Windows 11

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  1. bravewarrior profile image91
    bravewarriorposted 11 months ago

    I recently took advantage of the free upgrade to Windows 11. So far, I find it to be much more user friendly than Windows 10.

    Has anyone else upgraded? What are your thoughts on the differences?

    1. theraggededge profile image96
      theraggededgeposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Laptop wanted to install it last night but I declined (for now) after it said that some programs and apps may not run properly.

      Is everything working for you?

      1. bravewarrior profile image91
        bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        Bev, check out what's different. You can do so without downloading, which is what I did. The features that are no longer available I don't use, so it was no big deal for me. Click on the "learn more" link to see what the changes are and whether or not they affect your user habits, and make your decision from there.

        1. bravewarrior profile image91
          bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          To answer your question: yes, everything seems to be working.

    2. tsmog profile image78
      tsmogposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      MS says they can't upgrade me to Windows 11 without any reason why. I have the hardware your suppose to have to my knowledge. So, I'm out of luck.

      1. bravewarrior profile image91
        bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        What version of Windows are you currently running?

        1. tsmog profile image78
          tsmogposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Just saw this comment. Inspired by your sharing support will end 2025 I did some poking about. Yes, I do have Windows 10 today, but it is a 32 bit architecture and not 64. Windows 10 came in both.

          Windows 11 is only a 64 bit architecture. Windows 11 upgrade from MS is just that an upgrade, so it writes the new system on top of the old Windows 10 making necessary changes. For me to get it it would have to be a clean install, thus formatting my hard drive (SDD). So, everything would be wiped out as it exists today.

          1. bravewarrior profile image91
            bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

            Bummer!

          2. eugbug profile image96
            eugbugposted 11 months agoin reply to this

            So no support for older 32 bit applications? (I've got a ton of those)

            1. bravewarrior profile image91
              bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

              I would double-check that, Eugene, but 32 bit is pretty antiquated as far as today's technology goes.

              1. eugbug profile image96
                eugbugposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                It means having to buy new software though. For instance I use the 32 bit Paint Shop Pro and it runs fast on a fast machine. 64 bit technology isn't going to improve performance noticeably. The older version of Cobian Backup before it was sold is also 32 bit.

                1. bravewarrior profile image91
                  bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  Glad it works for you, Eugene. I've been running 64 bit for years.

                2. tsmog profile image78
                  tsmogposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  You can run 32 bit software on a 64 bit operating system from my research. It is recommended to update drivers to the latest date. A problem for me is losing software that I can't reinstall because the license is expired. Tight budget and all that to purchase again.

                  On Windows 10 64 bit or Windows 11 means it can make use more ram than 4 GB that a 32 bit OS is limited to. So, your Paint Shop Pro would run better if you have more RAM. Bravewarrior is right new stuff since about 2008 came OEM with Windows 10 64.

    3. Kenna McHugh profile image90
      Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      I upgraded, and no problems. It's different, but everything is fine.

      1. bravewarrior profile image91
        bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        I like the dashboard (or whatever that thing at the bottom is called) so much better than Windows 10. Ten was confusing. Eleven is pretty straight-forward. I had no problem figuring out how to navigate.

        1. Kenna McHugh profile image90
          Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Yup! I still have 10 on my desktop. When I go back and forth, which I often do, as I work on two projects simultaneously, I am reminded of how easy 11 is when I go back to my laptop.

          1. bravewarrior profile image91
            bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

            I agree, Kenna. Windows 11 is much easier to navigate. When I went from 7 to 10 I was totally confused. Nothing made sense. Now it all does again.

            I'm old school. I only access the Internet and write while using my desktop. I don't do any of that on my phone. Call, text, and take photos, that's about it. I don't read on my phone because everything is way too small. I much prefer my 17" desktop monitor.

            1. Kenna McHugh profile image90
              Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

              Now that you mention it, BraveWarrior, 7 to 10 was confusing. Yes. 11 is much smoother. My desktop has three monitors. It is so much faster to research and write. I use my phone for FB, texting, checking my sites, photos, and calls. I also use it for my Kindle.

              1. bravewarrior profile image91
                bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                +1. Eleven is much more like seven.

                1. Kenna McHugh profile image90
                  Kenna McHughposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  I agree.

                2. Titia profile image92
                  Titiaposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  Glad to hear that 11 is much more like 7. I still use 7 on my desktop. I have 10 on my laptop, but I hate it.

  2. eugbug profile image96
    eugbugposted 11 months ago

    No, I spent probably a month of work in total this year resetting, repairing and then reinstalling Windows 10 from scratch four times after various components of the OS malfunctioned. I also had BSOD on a couple of occasions. My hard drive had a slowly increasing number of bad sectors and possibly Windows files in those sectors were getting corrupted. I replaced the drive with an SSD and now it's lightning fast rebooting and doing other stuff. So far I've had no issues, but I can't rule out the possibility that Windows updates during the year had caused the problems. From discussions on forums, lots of people had issues with stuff not working properly after updating their machines. If it ain't broken, don't fix it is my philosophy, no matter how wonderful Microsoft claims ver 11 to be.

    1. bravewarrior profile image91
      bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Eugene, I waited years before installing Windows 10 from Windows 7. I had no problems, but found the new format confusing. Windows 11 seems to be simplified and straight-forward.

      Windows 10 will continue to be supported until 2025, so there's time, but I'd guess that waiting until the enth hour will result in a charge rather than a free upgrade.

      Here are a couple of links that may help when deciding whether or not to upgrade:

      https://www.cnet.com/tech/computing/win … osofts-os/

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8rmHjY_-1E

      Hope these help.

  3. Jodah profile image89
    Jodahposted 11 months ago

    I had the message come up that a free upgrade was available so I read a few reviews. They seemed to be mostly positive, but more or less said changes were quite minor. Said it felt a bit more like Windows 8 than 10 though.They didn’t really help me decide so I thought I’d wait awhile.
    You have almost convinced me to give it a go, Shauna.

    1. bravewarrior profile image91
      bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      John, I waited until Windows 10 was a paid upgrade, because I was trepidatious. I actually found a work-around to not have to pay. I wasn't pleased with Windows 10. It's very confusing and not user friendly. However, Windows 11 is very easy to navigate. You don't have to think like a computer to know which buttons to push. The dashbar at the bottom of the page is wonderful. It thinks like a human, not a computer.

    2. bravewarrior profile image91
      bravewarriorposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      So far, I have no regrets, John.

  4. Jodah profile image89
    Jodahposted 11 months ago

    Sounds good then

 
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