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While browsing weird and wonderful words...

  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
    DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago

    I came across a new piece of information:

    A tigon is the offspring of a male tiger and a lioness.  In parentheses, it gave the alternate combination, of which I was already aware: a liger is the offspring of a male lion and a tigress.

    Now, I wonder, what would you call the offspring of a tigon and a liger???  lol lol lol

    1. kenneth avery profile image80
      kenneth averyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      @DzyMsLizzy: tiggor?

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
        DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

        LOL!  ligon ??  lol

    2. Venkatachari M profile image84
      Venkatachari Mposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      No, @Dzy, it will again become tiger. You will start with a part of the male name half and the other half female name part. So, take "ti' and "Ger".
      Better, you don't allow them. Lol !!!
      But, you missed another point. How to distinguish a male offspring from a female offspring, if you go by this perspective? Do you name both of them "liger"?

  2. Jodah profile image86
    Jodahposted 6 months ago

    DzyMsLizzy,
    I have heard of both a tigon and liger, but maybe they are sterile or neutral gender like a mule which is the offspring of a horse and a donkey but can't have offspring itself.

    1. Venkatachari M profile image84
      Venkatachari Mposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      A good point to consider.

    2. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
      DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      That's true, Jodah; I wondered that myself.  But, smart-ass that I am, I had to throw in a monkey wrench.  lol

  3. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago

    Columbus (Ohio) Zoo & Aquarium scientists tell me that possible mating combinations that can produce offspring are:

    tiger + tigon = ti-tigon
    lion + tigon = li-tigon
    lion + liger = li-liger
    tiger + liger = ti-liger

    They think that no tigon and liger have mated and produced offspring yet, but photo-shopped possibilities have passed for real on social media. So, I guess no one yet knows what to call them if they are produced in the future -- with genetic manipulation (?). Maybe we'd even get a lion and/or a tiger.

    Interesting question.

    1. lobobrandon profile image82
      lobobrandonposted 6 months ago in reply to this

      Hehe nice info. But I do not think it would end up being a lion or tiger again. Near 0% probability, even if they can reproduce.

      1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
        Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago in reply to this

        According to my years of genetics training, if both tigon and liger are fertile, then chances for offspring are 25% probability Tiger, 25% Lion, 25% tigon, and 25% liger. Simplified, results of the offspring could be, given that T = Tiger DNA and L = Lion DNA:

        Parents:  tigon = T + L     and liger = L & T
        Offspring could be: TL (tigon) or TT (tiger) or LL (lion) or LT (liger)

        We can also create an embryo by using females of each hybrid, injecting the inner genetic material of the egg cell of one hydrid into the egg cell of the other, opposite hybrid. The result will be the same as the above.

        Thus, the possible offspring of a tigon and a liger, are: Tiger, Lion, tigon, liger.

        1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
          DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

          WOW, Patty!!  I'm impressed!!!  That's most interesting indeed.  wink

          1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
            Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago in reply to this

            Well, let's see if the project to bring back the woolly mammoth works - that might be impressive. It may not be wise, because I think the world is running out of resources too fast to feed them. Maybe it will be impressive bad judgment to bring them back. I think the plan is to use elephant DNA combined with mammoth DNA and I hope it does not result in the disasters of "Jurassic Park" or people trying to breed and sell tiny woolly elephants.

            LOL; your big-cat question was fun to think about!

            1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
              DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

              smile  Yes, I love oddball trivia bits like that. 

              As to the woolly mammoth, I have but one question:  "why?"  Did they not realize there was a bit of a lesson in the Jurassic Park movie???

              Just because we are able to do something, does not mean we should!  wink

              1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
                Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago in reply to this

                I agree. Some researchers can get carried away, I think. How ever will we feed these big animals?

                1. lobobrandon profile image82
                  lobobrandonposted 6 months ago in reply to this

                  They are not that much bigger than elephants are they?  African Elephants for example

                  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
                    DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

                    Oh, yes--they were a great deal bigger!  Check out a natural history museum..  yikes

        2. lobobrandon profile image82
          lobobrandonposted 6 months ago in reply to this

          Ooh interesting. Can I pick your brain a bit?  I did study biology for 2 years minor subjects. What you described is similar to what I know regarding blood groups.

          Blood groups is genetics. But from what I understood you're saying that we could have pure breed lions and tigers as offspring?

          1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
            Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago in reply to this

            They may not be 100% pure-breed, but look like it, and I think we'd have to produce the offspring and do genetic testing on them to see for sure. Tigers are bigger than lions on average, so we may get what looks like a total lion, but bigger; or a "100%" tiger that is smaller than average. There may be other factors as well - like all the shades of skin color when Africans and Caucasians produce offspring together. Could there be "shades" of tiger-ness, for example? Possible.

            This is all interesting.

            1. lobobrandon profile image82
              lobobrandonposted 6 months ago in reply to this

              Yes this is what I meant. Some traits may change. It's super interesting.

            2. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
              DzyMsLizzyposted 6 months ago in reply to this

              I wonder, then, why lions look bigger???

              1. lobobrandon profile image82
                lobobrandonposted 6 months ago in reply to this

                I assume it's because of the mane. The male lions I mean.

                Yes I did see a mammoth at the natural history museum at Vienna. Also I remember seeing a documentary on National geographic where they compare African elephants to mammoths. The fur adds to their size. But from what I remember they are maybe 10% bigger (if I have to throw a number around)  But I'm gonna Google it now hehe. Let's see. This is one of the most interesting threads on here in a while smile

                1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
                  Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago in reply to this

                  Ohio's several American mammoths in our museum are over 12 feet tall at the shoulder. They probably became smaller with food resources running out.

              2. Patty Inglish, MS profile image88
                Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 months ago in reply to this

                The lion's shoulders and chests are built differently.

 
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