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Solar Advantages

  1. Makemoneycashflow profile image61
    Makemoneycashflowposted 7 years ago

    Introduction to Solar Energy

    Solar Power is a form of energy and is generated by the sun. This kind of energy can be harnessed using cells and converted into electricity or thermal energy. It is the earth�s most available energy source and can easily be taken advantage of. If you live in a particularly sunny area (sunny most days) then you can definitely take advantage of solar power. Other forms of energy e.g. wind and tidal are much harder to harness, especially for the use of a home. They would require much more investment and the output wouldn�t be as much.

    Advantages of Solar Power

    Solar Power has many advantages, and already many firms and organisations in the world use this form of energy as an alternative. One of the advantages already mentioned is that it is the earth�s most available energy source. This is because the sun is present every day, week in week out. The amount of energy given out by the sun is immense; using it for personal uses (domestic use) wouldn�t affect the resulting amount left. Solar Power is inexhaustible, which means we could use it for the rest of our lives, and our children�s lives, and so on. No pollution. What more could be asked of an energy source? Government organisations around the world want to reduce pollution, our planet is being affected; climate change is occurring. With solar power this problem can be demolished! Of course the entire world population would have to switch to solar power, a task which would take much time and money. But, if you become one of the people to start using solar power then maybe, little by little, solar power will become the main source of energy. That is the goal!

    Make Your Homemade Solar Panels

    So, how can you turn to solar power? You may believe that it will be too complicated, expensive or even time consuming to set up solar power systems and panels. The reality is that it doesn�t have to be any of these, as guides are being offered on the internet. The best way to start is by making solar panels. Yes, that�s making, not buying. Solar panels cost about $10,000 each (and that�s being generous), and there�s no point even discussing the installation fees. So, unless you�re filthy rich, the best option to take is to make your own solar panels (plus, it�s more fun!).

    GreenDIYenergy is a company offering a high quality guide on how to make your own solar panel(s). This is a mixture of videos, pictures, diagrams and schematics, making it all the more easier to follow. The guide is split into three parts: Solar Panel Systems, The �$98 Solar Panel� Guide and the �Solar Energy Bundle�. The Solar Panel Systems guide will teach how solar energy is produced and how you will produce your solar panel system. The �$98 Solar Panel� guide will teach you how to make the solar panels from scratch, using purchasable materials. This is personally the best part in my opinion, gets really fun! The final guide, �Solar Energy Bundle�, includes resources to help you along the way and how to connect up your solar panels. You can create your entire solar panel system! It also includes information on solar tax credits and rebates. Not to mention the bonuses: Video guide and Build your own wind turbine guide! The cost of electricity is increasing. Just imagine the amount of money which can be saved on your current energy bills. You could cut 50% off from making your own solar panels, and maybe one day by 100%. It�s time for you to go GREEN, and make your own solar panels today.

    Making your own solar panels is fun, and the advantages are there to reap. You can make them with friends and family, enjoy the experience. Imagine making them with your children, knowing when they grow they would know the benefits about solar power. This could lead them on to make their own solar panels, and so spread the message about the most available energy source available to us.

    Hope this was helpful to you all!

  2. Leelin profile image61
    Leelinposted 7 years ago

    What's up with all the little question mark thingys anyway?

  3. Makemoneycashflow profile image61
    Makemoneycashflowposted 7 years ago

    Im actually not sure, I don't think it recognises the letters!

  4. profile image61
    life enrichposted 7 years ago

    Solving Solar-power Issues
    Certainly, no one would accept only having electricity during the day, and then only on clear days, if they have a choice. We need energy storage -- batteries. Unfortunately, batteries add a lot of cost and maintenance to the PV system. Currently, however, it's a necessity if you want to be completely independent. One way around the problem is to connect your house to the utility grid, buying power when you need it and selling to them when you produce more than you need. This way, the utility acts as a practically infinite storage system. The utility has to agree, of course, and in most cases will buy power from you at a much lower price than their own selling price. You will also need special equipment to make sure that the power you sell to your utility is synchronous with theirs -- that it shares the same sinusoidal waveform and frequency. Safety is an issue as well. The utility has to make sure that if there's a power outage in your neighborhood, your PV system won't try to feed electricity into lines that a lineman may think is dead. This is called islanding.
    If you decide to use batteries, keep in mind that they will have to be maintained, and then replaced after a certain number of years. The PV modules should last 20 years or more, but batteries just don't have that kind of useful life. Batteries in PV systems can also be very dangerous because of the energy they store and the acidic electrolytes they contain, so you'll need a well-ventilated, non-metallic enclosure for them.
    Although several different kinds of batteries are commonly used, the one characteristic they should all have in common is that they are deep-cycle batteries. Unlike your car battery, which is a shallow-cycle battery, deep-cycle batteries can discharge more of their stored energy while still maintaining long life. Car batteries discharge a large current for a very short time -- to start your car -- and are then immediately recharged as you drive. PV batteries generally have to discharge a smaller current for a longer period (such as all night), while being charged during the day.
    The most commonly used deep-cycle batteries are lead-acid batteries (both sealed and vented) and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel-cadmium batteries are more expensive, but last longer and can be discharged more completely without harm. Even deep-cycle lead-acid batteries can't be discharged 100 percent without seriously shortening battery life, and generally, PV systems are designed to discharge lead-acid batteries no more than 40 percent or 50 percent.
    Also, the use of batteries requires the installation of another component called a charge controller. Batteries last a lot longer if care is taken so that they aren't overcharged or drained too much. That's what a charge controller does. Once the batteries into them. Similarly, once the batteries have been drained to a certain predetermined level, controlled by measuring battery voltage, many charge controllers will not allow more current to be drained from the batteries until they have been recharged. The use of a charge controller is essential for long battery life. sureshbhatt

  5. profile image61
    life enrichposted 7 years ago

    Solving Solar-power Issues
    Certainly, no one would accept only having electricity during the day, and then only on clear days, if they have a choice. We need energy storage -- batteries. Unfortunately, batteries add a lot of cost and maintenance to the PV system. Currently, however, it's a necessity if you want to be completely independent. One way around the problem is to connect your house to the utility grid, buying power when you need it and selling to them when you produce more than you need. This way, the utility acts as a practically infinite storage system. The utility has to agree, of course, and in most cases will buy power from you at a much lower price than their own selling price. You will also need special equipment to make sure that the power you sell to your utility is synchronous with theirs -- that it shares the same sinusoidal waveform and frequency. Safety is an issue as well. The utility has to make sure that if there's a power outage in your neighborhood, your PV system won't try to feed electricity into lines that a lineman may think is dead. This is called islanding.
    If you decide to use batteries, keep in mind that they will have to be maintained, and then replaced after a certain number of years. The PV modules should last 20 years or more, but batteries just don't have that kind of useful life. Batteries in PV systems can also be very dangerous because of the energy they store and the acidic electrolytes they contain, so you'll need a well-ventilated, non-metallic enclosure for them.
    Although several different kinds of batteries are commonly used, the one characteristic they should all have in common is that they are deep-cycle batteries. Unlike your car battery, which is a shallow-cycle battery, deep-cycle batteries can discharge more of their stored energy while still maintaining long life. Car batteries discharge a large current for a very short time -- to start your car -- and are then immediately recharged as you drive. PV batteries generally have to discharge a smaller current for a longer period (such as all night), while being charged during the day.
    The most commonly used deep-cycle batteries are lead-acid batteries (both sealed and vented) and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel-cadmium batteries are more expensive, but last longer and can be discharged more completely without harm. Even deep-cycle lead-acid batteries can't be discharged 100 percent without seriously shortening battery life, and generally, PV systems are designed to discharge lead-acid batteries no more than 40 percent or 50 percent.
    Also, the use of batteries requires the installation of another component called a charge controller. Batteries last a lot longer if care is taken so that they aren't overcharged or drained too much. That's what a charge controller does. Once the batteries into them. Similarly, once the batteries have been drained to a certain predetermined level, controlled by measuring battery voltage, many charge controllers will not allow more current to be drained from the batteries until they have been recharged. The use of a charge controller is essential for long battery life. sureshbhatt

  6. profile image61
    life enrichposted 7 years ago

    Solving Solar-power Issues
    Certainly, no one would accept only having electricity during the day, and then only on clear days, if they have a choice. We need energy storage -- batteries. Unfortunately, batteries add a lot of cost and maintenance to the PV system. Currently, however, it's a necessity if you want to be completely independent. One way around the problem is to connect your house to the utility grid, buying power when you need it and selling to them when you produce more than you need. This way, the utility acts as a practically infinite storage system. The utility has to agree, of course, and in most cases will buy power from you at a much lower price than their own selling price. You will also need special equipment to make sure that the power you sell to your utility is synchronous with theirs -- that it shares the same sinusoidal waveform and frequency. Safety is an issue as well. The utility has to make sure that if there's a power outage in your neighborhood, your PV system won't try to feed electricity into lines that a lineman may think is dead. This is called islanding.
    If you decide to use batteries, keep in mind that they will have to be maintained, and then replaced after a certain number of years. The PV modules should last 20 years or more, but batteries just don't have that kind of useful life. Batteries in PV systems can also be very dangerous because of the energy they store and the acidic electrolytes they contain, so you'll need a well-ventilated, non-metallic enclosure for them.
    Although several different kinds of batteries are commonly used, the one characteristic they should all have in common is that they are deep-cycle batteries. Unlike your car battery, which is a shallow-cycle battery, deep-cycle batteries can discharge more of their stored energy while still maintaining long life. Car batteries discharge a large current for a very short time -- to start your car -- and are then immediately recharged as you drive. PV batteries generally have to discharge a smaller current for a longer period (such as all night), while being charged during the day.
    The most commonly used deep-cycle batteries are lead-acid batteries (both sealed and vented) and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel-cadmium batteries are more expensive, but last longer and can be discharged more completely without harm. Even deep-cycle lead-acid batteries can't be discharged 100 percent without seriously shortening battery life, and generally, PV systems are designed to discharge lead-acid batteries no more than 40 percent or 50 percent.
    Also, the use of batteries requires the installation of another component called a charge controller. Batteries last a lot longer if care is taken so that they aren't overcharged or drained too much. That's what a charge controller does. Once the batteries into them. Similarly, once the batteries have been drained to a certain predetermined level, controlled by measuring battery voltage, many charge controllers will not allow more current to be drained from the batteries until they have been recharged. The use of a charge controller is essential for long battery life. sureshbhatt

 
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