jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (20 posts)

Justus

  1. 0
    sandra rinckposted 7 years ago

    I tried to make a request for BDaz, but the question is too long so I can ask it here.

    Justus.  In the Bible Jesus is called Justus.  After Judas had left and they were replacing Judas with another Apostle, they asked that God make there decision for them.  They chose Barnebas (sp?) also called Justus as well as Titus the one who was crucified at the right side of Jesus. 

    Can you explain?

    Acts 1:23, Acts 18:7, Colossians 4:11

    1. Capable Woman profile image81
      Capable Womanposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You mean "Barabas"? Maybe my spelling's wrong too, but "Barnabas" was someone else entirely, I believe.

      1. 0
        sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Yeah. smile

  2. belief713 profile image78
    belief713posted 7 years ago

    Not sure what you want explained... the name Justus?

    What version did you see that in?

    Not sure if this helps any? http://www.biblestudytools.net/Lexicons … ubmit=Find

    1. 0
      sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Sorry.  Why were all three called Justus? Jesus says that He is always with His people.  When they asked God to pick who should replace Judas, God picked Barendabus (sp? sorry) but they also called him Justus.

      When Jesus was hanging for his death, he told Titus that he would be in Heaven before He would.  They also called Titus, Justus.

      And Jesus was also called Justus. 

      So was Jesus always really with them physically.  You know they say that Jesus walks the Earth with us, that His dwelling is with man and be careful how you treat people because it could be Jesus. 

      I know there is a story about this in the Bible as well. 

      Anyways, so the questions is, was it actually Jesus where there was the name Justus?

  3. Make  Money profile image72
    Make Moneyposted 7 years ago

    Hi Sandra, I looked at Acts 1:23, Acts 18:7 and Colossians 4:11 in both the Douay-Rheims Bible and the King James Bible.

    Acts 1:23
    DRB
    23 And they appointed two, Joseph, called Barsabas, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias.
    KJB
    23: And they appointed two, Joseph called Barsabas, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias.

    Acts 18:7
    DRB
    7 And departing thence, he entered into the house of a certain man, named Titus Justus, one that worshipped God, whose house was adjoining to the synagogue.
    KJB
    7: And he departed thence, and entered into a certain man's house, named Justus, one that worshipped God, whose house joined hard to the synagogue.

    Colossians 4:11
    DRB
    11 And Jesus, that is called Justus: who are of the circumcision: these only are my helpers in the kingdom of God; who have been a comfort to me.
    KJB
    11: And Jesus, which is called Justus, who are of the circumcision. These only are my fellowworkers unto the kingdom of God, which have been a comfort unto me.

    In Acts 1:23 the apostles are deciding between Joseph, called Barsabas Justus and Matthias to replace Judas.  They choose Matthias.

    Note in Acts 18:7 of the Douay-Rheims Bible Paul enters into the house of Titus Justus but just Justus in the King James Bible.  So between Acts 1:23 and Acts 18:7 it looks like Justus was a common surname in that day, Barsabas Justus and Titus Justus.

    In Colossians 4 Paul is talking about his disciples or as he calls them here helpers or fellowworkers in the kingdom of God.  Paul mentions Tychicus, Onesimus, Aristarchus, Mark (or Marcus), Barnabus, Jesus (that is called Justus), Epaphras, Luke, Demas and Archippus.  So the Jesus in Colossians 4:11 looks like one of the disciples, not Jesus Christ.  I think Jesus was a common name then as it is in Hispanic communities today.  Also Jesus, that is called Justus in Colossians 4:11 again may be referring to this Jesus' surname as Justus, the same as in Acts 1:23 and Acts 18:7.  Barsabas Justus, Titus Justus and Jesus Justus.  Justus is just mentioned in these 3 verses in the Douay-Rheims Bible, that I can do a search with.

    But Jesus Christ is always with His people through His Holy Spirit.  He sits at the right hand of God the Father.  Yeah Dame Scribe also mentioned in another thread something along this line that you posted, "they say that Jesus walks the Earth with us, that His dwelling is with man and be careful how you treat people because it could be Jesus".  I really like that idea.  Nothing is impossible for God.

    Mike

    1. 0
      sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Ah, that makes sense.  Thanks.

      I just did a name meaning search for the name Justus, which means upright and just.

      Not sure if it was a surname, because I can't think of but only two people with surnames in the bible.  Mary of course, and Jesus. 

      Says Magdalena means, women from Magdala near the Sea of Galilee. 

      But it does sound like a title.

  4. Paraglider profile image87
    Paragliderposted 7 years ago

    Sandra - in this part of the world (not so far from that part of the world) names are not just 'given' name followed by family name. E.g. if Khaled is born to Qreshi, he can be Khaled bin Qreshi, (bin = son of). But if his first born son is named Mosem, his friends will call him abu Mosem, meaning father of Mosem. This is done to honour his bearing of a son and heir. And as for what they were doing 2000 years ago - well, I don't know. But be careful of assuming your norm applies elsewhere and elsewhen. It doesn't wink

    1. 0
      sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      So it is like a title right?

      1. Paraglider profile image87
        Paragliderposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        seems to be. But I never call anyone by the 'abu-(son's name)' formula because I'm not sure if would be the done thing for an outsider to adopt. It can be confusing though, a bit like livng in Wales...

    2. Make  Money profile image72
      Make Moneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yeah you know, up to about a thousand years ago in Ireland and Scotland if the father was say Arthur MacDugal his son would be say Angus MacArthur and his son would be say John MacAngus.  They took their last name from their father's first name.  Mac and Mc means 'son of' while O' as in O'Brian means of the line of Brian.

      So I could be wrong when I say the names are Barsabas  Justus, Titus Justus and Jesus Justus.  That's how I read it.  Don't know for sure.  I found 19 occurrences for a search for 'surnamed' in the Bible.  Here's a couple of examples; Daniel surnamed Baltassar, John who was surnamed Gaddis and Simon, who was surnamed Thasi.  So I was thinking the three (Barsabas, Titus and Jesus) could be sons of Justus.  But not when I look at 1 Machabees 2:2-5.  Interesting.

      1. Paraglider profile image87
        Paragliderposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Yes. The Scottish Mac or Mc meant exactly that. But the system 'froze' at some point, establishing the fixed clans, and Mac changed from 'son of' to 'line of'. I don't know if we ever had a 'daughter of' prefix, equivalent of the Arabs 'bint'.

        1. Sufidreamer profile image81
          Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          A long time since I attempted to study Irish Gaelic, but I remember that an unmarried woman has the prefix 'Ni' instead of 'O', as in Ni Connail. A married woman has the prefix 'Ui.' There is another prefix for the Macs, but I can't remember that one.

          1. Mark Knowles profile image61
            Mark Knowlesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            It is rather interesting how the old naming conventions are so obviously sexist. None for "daughter of" in a lot of cultures and renaming to identify which woman already belongs to someone  - but not the men. wink

            1. Paraglider profile image87
              Paragliderposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              It's probably because Adam was here first...

            2. Sufidreamer profile image81
              Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              It is a strange one - in most Celtic cultures, lineage was traced through the mother. I have no idea when that changed - I would research it, but I am busy with the bloody challenge wink

          2. 0
            sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            maybe they incorporated daughters into the name themselves.  Like um.. in spanish senorita which is girl and senora which is something like mother.

            or maybe like a sufix, senior and seniora. Or Alex and Alexis, or Alexander and Alexandra.

          3. Make  Money profile image72
            Make Moneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            That is interesting.  I've always thought that I'd like to learn Gaelic.  If any of you have Celtic ancestry you might be able to find your line in the Milesian Genealogies from the Annals of the Four Masters.

            The Celts may have followed a maternal line back in the time when the Romans were in Great Britain.  Boudica, a female Celtic leader led an uprising of the tribes against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire around 60 AD.  This may not prove they followed a maternal line though because Boudica's husband, the Icenian King had died.

            If there truly is a connection between the Israelites and the Irish/Scottish then they may have been following a maternal line, because I have heard the Israelites also followed a maternal line.  Then again I have just heard that the Israelites followed a maternal line without much proof.  We know that Abraham's son was Issac and his son was Jacob.  And we know that Saul's son was David and his son was Solomon.  And all the geneologies in the Bible are from father to son.  Does anyone know about this apparent Israelite maternal line?         

            I think they established the fixed surnames for the clans just after the Normans arrived.

  5. Make  Money profile image72
    Make Moneyposted 7 years ago

    That's interesting Paraglider, how they got their surnames similarly in both the Middle East and the British Isles.  Especially when you consider the story of Milesius, apparently a descendant of Jacob who was suppose to have traveled with his family from the middle east first to Spain, then to Ireland around the time of Solomon.  The High Kings were descended from Milesius and there are a lot of people from Ireland and Scotland and some in England that can trace their line back to Milesius.  Yeah instead of just 'son of' when you consider 'daughter of' you'd think it would be 'child of'.

  6. Make  Money profile image72
    Make Moneyposted 7 years ago

    In both the Douay-Rheims Bible and the King James Bible it is spelled Barsabas in Acts 1:23.  Yeah someone else besides Barnabas.

 
working