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Do you think it is right that some companies use psychometric testing in the int

  1. Lisa Wilton profile image84
    Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years ago

    Do you think it is right that some companies use psychometric testing in the interview process?

  2. Arghness profile image92
    Arghnessposted 5 years ago

    I think it's a decent idea in theory, but as my belief is that "everyone lies", the psychometric testing really only weeds out the imbeciles who are foolish enough to be truthful on such assessments.  We're all sociopaths, or loners, or have mental disorders or personality defects, we're human!  These tests are to determine, at least in my experience, if we are not human by testing us based upon traits that are what companies deem as the most humanistic.  So, what do people do?  They lie on these tests and get the jobs.

    The tests, as they are now, are wrong, and poorly implemented, at that.  If, perchance, these tests were to gauge intelligence, capability, aptitude and the like, then I'd say go for it.  But for now it's just a screening for personality defects as a rationale to deny employment.  Wrongo.

  3. LKMore01 profile image74
    LKMore01posted 5 years ago

    Excellent question, Lisa. The test results have to show validity and reliability to be successful. Personally, psychometric testing eliminates candidates who may not test well but could still be outstanding employees. Outside of a job interview psychometric tests are fascinating and I love taking them simply because they might teach you more about your strengths and weaknesses.

    1. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I love taking them too because the whole thing fascinates me. Have you done the Myers Briggs test yet?

    2. LKMore01 profile image74
      LKMore01posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. I've taken it several  times, Lisa.  INFP. What did you discover?

    3. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm with you two--psychometric tests are fun and sometimes illuminating. (I'm an ENTJ--usually :-) ).

    4. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm an ENFP, big_smile I've done different tests but I always come out as the same.

  4. profile image0
    lesliebyarsposted 5 years ago

    I think it's an okay idea. It may help you more than it helps the employers. Great question.

  5. jpcmc profile image89
    jpcmcposted 5 years ago

    This is a very important question Lisa.  First, psychometric tests is just one part of the selection process.  It gives the company another criterion whether to hire or not.  Second, the test must be valid and reliable.  Unfortunately, I know many companies that simply download a few questions over the net and use them as psychometric tests.  Moreover, some companies use inappropriate tests especially if there are cultural differences.  Third, proper implementation of the test is required.  The quality of how it is administered will affect the results.  Moreover, the appropriate test must be utilized for what ever the company wants to measure.  Lastly, results must be interpreted by qualified people.  The MMPI for example requires trained individuals to interpret the results.  Although many tests come with a software that automates this process, there are still pen and paper tests that require manual checking and interpretation.  Likewise, background in psychology, testing and the like will help create a better understanding of the person's strengths and areas of improvements.  More importantly, it will give a better idea if the person is suited for the specific job.

    I believe that there is more to a person than just test results.  But psychometric tests can help guide in the selection and hiring process.

    1. connorj profile image76
      connorjposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I was about to answer this question and then I perused your answer. Excellent work, you have indeed "nailed" it...

    2. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You've highlighted a lot of different aspects of the process here. It seems there are so many areas where it could go wrong.

    3. jpcmc profile image89
      jpcmcposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks connorj.  I'm pretty sure you can add more to the discussion and answers.

  6. RNMSN profile image90
    RNMSNposted 5 years ago

    so the dude that wrote 'Dune' had it right all along? it will just show who is human?thats funny

  7. Savio Dawson profile image85
    Savio Dawsonposted 5 years ago

    Like evolution under all subjects, Psychometric was a standard which evolved to select the best candidate. At one time many would swear by a psychometric test as the best possible way to eliminate the so called "weak links" but now there is more and more realization that it is not a fool proof methodology.

    One of the things picking up these days is the Brain Sketch, which is a study of our finger tips to reveal our personality, strengths and weaknesses. Since you are a resident of United Kingdom, I understand that the MI6 and the FBI of the U.S. use it a lot. Now, of course, available in the public domain.

    1. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'll look up the Brain Sketch. It sounds really interesting! I think you're right though - psychometric testing is certainly not foolproof.

    2. Savio Dawson profile image85
      Savio Dawsonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Also not fool proof... :-)

  8. Just_Rodney profile image81
    Just_Rodneyposted 5 years ago

    We need to look at the validity of the test as per the specific needs of the position applied for.
    To willy nilly test "the janitor" and hire or not based on the result, this same test would and may appropiate for "the rocket scientest"
    As everything, these tests are good and bad, however when they are used becouse of a Company's Hiring Policy, then it becomes a bit of an invasion!
    Purely my opinion, of course!

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I share your opinion, Rodney! Taking things in context is highly important.

  9. profile image0
    khmohsinposted 5 years ago

    In my opinion, it is a basic part of the interview because the word psychometric basically refers to the measurement of the mind. Unlike facets such as education, skills, experience, appearance and punctuality, the behavioural traits and personality of a candidate can be much more difficult to assess during an interview.
    Some employers choose to use psychometric testing during their recruitment process to help give a better overall evaluation of a candidate and hopefully secure the best fit for the role.

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think, personally, that you won't know how someone will do in a job until months after you've hired them, so the less time spent interviewing and testing the better. The candidate may accept another job if you take too long deciding/testing.

    2. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with Laura here. I think that people are capable of adapting their personalities to fit the job. Tests tend to show me to hate rules and routines but I was a teacher for 13 years! I adapted because the job needed it...

    3. profile image0
      khmohsinposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I am agree with both of you but I just mention the official point of view. I also don't like these kind of testings bcuz they always bother me.

  10. tal g mel profile image61
    tal g melposted 5 years ago

    I don't think it is 100% tool for checking sombody ,sometimes people  getting excited and the results are not so good...

  11. Laura Schneider profile image91
    Laura Schneiderposted 5 years ago

    I think that, in most cases, it is unnecessary and a waste of time and money and may provide false results compared with simply hiring the person and seeing how well they do in the actual job. For highly important positions, however, such as those in which others' lives or safety are in the hands of the person if they were to be hired, it may be appropriate. For the most part, I feel a person's work history and a brief interview or two provides as much information as you're going to get until you have hired and worked with the person for a few months to a year. The interview process, in my opinion, should be simple, short, and sweet: it's always a guess whether someone will work out or not in reality.

    1. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer! I totally forgot about positions requiring great responsibility for the lives of others. I also agree with you about interviews. Meeting people face to face can reveal so much more I think.

    2. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Lisa, thanks for voting my answer "Best Answer"! I'm surprised, but  quite pleased: there were many good answers to this question.

    3. Lisa Wilton profile image84
      Lisa Wiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It was really hard to pick a best answer but you made a great point when you mentioned jobs that affect lives. Also, there is a lot of research online stating that psychometric tests are invalid so you make a good point about interviews.

 
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