installing again one by one. I have also noticed some systems tend to not like latest adobe flash so you might opt to install a previous flash version. I hope you sort out your computer problem.

    • treebark profile image

      treebark 4 years ago from Factoryville

      hi, wow thanks for your rapid response. Unfortunately the Adobe flash player is not an add-on but is "part of Google chrome" I actually don't have many add-ons. I disabled one I had. That didn't work. I have a lot of bookmarks. I do not know if this affects anything.

      I wish customer service for anything I ever purchased responded as quickly as you did! You gave me very valuable information and I thank you!

    • CyberFreak profile image
      Author

      CyberFreak 4 years ago

      Thank you for your kind words. Bookmarks do not affect the browser in that way. I am not a fan of Chrome (for some months I could load no site through Chrome for no apparent reason so I stopped using it). Maybe you can try to get a previous Chrome version. By the way, it will not hurt scanning for viruses anyway, right? It is just that viruses would affect firefox too, if they were to blame.

    • treebark profile image

      treebark 4 years ago from Factoryville

      I have already scanned for viruses three separate times.

      If you don't mind my asking, what browser do you use?

      Thank you very much,

      treebark

    • CyberFreak profile image
      Author

      CyberFreak 4 years ago

      I use Firefox as main browser, but I also have installed others; sometimes I use Maxthon when something doesn't load properly in Firefox, others I use Opera. I have tried Chrome, Flock, K-meleon, Safari and a very lightweight one called TheWorld. I prefer Firefox, but sometimes it is heavy for older systems.

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