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Advice; Is a clever title always best, or a more google-able title?

  1. Justin Earick profile image81
    Justin Earickposted 4 years ago

    http://s3.hubimg.com/u/7063834_f248.jpg
    Does it boil down to whether I am more concerned with fishing for more clicks, or making a quality product for my own pride? 
    Is a google-friendly title selling out for mere pennies, or just a means to an end?
    I guess once I start writing it down... I talk to myself, I know.
    I need more opinions.

    http://justinearick.hubpages.com/hub/Je … r-Liberals

    Do I want more Christians to read it and see how liberal Jesus was... or do I want more liberals to read it and have more bible verses to reference?   WWJD?

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I don't see an SEO title as selling out.  If google won't rate you no one will ever see it anyway - you have to tell google what the hub is about if you want it read.  Google doesn't learn much from catchy, attractive titles.

      Use your title to let big G know what you're writing about, then, and use the summary (hopefully shown by google) to attract and hook the readers you want.

      1. Justin Earick profile image81
        Justin Earickposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        You are right.  I guess I was weighing hubpages-generated traffic too heavily, when google searches are more effective so long as my title fits a search query.  Thanks.

        1. Marisa Wright profile image93
          Marisa Wrightposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          A lot of newbies make that mistake.  The active HubPages community is actually very small, and you'll run out of readers extremely quickly if you target them as your main audience!    Write your title for Google and your summary to catch your reader's attention.

  2. Simone Smith profile image88
    Simone Smithposted 4 years ago

    Hahaa, that's a lot of questions!

    Re: titles- we find that if you don't have a descriptive, search-friendly title, you're not likely to even show up in search engine listings.

    Does it help if the title is witty, too? Absolutely! It could help a searcher choose your Hub over the article of another. But that searcher won't even see the title if it is not, first and foremost, search-friendly.

  3. LindaSmith1 profile image60
    LindaSmith1posted 4 years ago

    Also use keyword in title but the title has to make sense too.

  4. profile image0
    Miriam Weissmannposted 4 years ago

    My titles are obviously designed with Google in mind, but if I can make something clever using keywords, then it's an added bonus. Concentrate on your meta description/summary to entice potential readers.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image93
      Marisa Wrightposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      What meta tags?  They do not exist on HubPages.

      1. weekend profile image61
        weekendposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Miriam is talking about what you call the 'summary'.

        1. profile image0
          Miriam Weissmannposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Right. The meta description is the summary you see in search results. I should have explained better.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meta_tag#T … _attribute

          1. Marisa Wright profile image93
            Marisa Wrightposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Ah, you edited your post to change "meta tags" to "meta description" after I posted my question.

            1. weekend profile image61
              weekendposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              From what I saw, she only added the word 'summary'. Not that I think it really matters to be honest.

              1. profile image0
                Miriam Weissmannposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                It doesn't matter, so please leave it alone.

              2. Marisa Wright profile image93
                Marisa Wrightposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                No, in her original post she referred to "meta tags", not "meta description".   I know what a meta description is, so if Miriam had used that word when she first wrote her post, I would not have felt any need to make a comment.

                There is no way you can tell what Miriam changed when she edited her post, because when you change the original quote, it changes all instances, even ones which have been imported into another post.

                I'm not sure why you think it's worth commenting on, though.  I was not having a go at Miriam, only explaining why I had made a comment which didn't seem relevant.

  5. Astra Nomik profile image73
    Astra Nomikposted 4 years ago

    I asked some writers from Hub Pages who write poetry whether they ever used the word poem or poet or even poetry in a summary or description of their poetry hubs. Many did not do so, saying that those "words" were not part of their poems.

    On the web, things are presented differently from in print. Magazines would look funny with cloud tags on the pages. And many writers don't bother with descriptions or keywords.

    In an analog world, some things still work only a certain way, and that's the way it may always be. Who knows.

  6. A Driveby Quipper profile image61
    A Driveby Quipperposted 4 years ago

    Take my advice. I never use it.

 
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