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Would you tell your child that their pet died or would you replace it ?

  1. loveofnight profile image80
    loveofnightposted 4 years ago

    Would you tell your child that their pet died or would you replace it ?

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  2. Debraw50 profile image76
    Debraw50posted 4 years ago

    I would be honest and tell the child as easy as I could that their pet died. Then I would explain that the pet would be going to heaven to live with God and the Angels. When I was told this as a child, I felt very sad but knowing that my pet was going to live with God, made me feel better. I think it makes things a lot easier when you get older too, Honesty is always the best way,

    1. loveofnight profile image80
      loveofnightposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      You are probably right,  it's just that I hate to see the sadness in her eyes knowing that her little friend is no more.

  3. profile image0
    Emily Sparksposted 4 years ago

    Good question.  I know when I was little, one day my cat just didn't show up, and she didn't after that.  My parents told me "maybe she ran away".  I found out several years later that she had been hit on the road but they didn't want me to be upset.  They thought it would be easier for me to accept if she "ran away."
    I guess it would depend on how you think your child would be able to handle it.  If not well, maybe replacing would be the option.  You would have to know your child!

    1. loveofnight profile image80
      loveofnightposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      When I was a kid I remember my mom searching through pet shops just to find the right fish or bird to replace my baby brother or sister's pet when they were little. This whole honesty thing although it may be correct it still is hard to know.

  4. Theophanes profile image97
    Theophanesposted 4 years ago

    I was talking to a small child one day who told me an interesting story about her Betta fish. "It was blue but since it was a girl it turned red!" I was confused, to say the least. Later on when she was in bed the parents told me the original fish died and they were unable to find a matching fish.

    I think it depends on how old the child is, what kind of pet it is, and what you know your child can deal with. If it's a goldfish and your kid is 2, I don't think you'll get bad marks for replacing it or making a joke about joining Nemo. Larger pets and older children on the other hand.... probably best to tell them and have a long talk about it.

    1. loveofnight profile image80
      loveofnightposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Her pet was a parakeet named Raven which is making the truth sound like the better way to go although I was trying to convince myself to take the road of deception.

  5. moonfairy profile image82
    moonfairyposted 4 years ago

    I would be honest and tell the truth as gently as I could, because this won't be the only time that they have to deal with death......replacing it would be trying to trick them and it's funny what kids will remember. It may become a trust issue in the future.

  6. profile image0
    JustCraftyposted 4 years ago

    I always was truthful with my daughter when any of her animal died.  We even had to have mini funerals but it helped to prepare her for when she had to go to real funerals so I believe it all was for the best to start her knowing the truth about death.

    1. loveofnight profile image80
      loveofnightposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I never thought about it from this angle, thanks.

  7. wychic profile image90
    wychicposted 4 years ago

    I would tell them that the animal died. Death is a part of life that will only get more common, and how we as adults treat it will help shape how the children see it. It's sad, and it's okay to feel sad, but this is what happens. That said, when my oldest son was two, our pet bird died. I didn't use the word "dead" because I didn't think he'd understand it, but I did tell him that the bird was gone and couldn't come back. He was sad for a day or two, and occasionally asked where the bird was, but I just reconfirmed that it was gone. I let him see the empty cage, and had him help me put it in storage so he knew there was no animal left to go in there. When I was younger, I was told that a beloved pet had run away -- and spent weeks looking for it. Thankfully my mom learned too, and when my next cat got run over she let me help bury her and make a headstone for her.

 
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