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Anybody seen this????

  1. RKHenry profile image80
    RKHenryposted 7 years ago
    1. prettydarkhorse profile image62
      prettydarkhorseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Hi RK, i hope and pray they will give the custody to the father, it has been long time and being the only surviving parent he deserve to be with his child, the mother abducted the boy and robbed the father the right to be with the boy, and the boy is already nine, he needs a true biological father who loved him and fights for him through the years,....

      1. RKHenry profile image80
        RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Hey, yeah I cannot imagine why they would not.  He is the biological father, but more importantly a very reliable and loving one at that.  I think that Brazilian leaders might have a serious issue on their hands, if the child isn't returned to his American father.

        1. prettydarkhorse profile image62
          prettydarkhorseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          we will know by noon today,

          1. IntimatEvolution profile image84
            IntimatEvolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Oh, that's good to know.  I do hope it works out.

  2. Tom Cornett profile image54
    Tom Cornettposted 7 years ago

    The natural father's rights should be upheld and custody should be granted to him.

  3. Mortgagestar1 profile image59
    Mortgagestar1posted 7 years ago

    International double standards. I recall when The Clinton Administartion busted little door down with assault rifles. The custody and immigration status of a young Cuban boy, Elián González (born December 6, 1993), was at the center of a heated controversy in 2000 involving the governments of Cuba and the United States, his father, his Miami and Cuban relatives, and the Cuban-American community of Miami. However, a district court's ruling that the Miami relative could not petition for asylum on the boy's behalf was upheld by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, and after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the case, Elián González returned to Cuba with his father, Juan Miguel González Quintana, on June 28, 2000.

    Now we see this!

 
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