Preserve Your Place in the Global Economy

Tired of your current job? by rlz
Tired of your current job? by rlz

As we all recover from this past year or more of economic distress, how do you preserve your place in the newly evolving global economy? How do you insure that you can provide for yourself and your family in years to come. Here are some tips that can help.

First, you might head toward the essential fields and careers of tomorrow. Health care, in all its many aspects, will remain a good source of the better-paying jobs of the future. Demand for nurses, physician assistants, and medical equipment technicians will stay strong throughout most major cities in coming decades. Physical therapists are in ever-growing need, as are pharmacists. Engineers of all types are required for our burgeoning fields of energy production, materials science, infrastructure maintenance, medical equipment, and biotechnology. Such varied careers as firefighters, hair stylists and veterinarians will remain strong. So too will many sectors of the service industries.

Next, you might head towards those cities that are likely to be the best of job providers both in the short term and over the long haul. Such mega-cities as New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, and Houston, of course, will always be able to provide jobs to many newcomers, as will San Francisco, Denver, Seattle, Portland, Phoenix and Austin. But, surprisingly, such lesser lights as Durham, Columbus, Anchorage, Laredo, Morgantown, Tallahassee and Oklahoma City will also be able to provide fine jobs in a number of select fields. Survey some of the many national and regional reviewers of job markets for your best selection.

Become aware of the job market and your likely place in it. Stay in tune with the shifting tides of the economy and its impact on employment. Know what people in your field and related fields are paid, what benefits they earn, what duties they perform, what skills they need, and what their long term employment and development prospects are. Watch those around you to see how others are coping (or not) with the business world and coming employment opportunities.

Become knowledgeable, in your field, and out of it. Pursue continuing education or specialized training. Go back to school, or seek on-the-job training or advancement opportunities. Add some peripheral skills to what you already know, skills that could help you transition sideways to another career, should circumstances demand. Learn what your boss knows, and what HIS boss knows. Make yourself essential.

Become proactive. Don’t wait for that dreaded pink slip, or that Friday-afternoon summons into your boss’ office. Find out what you can do to make your job more secure, and your next, better job more likely. Take on additional responsibilities. Become an effective team player. Solve your boss’ and your coworkers’ problems before they even know they have them. Keep a positive, forward-thinking, forward-moving mentality.

Maintain positive relationships. Even if you lose your job, keep whatever contacts you can. Don’t burn bridges. Often your next job will come through contacts from your old job. Stay in contact and on good terms with all those around you who might assist in your gaining your next position.

Become underextended. If you sense that your job may be in jeopardy, or that you may have to make a transition to a new position or field, then pull in your horns. Cut back on any significant financial, psychological or emotional investments, to harbor your resources for the job struggle that might lie ahead.

Plan your future, then work the plan. Enter the situation of job change with your eyes wide open, with a good solid basis of knowledge and understanding to support your aims, and with the skills and energy and motivation to work through the transition effectively. And tomorrow will present you with great opportunity.

Keep your mood up. Go to rickzworld.

Workin' like a dog? Make a change. by rlz
Workin' like a dog? Make a change. by rlz

More by this Author


No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.

    Click to Rate This Article