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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (11 posts)

Not hip dysplasia, but signs of SOMETHING WRONG!!

  1. profile image46
    mhns002posted 7 years ago

    I have a 4 month old south african boerboel who when we recieved him showed signs of hind leg problems. We thought he had hip dysplasia. His x-rays were beautiful and perfect! Problem is that he has trouble getting up after a long day of fun or just a short spurt of energy in the yard. He guards his rear when it hurts. One day it was so bad he couldn't even get up from the floor. I've looked online everywhere, and I've had him at the vet with no answers. If anyone else has had or seen similar problems I would love to hear about it and if they've found anything wrong! I wanna make our baby better. I feel so helpless.

    1. profile image49
      litetenderposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      You might want to see another vet. It sounds like Pano (panosteitis) to me. It's especially common in larger, fast growing pups. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panosteitis

      Hopefully, this is helpful!

      Brett

      1. Sab Oh profile image55
        Sab Ohposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        That sounds about right, and can be controlled with pain meds.

    2. profile image42
      Tclaconaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      You may want to have your dog examined for the muscle disease that is similar to MS in humans, your dog is rather young to have this, however, rule this out, because if he/she does, many treatments can be started now, that could put this condition in remission, diet, supplements.
      Also Pano may be the problem, which is a mucle problem, in puppies, your vet can help your dog,and you to manage this condition that ,I think, he/ se will "grow out of".. Pain meds may be needed, a Vet will know...
      Also, consider limiting your dogs over exertion- especially jumping, it may be he is over doing exercise.
      One more suggestion, it is becoming more important, due to several factors-- to make sure that your dog gets a good supplement/ vitamins.
      Good luck,enjoy your dog!

      1. profile image45
        A Ladyposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        There is a disease similar to MS in humans DM (degenerative myelopathy). If that is the case, there is no cure, any more than there is with humans, but aquaexercise and acupuncture are helpful.)

    3. vigorousexpert profile image60
      vigorousexpertposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      See a homeopathic vet only. Pain meds do not address the root cause, which could possibly be vaccine induced neuropathy. It is important you see a holistic vet that can address the cause with natural remedies, as opposed to drugs that only cover up symptoms.

    4. profile image45
      A Ladyposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Be sure to give him fish oil. That helped for our shepherd mix, when he started limping or having trouble getting up. I started giving it to him at age 7, and he had 3 more wonderful years before a progressive myelitis (like Lou Gehrig's Disease) ended us life. I only wish I had given it to him from the day I got him. A MD relative of mine has said that the studies are showing that fish oil helps with everything from arthritis to allergies in humans, and so lets help our devoted friends!  (and dogs don't seem to mind "fish breath" like humans do, so you don't have to buy the more expensive enteric coated tablets.

  2. profile image51
    Kathy LaPointeposted 7 years ago

    If you do get the diagnosis of panosteitis and it doesn't get better in a reasonable amount of time, please see another vet.  Always good to get a second opinion.  My pup was diagnosed with that and until I pushed the issue, they weren't going to do xrays.  Turns out, he had elbow dysplasia.  You can see the little differences and progress much better than anyone else!!

  3. parkercoleman profile image60
    parkercolemanposted 7 years ago

    I have no idea what it is because I am not a vet and haven't seen your dog. I will say, though, that the first thing I thought of is that swimming might be helpful. Then, I saw that someone else, who sounds pretty knowledgeable, suggested aqua-exercise. The second thought that occurred to me is to see if he has any intestinal infestations, including the bacterial ones. It could be a gastro-intestinal or rectal issue seemingly unrelated to his hip pain.

    I agree too, with the other comments to see a different vet! Feeding a dog pain meds will only mask  any underlying issue. That is, of course, if it is affordable.

    Good luck with your baby. I hope he is feeling better.

  4. patdmania profile image57
    patdmaniaposted 7 years ago

    Good luck with your dog.  It looks like you have had a lot of good answers.  I am sorry to hear about this.

  5. Diane Inside profile image77
    Diane Insideposted 7 years ago

    First thing I thought of is arthritis larger get this most often, because of carrying more weight on their joints but looks like xrays would have caught that.

    anway good luck hope you are able to find out proper diagnoses.

 
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