What are the pros and con’s of printing your original art work

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  1. Castlepaloma profile image77
    Castlepalomaposted 7 years ago

    Ever since Andy Warhol (he called himself a con artist) has turn much of our art world into print art world. Many great artists have also turn to printing their own ART works.

    Do you think there is more con’s in prints and it harms the artist integrity, or do you think there more pro’s to selling your fine art work in print on the web?

    1. DonnaCSmith profile image92
      DonnaCSmithposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      The pro is it makes the art available to more people, who otherwise could not afford it. And generates more income for the artist.

      Online selling/promoting is the way of the future in arts of all kinds - writers, visual artists, and musicians. I don't think there is any turning back.

      Con - that the art isn't just for the elite. But is that a con or a pro? And there is always the original piece to make those folks happy;o)

      1. Castlepaloma profile image77
        Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        That is another way of looking at it; you are spreading more happiness rather than acting like a pre-Madonna. My daughter (artist) is more pre Madonna than I am yet I think her mind is changing.

        What about rip off companies talking your stuff and selling it better than you without your consent?

        1. DonnaCSmith profile image92
          DonnaCSmithposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          That would be a con for sure. I always use a very low resolution when I put my photographs online so they are not usable as prints. You can sign them, too, which helps.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image77
            Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            DonnaCSmith

            If they are in very low resolution , would that not harm in your over all sales?

            1. DonnaCSmith profile image92
              DonnaCSmithposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              What do you mean? I have the originals when someone wants a print.

              1. Castlepaloma profile image77
                Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                I assume you sell your work as art photograph; my work has lot of details to follow and need full impact.

                If I were to show my art work with poor lighting to take one example, I would have fewer sales. By over protecting myself with low resolution, it could harm my sales?

                1. DonnaCSmith profile image92
                  DonnaCSmithposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                  NO, low resolution is not low light. it has to do with the no. of pixals. I assume you'd scan your art work and when you can it you scan it at full res. then make a copy in your computer at low res. for putting it online. It someone tried printing it out large enough to use it would be fuzzy or "pixilated."

                  Many artists I know show their art on their websites or on Facebook this way.

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image77
                    Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                    I guess your photo dose not use that much online, yet it dose when someone tries to blow it up to print, make sense

                    Thanks

  2. profile image0
    Charlinexposted 7 years ago

    If I sell my work, I always go to a high quality commercial printer so my buyers can get the best and long-lasting professional quality of my images. If you have the professional quality printing equipment and you are skilled in printing, it's nothing wrong to print your own.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image77
      Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      From checking out your hubs, you know your Photography,
      I know my art work is great but just starting out in prints. A commercial printer sound too expensive to just test a new learning curve business out.

      What does a good commercial printer cost anyways?

      1. DonnaCSmith profile image92
        DonnaCSmithposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I have my prints made at Mpix.com. But now I am experimenting with some mixed medium, using my photos, scanner and printer, some collage. So, I am doing that all on my home equipment.

        What kind of prints do you want to do? Do some Google searches and you can get an idea of prices.

      2. recommend1 profile image70
        recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Two things spring to mind reading your thread here.

        First - putting up low resolution images stops copying - showing some detail in high resolution in company with the whole pic might overcome the "will they buy if they can't see the quality" issue.

        Second - there are poster print places in most big shopping malls now - can't you make some kind of deal with them where you sell your work to someone and give them a code - and then print your pic through the poster printers computer without leaving the image file on their computer ?? - ie some kind of online printdirect feed ?

        Just thinking smile

  3. brimancandy profile image78
    brimancandyposted 7 years ago

    There is an easy way to stop someone from scamming your art work. Make copies of your artwork, or the original, and sign and date them, and then mail them to yourself, or have them date stamped. But don't open it!
    You can also keep a dated photo-log of your work, and keep it in a safe place.

    That way if someone tries to steal your work, you have evidence that it is yours, in case you decide to sue the thief. That is something I learned at an actor/director seminar. Always date your work.

    1. DonnaCSmith profile image92
      DonnaCSmithposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I've heard that in reference to writing, but had not though of it for art. Although, it seems if you have the original that's proof enough. And for my photos they are on my memory cards and in my computer.

      As for putting work online you can sign it, and use a low resolution so if they try to print them they will be pixelated.

    2. Castlepaloma profile image77
      Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Some good ideas guys. I would avoid lawyers, you rarely you win.

 
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