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jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (14 posts)

What will you do when you discover that your kid has blocked you on face book?

  1. kafsoa profile image72
    kafsoaposted 7 years ago

    What will you do when you discover that your kid has blocked you on face book?

  2. Johanna Baker profile image74
    Johanna Bakerposted 7 years ago

    Your child may want their own space and it is part of the separation that comes with your child growing up and individuating. If you cannot talk with them and have a loving relationship with them in private  then you will have some concerns and you will need to re-establish and build your relationship with them.

  3. Ancillotti profile image61
    Ancillottiposted 7 years ago

    First, do not despair!
    Sometimes the children need their own space and do not want to share with parents who share the same with your friends. Just remember that often parents do not talk with their children issues that relate to their colleagues or others in his social cycle because they feel uncomfortable.
    That does not mean your child does not love you or who is ashamed of you. A frank and without pressure talk may be solution your problem.

  4. yazoogal43 profile image34
    yazoogal43posted 7 years ago

    Block the kid in return and limit computer use the child may fear reaction from you concerning friends

  5. suncat profile image57
    suncatposted 7 years ago

    Beg for forgiveness, ask what you did wrong, never repeat the same mistake.

    If you don't accomplish anything by begging try to ask what would be the thing he/she really wants then try to get/buy it.

    This two methods are for fun only, if they work - it's great, but sometimes children are stubborn so it may require more communication between you and a child to bring back the trust.

  6. BKAONE profile image77
    BKAONEposted 7 years ago

    I actually blocked my mom and I'm 41...lol.

  7. james_foreclosure profile image49
    james_foreclosureposted 7 years ago

    oooo... interesting modern-day issue. first, ask them why. maybe they don't want you to see their friends or their pictures. in general, i don't think there's much to worry about if you trust your child, but if you suspect they are posting inappropriate pictures or comments then you should step in. after all, they are living under your roof.

  8. onegoodwoman profile image74
    onegoodwomanposted 7 years ago

    I can not comfort a hurting heart.........

    but I can share this story.

    As the mother of 3 daughters,

    One asked me to sign up for FB to view her family photos.
    When daughter 2 was notified of a "friend", she thought she was sending a note to her sister.........daughter 3.

    The note, as I mistakenly received it, read.....

    "Block and mark everything private, Mom is searching us."

    Today, I do not want my daughters viewing MY page!

    Some small, minor, details are not meant to be shared with every family member.........No big deal.

  9. Rgerard profile image57
    Rgerardposted 7 years ago

    As a kid, I know that my parents are not my friends. There is a fine line between parents and friends and I think good parents know the difference. With that being said, I have a great relationship with my parents but they dont need to know everything that I do at 20 years old and I know this for a fact. Besides, our relationship is strong enough where if I have something I need to say, my parents are the first people I tell. So if your kids dont want to be friends with you on Facebook it doesnt mean they hate you. It just means that they dont want you posting 'I love you' all over their wall.

  10. Katharella profile image79
    Katharellaposted 7 years ago

    Sorry if you were hurt kafsoa! I actually just deleted my son off of my facebook, because he's my son, not my friend. We can't be friends with our children. Some can, or can "think" they are, but even though I have friends who are actually younger than him, we have a different connection as in friendships or just relationship in general!
    Kids spend their lives being monitored by us parents! There comes a time when you just can't hold their hand in public anymore! I have some friends my age, that love their parents dearly but still... want their privacy.. away from "mom" it doesn't mean your child loves you any less, they just get to that age they want to become their own person! smile It's better than sneaking away, so try to value what you do have! smile

  11. nightwork4 profile image60
    nightwork4posted 7 years ago

    they wouldn't be using the computer that's for sure. my kids know better then to think that they could do that but if they did we would take away their computer priviledges and then i would talk to them and explain why they aren't suppose to do this. i don't bother my kids on facebook because i'm their dad not their friend but i will not allow them to block me because part of being a parent is being able to know what you kid is up to.

  12. ravenlt04 profile image62
    ravenlt04posted 7 years ago

    Well, he/she may have something to hide....  You may want to inquire about his/her page; ask to see it.  I wouldn't be too invasive or accusative.  Teenagers are sensitive, and you do not want to cut off the lines of communication totally or violate his/her trust.

  13. tritrain profile image84
    tritrainposted 7 years ago

    Is this for a monitoring reason, or are you sort of offended that your kid blocked you?

    If it is because you want to see what is being discussed, then I think you could implement one of those monitoring services.

    If it is because your kid simply wants privacy and doesn't want Mom watching, then I would not take offense to it.

    I guess you have to ask yourself why it bothers you.

  14. editor profile image58
    editorposted 7 years ago

    Go in hard.

    Cut off all money and candy supplies first. That will soften them up a little. Then remove a cable from their games console, keeps them guessing. Do a room search twice a week, instead of just once. If they can write, read their diaries, if they can't, make them learn. After that you're talking about cutting off their internet and TV.

    During this time make sure to keep your fingers out of doorways, as doors will be slammed. Get ear plugs for the screaming, and headache tablets for the dull moaning (nothing blocks out this sound). Take all junk food out of the house (or at least lock it in your own bedroom). At night lock yourself in your bedroom just encase (have some junk food).

    Give it a week and they'll be begging you to be their facebook friend again.

 
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