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Cockney Rhyming Slang Challenge

  1. kirstenblog profile image79
    kirstenblogposted 7 years ago

    I love rhyming slang and have been trying to get the hang of it.

    As I understand you take a word, rhyme it and use that rhyme word to inspire your slang word.

    Here goes:

    Take the word pence (english pence or p)
    Pence rhymes with fence
    Popular fences include chain link fences
    Pence = chain links

    So today I earned 3 chain links in adsense, for no clicks!

    Got it?
    Good
    Your turn.........

  2. profile image0
    Justine76posted 7 years ago

    sad I dont know english.....
    if someone can point me in the right direction of a translator, Id be happy to play...

    1. profile image0
      bloodnlatexposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I'm just as lost as you...

  3. retellect profile image80
    retellectposted 7 years ago

    Dosh (slang for money)
    Rhymes with posh

    Dosh = Spice

    My bank account is really spicy! smile

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      ummmmm where exactly does the posh fit in? and..
      so dosh=money, why does it = spice?
      but..so you just have to know a slang english word and use it in an american sentence?

      1. profile image0
        bloodnlatexposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Hmmmm....Uhhhh....I'm still lost....

        1. profile image0
          Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Im going back to being a drink...

  4. cally2 profile image61
    cally2posted 7 years ago

    As a true born Cockney (we are named for the size of our genitalia wink)this made me laugh. The whole point of rhyming slang was to make sure that outsiders couldn't understand what was being said. So what happens is that only one part of the rhyme is used and sometimes a rhyme is used for another rhyme. Even my children (who don't live in London) can't really get their heads around it properly. Try this and see if you can translate.

    Woke up this morning pulled on me rounds an' me almonds. Got a clean dickie and made a cup of rosy. Then went for a ball down the frog. Saw me old china an' 'e had a new jam. 'e gave me the lady 'e owed me so we went for a pigs in the rub.

    I could go on. Perhaps I'll do hub on it in the next few days.

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      do a hub, it would be real interesting. Plus maybe you could do a hub about slang and what it means, if that isnt disloyal? Since the purpose of it is to keep outsiders confused, I dont feel so bad, and you should feel good that it works!!

    2. kirstenblog profile image79
      kirstenblogposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Laughing my ass off here! You are the king obviously! I can make out a few I think lol not enough to tell anyone what you are on about tho.

      1. cally2 profile image61
        cally2posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Ok ok I'll do a couple of hubs. One in rhyming slang and one a few days later with translations and explanations. I don't want to make things too easy for you smile

    3. Jo Woodward profile image61
      Jo Woodwardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You got up, got dressed, had a wash, a bit of brekkie and a cup of tea.  You went for a walk down the road, met up with your mate, admired his new car, he paid you back the money he owed you so you took him to the pub.Close enough?

      My favourite ever rhymning slang is 'I ain't anti but......'
      Can you guess what it is yet?

      I'll make you a deal though......you do a hub in rhyming slang and I'll put one together in Black Country.

      1. cally2 profile image61
        cally2posted 7 years ago in reply to this
  5. kirstenblog profile image79
    kirstenblogposted 7 years ago

    Here is another

    Hub rhymes with Pub
    A famous name for a pub, the Queen Vic
    So the rhyming slang might be
    Hub as a Vic

    I finished my 50th Vic today
    or I finished my 50th Queen Vic

  6. cally2 profile image61
    cally2posted 7 years ago

    first one is up

  7. Flightkeeper profile image79
    Flightkeeperposted 7 years ago

    I have a feeling that if one isn't Cockney, and one tries to do the rhyming thing, I can easily insult someone without meaning to smile

  8. kirstenblog profile image79
    kirstenblogposted 7 years ago

    We could call it Hubpages rhyming slang and avoid insulting anyone. Just a thought.

  9. reikial profile image60
    reikialposted 7 years ago

    I was looking at some of your examples and it would seem that, with the exception of the true cockney, you are not quite getting the hang of it. I am not a cockney but have lived in London for over 30 years so here are some easy examples to give you a head start.
    apples and pears = stairs
    Irish Jig = wig
    Barnet Fair = Hair
    Army & Navy = Gravy
    Butchers Hook = look
    Pen & Ink = stink
    sometimes only one word is used as the cockney says, to confuse and confound outsiders.For example: me old mate slap head Harry has got himself an Irish. or I poked me head round the door for a butchers.
    simples
    rhyming slang 101
    ps I look forward to the Hub by cally2

 
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