jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (8 posts)

On Installing Two Virus Guards On Your Computer

  1. quicksand profile image78
    quicksandposted 4 years ago

    On Installing Two Virus Guards On Your Computer

    My friend has installed two dissimilar virus guards on his computer saying two guards will perform better than a solitary guard! (As what happens in real life!) His logic sounds right but I would not do likewise as I believe this could cause a malfunction of some sort. What are your views?

  2. Thief12 profile image90
    Thief12posted 4 years ago

    You're not supposed to have two antivirus software in your computer. It can affect overall performance and maybe even prevent the computer from starting. You can, however, have an antivirus (like Norton, AVG, Avast, Microsoft Security Essentials, etc.) and an anti-spyware (like Ad-Aware, Malwarebytes, etc.) to complement.

    I wrote a related hub a while ago. You can check it out.
    http://hubpages.com/hub/Malware-What-it … al-with-it

    1. NotPC profile image59
      NotPCposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      This dude knows what's up.

    2. quicksand profile image78
      quicksandposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Thief12, he had installed McCafee as he says that while approving an Adobe application to install, he had failed to untick some option which had resulted in the installation of the second virus guard. I shall check out your article too. Thanks! smile

  3. Daffitt profile image69
    Daffittposted 4 years ago

    Hello Quicksand,

    Thief12 is correct in his response to this question. In the analogy you gave (the guards), the problem arises when they both detect a disturbance on the premises at the same time. As they seek out the source of the disturbance, they could end up shooting each other. In the case of antivirus software, you end up, as Thief12 said, slowing down system performance and risking other security issues.

    The best way to deal with the issue of system security is to use a well-established and reliable internet security suite. You want to use something that has a long history of reliability and success, such as the Norton Internet Security or Norton 360 products. Using those so-called “free” security products are more than likely to cause you more harm than good. Always remember that there is an opportunity cost to everything. If it is free, there is a greater cost somewhere else. I wrote about a free trial version of a popular product that turned out to have a virus in it in this hub page at:

    http://daffitt.hubpages.com/hub/PremiereElements9Virus

    1. quicksand profile image78
      quicksandposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Daffitt, the second virus guard had installed itself without my friend's knowledge as he had failed to untick some option. As I have stated above, he already has Microsoft's virus guard installed in his system. I shall check out your article too.

  4. jaydawg808 profile image89
    jaydawg808posted 4 years ago

    Your friend is deeply wrong.  His logic, while sounds good, isn't correct in practice in the computer world.  You'll have more problems having more than one anti-virus software installed.

    1. quicksand profile image78
      quicksandposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, I too advised him to remove the latter as he already had Microsoft's virus guard installed. Thanks Jaydawg808.

 
working