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"Spammy" elements in hubs

  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
    DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years ago

    With all the new changes being touted, and the fact (according to the most recent blog), indicating we will NOT have the choice to opt out of "hub pro basic," I am looking to clarify what spammy means,  and whether there are any exceptions.  For example, to quote directly from HP's own guidelines:

    "Products

    In general, product-oriented Hubs are considered spammy unless:

    Product(s) are directly relevant and not excessive

    If the Hub is about the product(s), then the Hub provides significant, useful information or opinion about the products beyond what could be found on Amazon's (or other seller's or manufacturer's) web site

    If the Hub recommends a particular product, then the recommendation seems genuine, trustworthy, and unbiased

    If the products were removed from the Hub, the remaining content would likely satisfy the reader"


    I have a hub on camping for the first time, and in it, next to the appropriate text in each case, I feature several items of camping gear in Amazon capsules.  These are there, intended to show the reader what the item is and how they can purchase, if interested.

    It is not a product-review hub; it is a how-to hub, offering the items that are needed or would be useful for the activity.

    I do hope this is not now going to be considered a spammy hub!

    1. Paul Edmondson profile image
      91
      Paul Edmondsonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      If you have a substantial hub on camping for the first time and recommend products to use such as an essential tent that you describe why it's great for the first time camper it will likely be fine.

      However, if you illustrate a hub with products as examples and list several products that will likely be excessive.

      With products, only add essential products to your articles.  We often see folks over do it because it's an easy way to add content to a hub, but in reality, it tends to clutter up a hub and bring no sales. 

      If you are ever looking for a great product review example, look at thewirecutter.  That is over the top example of content that supports a product capsule.

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
        DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Right--but this is not a product review hub.  I've done a couple of those, and they only needed a single Amazon capsule to show the product under review.
        The camping article offers readers a chance to buy a tent, a sleeping bag, camp stove, etc. placed with the relevant text.

        This is the hub, if you want to see for yourself:

        http://  dzymslizzy.hubpages.com/hub/  Camping-For-the-First-Time-How-To-Succeed-and-Enjoy

        (spaces added to disable the direct link, which would have been snipped, in this particular forum)

        1. Paul Edmondson profile image
          91
          Paul Edmondsonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I can see you have put a lot of effort into this hub. On Hubs that are very general, I'd get a picture before adding a product unless you are providing specifics on why that tent, sleeping bag etc is the right product for the job.

          Here is an example of where you should add a product.  For summer beginner car campers in most parts of California I recommend a summer bag that is rated between 35 - 50 degrees.  I've tested three bags for comfort, inside material, zipper, weight, and easy of rolling.  (Go into details on each bag).  Based on my personal use, I recommend the Joe Summer Bag.  <add product>

          Here is an example of when you shouldn't.  For summer beginner car campers you'll need a sleeping bag to stay warm through the night.  If it's your first time camping you'll want a good, but not too expensive sleeping bag.  <Product>

          My tip is only add a product when there is real details to support the recommendation.  Not just because someone may want to purchase one because it's in a list of things someone may need.

          1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
            DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Okay, thanks, Paul.

            I see I have a lot of work to do on revising this hub, then.  I already have my own camping gear, and none of it is new, and much is not available anymore.
            That is why I placed products to choose from as illustrations, because I don't have the budget to go buy new items myself, and do comparison testing for first-hand recommendations.
            So, I guess I will eliminate all the Amazon capsules, and try to find Pixabay phots instead.  Thanks for the insight and specific examples.

            1. Marisa Wright profile image95
              Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              If you do that, you'll make very little money on the Hub. 

              I would suggest keeping the capsules, but do your research - what are the best quality, low cost products that a beginner could use?  Then feature those products and say why.  Although first-hand experience is always best, if you can draw together good information from around the internet, that can also be valuable. 

              Having said that, I just Googled to find the best camping products for beginners, and there's already a large number of articles on that topic.

              1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
                DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                Yes, Marisa, but this is not a 'best camping products for beginners" hub; it is a" how-to and where to go, and what to expect when out camping" hub.
                That is where, according to Paul, my problem would come in with product capsules.

                I edited the hub, dropped the Amazon capsules down to two products, with which I do have specific, personal experience, and used Pixabay images for the rest.

                Now, I wait and see. wink

    2. bravewarrior profile image95
      bravewarriorposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      If the products relate to the hub and you specifically mention them (in general, not by brand), such as sleeping bag, tent, portable stove, etc. you should be fine. Just don't include too many product capsules.

      1. Marisa Wright profile image95
        Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Bravewarrior, your advice is a little out of date since HubPages tightened up on the rules around Amazon capsules.

        These days, if you refer to a generic product in your text and then choose a random example of that product in a capsule, you're likely to get penalised for "spammy content".     Now, HubPages expects you to find a good example of each product AND explain why you'd recommend that particular one.

        1. bravewarrior profile image95
          bravewarriorposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Marisa, I see so many hubs that have related products featured but are not specifically mentioned in the text. How could writing about camping and choosing product capsules that directly relate to camping be considered spammy?

          1. Marisa Wright profile image95
            Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            If you read what MsLizzy said about her Hub, that's exactly what her original version of the Hub was - and it was assessed as having "spammy elements".

            You will still see plenty of Hubs which are like that, because if they haven't been edited recently, they haven't gone through QAP since the standards changed.

            1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
              DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              Correction:  it was not officially assessed as having 'spammy elements.' 

              I asked the question as a preventative measure, given some of the newer guidelines, so as to keep that from happening.

  2. paradigm search profile image60
    paradigm searchposted 2 years ago

    You just want to play, as do I.

    Update: tracking back.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
      DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      paradigm ...??????????????????

  3. Faceless39 profile image91
    Faceless39posted 2 years ago

    I had a hub similar to that, except the topic was how to make your own terrarium. HubPages decided to unfeature it without telling me why, and also without alerting me to the new "laws." I emailed them and had to pretty much remove all my *helpful* product ads to get my hub re-featured. This is just another example of why I went off and created my own website. HubPages is great for many things, but not for selling products anymore, it seems. Hope that helps.

 
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