What measures are being taken by this platform against A.I?

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  1. Pollyanna Jones profile image93
    Pollyanna Jonesposted 19 months ago

    I'm seeing a lot of this around the internet now. And a lot of debate.

    It started with art, now it's affecting writing.

    These apps are allowing people to enter prompts. The app skims the internet for content, chews it up, then creates something for the user to claim as their own original work. Artists and writers are having work skimmed by this technology without their permission. I expect much of the content in here has been produced by it now, why spend 8 hours on a piece when you can churn something out in seconds?

    I have some questions.

    1. What is this platform's stance on A.I?
    2. Are you banning articles and illustrations created using this?
    3. What measures are you taking to protect your content creators against A.I. skimming?

    1. Matt Wells profile imageSTAFF
      Matt Wellsposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Articles created by AI are considered spinning and violate our TOS. We ban accounts that are created with automated tools such as AI, article spinners, translators, etc. We are continuously working on creating tools to keep up with current technology.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Matts, your reply is timely. Thanks.

    2. Jan Stepan profile image91
      Jan Stepanposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for bringing this debate up to the table. I am also very concerned and worried about AI technology. I don't get why these technologies were created in the first place. It should be banned.

      It's effectively killing the job market, not just regarding creative works such as writing, art, photography, et cetera. Even other industries will struggle hard, for instance, the automotive industry. Drivers may soon lose their job because of AI-driving technology. It's inevitable.

      The same goes for journalists and writers. AI technology is rapidly improving, and who knows how far it will go before even these professions start to disappear, simply because AI will be able to do similar jobs, only much faster.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        AI is dumb without an human intelligent behind it.                                                     Could you confidently board a bus or taxi, or a sea going vessel, or a jet plane being pilot by a robot AI?                                           But I would be in a class where it could blab out basic English Language, or Economics.

      2. janshares profile image90
        jansharesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        You laid out our concerns very well, Jan. It's sad to think how bleak the future is when we consider the use/misuse of AI. It's like the creation of Frankenstein.

        1. Jan Stepan profile image91
          Jan Stepanposted 19 months agoin reply to this

          It is indeed! A Frankenstein smart enough to evolve himself, that's the absolute scariest part of it all. I am not super optimistic either regarding the future but let's see.

    3. Mike Grindle profile image95
      Mike Grindleposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for bringing this up. I can't help but notice that there's been an influx of new accounts popping up, following everyone and uploading dozens of articles in a matter of hours. Thankfully, they don't seem to be getting too far in their pursuits at the moment.
      Good to know that hubpages are working on the issue and have a zero-tolerance policy.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Not just Hubpages. Other websites has they own plagiarism checkers, espcially academic institutions.

        1. Mike Grindle profile image95
          Mike Grindleposted 19 months agoin reply to this

          The problem, as I understand it is that most tools aren't yet advanced to catch newer AI (namely Chatgpt) out. After all, these AIs aren't just copying, pasting and rewording content. Instead, they're forming new, and sometimes nuanced, ideas.

          I've already seen writing platforms shut down, citing Chatgpt as the cause, and heard reports of students acing their exams using the technology. I've also seen job postings on places like UpWork specifically asking writers to use AI!

          I don't think quality, experienced writers have much to worry about yet, but it will be interesting to see what how the online writing market evolves over the next few months.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
            Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

            Yes, I agree completely with you. But have you noted Matt's respond earlier?                                 Seriously, not all writing plantforms are giving up on the Chatgpt challenge.                                      An online magavine or newspaper that support Chatgpt is likde encouraging malware and other coputer virus.

          2. janshares profile image90
            jansharesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

            Wow, this is pretty serious, Mike. I noticed someone who followed me recently after 3 days on HP but had 14 articles! I was shocked and wondered how he did that. Thanks for the heads up.

            1. Mike Grindle profile image95
              Mike Grindleposted 19 months agoin reply to this

              Perhaps we saw the same person? Of course, it's not impossible that someone might write a bunch of articles and upload them all at once. However, when you read through these articles it's immediately clear that something isn't quite right...

              In any case, we certainly live in interesting times!

              1. janshares profile image90
                jansharesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

                I'll have to check my email. He's (she, they) probably reading this thread right now. Yes, interesting times for sure.

  2. Pollyanna Jones profile image93
    Pollyanna Jonesposted 19 months ago

    That's very reassuring to know, thank you for your reply!

  3. janshares profile image90
    jansharesposted 19 months ago

    I heard about this A.I. thing for writing term papers, articles, speeches, etc. People are excited about the technology but it's plagiarism, right? I find it very concerning. Major issues with copyrights infringement and ownership. Scary times we live in.

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
      Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

      jans? Yes, it's plagiarism, or theft of original content. Thanks.

      1. janshares profile image90
        jansharesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Absolutely.

    2. CYong74 profile image95
      CYong74posted 19 months agoin reply to this

      Major, legit SEO services like VidIQ and Ubersuggest now have AI functions too. I think that's even more horrifying.

      1. theraggededge profile image87
        theraggededgeposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Also, Notion, a note-taking and productivity tool has now incorporated it.

        The way I see it is that AI might be useful in several ways. Not to write content but as a sort of kickstart to your own creative work. I had a go with a free trial and there was no way it could have worked here or on any legitimate platform. However, what it does do is to give you something to edit, to work with, and to make your own voice come to life.

        It seems mainly geared toward topics like blogging, finance, and AI itself. Not so great at, for example, relationships. It's very bland, run-of-the-mill, and contradictory.

        I've said on other threads that it is glaringly obvious when someone is attempting to pass AI-generated text off as their own. At the moment it can't produce that spark of originality that marks a decent writer.

        Once it can do that, then we're finished.

        1. CYong74 profile image95
          CYong74posted 19 months agoin reply to this

          I agree with that. I also tried what VidIQ suggested for a YouTube upload of mine and while what's suggested was kinda stilted, I suppose it would pass for a first draft to improve on.

          But I ultimately didn't use it because of pride, and because I just can't be sure whether the text was dug from.

        2. Miebakagh57 profile image69
          Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

          'Once it can do that then, we're finished'.                                      AI can't. It takes thinking and brainstorming. Is AI being that programmed?

  4. Jodah profile image91
    Jodahposted 19 months ago

    Glad to know HubPages is trying to keep on top of this. I have read articles created by AI and they are quite impressive, so it is concerning.

  5. Kenna McHugh profile image94
    Kenna McHughposted 19 months ago

    AI is not writing. It's for lazy people, trying to make money with working for it.

    1. janshares profile image90
      jansharesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      +1

  6. Gregory DeVictor profile image98
    Gregory DeVictorposted 19 months ago

    Someone who joined HP four days ago very recently published about 12 articles in a 30-hour period. I sent an email to the team about this person, and Matt is looking into the matter.

    1. Jan Stepan profile image91
      Jan Stepanposted 19 months agoin reply to this

      12 articles in 30 hours sound very suspect. That's impossible to accomplish if written well and well-researched.

    2. tsmog profile image85
      tsmogposted 19 months ago

      Interested in the topic I poked about looking into copyright and AI. The one below is regarding images and not text. Seems there are two elements to consider - Input and Output. For more peek at the article. Skim down until you reach "Is AI-Generated Art Copyright Infringement?".

      Using AI Artwork to Avoid Copyright Infringement by CopyRightLately (Oct 24, 2022)
      https://copyrightlately.com/using-ai-ar … ringement/

      This one should grab some attention. It is by Content Marketing Institute (Apr 28, 2022). What caught my attention was they said; "Why AI won’t replace writers." From the article is the following:

      "If you’re reading this, you recognize the value of content marketing. You’ve probably also seen articles predicting that AI and machine learning will eventually replace the need for human workers across a broad spectrum of industries and roles. But when it comes to content marketing, creative marketers need not worry about machines taking over their jobs and rendering them obsolete.

      The role tech will play is much more nuanced. Content is essentially a form of communication between two human beings; while automation can certainly enhance many aspects of its creation and delivery, it probably will never replace writers entirely.

      Instead, it will make the writing process easier and more intuitive than ever, unlocking new opportunities for creators and dramatically transforming how marketers approach high-quality content creation at every level."

      How AI Will Power the Future of Successful Content Marketing
      https://contentmarketinginstitute.com/a … ing-future

      They emphasize; "3 ways AI will empower writers"

      ** Writer’s block will become a thing of the past
      ** Writers will work faster
      ** Writers will learn more as they write

      If curious peek at one of the leading software companies' website. One thing to note is you can get a Free account. (In other words it is not coming . . . it is Here, Now)

      Copy.ai
      https://www.copy.ai/?via=NPM

      Please note, simply offering food for thought with what I discovered.

      1. PaulGoodman67 profile image95
        PaulGoodman67posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Yes, it's already here.

        The early attempts by software to create content (known as "spinning") were very crude and essentially useless.

        Nowadays, I see work on here that's pretty convincing, at least on a surface level.

        Where the machines struggle, though, is in understanding the meaning of words, especially when they're employed within a specific context. English has lots of synonyms, but the meanings are rarely exactly the same, they usually have subtly different implications.

        Turns of phrase are also often misinterpreted by the software, as is humor. They also aren't so good at employing literary devices, such as alliteration.

        The big, underlying problem, in my experience, is that AI can generate writing on a surface level but is unable to grasp what lies behind the collections of words, phenomena like concepts, and intent.

        It will take a huge leap to change that.

      2. janshares profile image90
        jansharesposted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Thanks for the info, tsmog. Very helpful and informative. Sounds like what Bev (theraggededge) said above.

    3. theraggededge profile image87
      theraggededgeposted 19 months ago
      1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Thanks Bev for the link. It's a good read. But I strongly detested whatever AI write and published.
        A writer should use his/her mind and develop. That's the only way I know.
        Copying others is stealing.
        In my primary school days, I was asked as an assignment to or home work to do some sentences with some words. I just bring up my dictionary and copy easy sentences therein. Here's the verdict of the teacher: 'out of points. You have just copy".
        That taught me a lesson and I've never ever did that again. If I copy, I'll put that in quotation marks. Have a wonderful weekend, Bev. Thanks.

    4. Pollyanna Jones profile image93
      Pollyanna Jonesposted 19 months ago

      Thank you Bev, yes that is interesting.

      On the other comments, yes, I would be very suspicious of accounts publishing a high number of articles in a short space of time. A basic article for me takes about eight hours - so at best I might do three in one weekend. But that volume, 12 in 30 hours is a red flag to me.

      There are AI "authors" self publishing on a well known shopping/ebooks platform - skimming and rehashing blogs and other articles - one "author" has published over 300 books in one year. Because there's no mind behind it, most of the information presented is wrong, and in places just pure nonsense.

      But AI learns, the more it is used. I worry that soon people will be able to use it to produce convincing papers for their college work and breeze through and gain a qualification without actually learning anything.

      Hoping the tools to catch this out evolve as quickly as the technology to create this stuff does.

    5. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
      Stephen Tomkinsonposted 19 months ago

      You might find this opinion piece interesting:
      https://www.commonwealmagazine.org/arti … -Heidegger

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        Yes, and quite interesting. But can you recalled when you attempted to login to a website, say Google, it ask you to prove that you're human?                                 My take is that the human creative mind says a lot more than AI programmed mind.

    6. PaulGoodman67 profile image95
      PaulGoodman67posted 19 months ago

      I personally would like to see a specialist group of staff formed to tackle the A.I. operatives.

      This specialist group would be given the means to take down the replicants.

      I suggest that they be called "blade runners."

      big_smile

    7. Stephen Tomkinson profile image89
      Stephen Tomkinsonposted 19 months ago

      Or Ghost Busters, perhaps?

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image69
        Miebakagh57posted 19 months agoin reply to this

        That's not how things are done.
        These experts will meet problems.
        The most forwarding and 'impert'ing personality should be the guy to be named after the result.

     
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