Regarding Google vs. traffic, content and comments

Jump to Last Post 1-6 of 6 discussions (21 posts)
  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
    DzyMsLizzyposted 18 months ago

    Recently, I've learned that "The Big G" considers comments as content, this being the reason HP is going in to edit comments for proper spelling & grammar. 

    Also, along these lines, I've seen it said in these forum posts, that because it's content, comments that are very short don't help, and may hurt. 

    So--is that saying that people who just stop by and leave 2 to 5 word comments are not helping the article?  I'm torn as to whether to approve or deny such comments as "Nice piece" or "Very informative article."  I don't like to hurt people's feelings, (by not approving their comments), but neither do I wish to hurt my traffic chances from G.

    1. jackclee lm profile image81
      jackclee lmposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      My opinion is all comments are good except for spam. The fact that someone read an article and is moved to comment or react, positive or negative is a good thing. I read recently, many news sites have decided to scrap the comment section because they were too toxic and full of trolls...
      It is up the author to add a comment module or not.

  2. Marisa Wright profile image97
    Marisa Wrightposted 18 months ago

    The fact is, if you don't delete those comments, HubPages will - that would count as a "low quality" comment and they periodically cull those.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
      DzyMsLizzyposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Ah, ok, thanks, Marisa.  Good to know.

      1. Matt Wells profile imageSTAFF
        Matt Wellsposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Comments like "Nice piece" or "Very informative article" will not be removed by Moderators. We are mainly focused on removing spam and comments that are difficult to read and understand.

        1. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
          DzyMsLizzyposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Thank you, Matt, for clarifying that!

        2. Marisa Wright profile image97
          Marisa Wrightposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          That's interesting, because when the feature was first introduced, the discussion suggested very short comments would be caught in the filter.

          1. lobobrandon profile image88
            lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

            I personally do not remember it saying anything about very short comments. Just spammy comments. This is done through people working at mturk and it's not a script that's controlling this stuff, is it?

            1. Matt Wells profile imageSTAFF
              Matt Wellsposted 18 months agoin reply to this

              This is what the HubPages Newsletter said regarding the types of comments that are typically denied.

              "Comments that are admin denied will be deleted (only spam or extremely low quality comments are typically denied this way)."

              Comments that have not received a decision by the author within 7 days will be reviewed by a Moderator.

    2. Venkatachari M profile image30
      Venkatachari Mposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      But, what about previous (old) hubs? Should we go through all of them and remove those short low quality comments?

  3. firstcookbooklady profile image87
    firstcookbookladyposted 18 months ago

    I don't know, but that comment seems spammy to me.

  4. lobobrandon profile image88
    lobobrandonposted 18 months ago

    It's usually your followers who leave such comments. What I personally do is approve them (if they are not culled, as Marisa has pointed out). I even go ahead and reply to them. I wait 2 - 3 days, give the commenter time to read my reply and then delete both, the comment and my reply.

    As I edit old hubs I also go through the comments and delete any old comments that fall in this category and my replies too.

  5. Jesse Drzal profile image97
    Jesse Drzalposted 18 months ago

    Do you guys think Google likes to see the author replying to comments on articles interacting with readers? Just a thought. Probably does not matter.

    1. lobobrandon profile image88
      lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Does not matter. There is no schema markup being used to say you are the author and are replying to comments. Not yet at least.

  6. Jesse Drzal profile image97
    Jesse Drzalposted 18 months ago

    That's pretty much what I thought.

    1. DrMark1961 profile image98
      DrMark1961posted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Jesse, I disagree. If someone asks you a question about the best sites in Cape Cod, and you provide more details than is available in your hub, your hub might show up if a specific question is asked related to your answer.
      Have you ever done a search for something and found that the answer is in the comment section, and not in the body of the article? I have. Can I give you an idea on how important it is or how often this happens? No, not at all.

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        That's not what he asked.

        1. DrMark1961 profile image98
          DrMark1961posted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Which is why I explained that answers need to contain information. If someone asks a question and your reply "yes" or "no" I doubt Google cares.
          You stated that there is no scheme being used to allow Google to know you are replying. Do you know this for sure? Are you privy to the information that Google uses to rank its pages?

          1. lobobrandon profile image88
            lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

            Yes I do know this for sure. I work on OnSite SEO myself and I do follow the Google guys and various webinars.

            Content in the comments helps for sure. It's content. Period. It also helps update a page and adds freshness. No more to it.

      2. Marisa Wright profile image97
        Marisa Wrightposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        I think what Jesse was getting at was, maybe the mere fact of interaction is important - and in that case, keeping meaningless comments and replying to them might count for something.  Lobobrandon was saying no, it doesn't. 

        If you've got meaningful questions and useful answers in your comments then of course that has value because it's good content.  The fact of who is asking and who is answering - Google can't tell.

        1. lobobrandon profile image88
          lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Yup that's what I meant. Thanks Marisa. Was on my phone and walking while I typed. I couldn't explain it clearly.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)