Animal Cruelty in China

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  1. ethel smith profile image82
    ethel smithposted 8 years ago

    Hi All, I know that cruelty in its many forms if rife around the world however I am focusing on animal cruelty in China here. My second hub re this behaviour has attracted various comments.
    The consenus seems to be that we must try and do something. What I am not sure.
    I wondered about starting a petiion at http://www.care2.com/find/petition although there seems to have been others in the past.
    Has anyone got any good ideas about highlighting these atorcities and others? Would a hubtrail be insensitive?

  2. kerryg profile image86
    kerrygposted 8 years ago

    I saw a video once of workers on a Chinese fur farm skinning animals alive. It was one of the most horrible things I've ever seen or heard. Such cruelty certainly is not confined to China, but raising awareness of the issues there can only help the cause worldwide.

    1. profile image0
      cosetteposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      how can any advanced civilization not be aware of animal cruelty? i have heard that they are raising giant rabbits in North Korea to feed people as they feed a lot and are cheap and prolific breeders, which makes me sick to my stomach. rabbits are extremely intelligent and sensitive creatures and very easily spooked. they KNOW what humans are doing to them and they know what humans will do to them. they are already a prey animal and fear that someone will eated them at any time and you must reassure them and show them love and compassion. only then do they relax and give you their trust. i am sure when they go to slaughter they know exactly what is about to befall them and they feel unimaginable terror. people who eat rabbits - aren't there enough little creatures to stuff yourself with?

      ugh mad

      Ethel, ask if they can make your topic a Weekly Hub topic. that will give it exposure.

      1. ethel smith profile image82
        ethel smithposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        That's a great idea. Sorry for the late reply.
        A Hub reader has created a blog at http://animalabuseinchina.blogspot.com/
        This incorporates a link to dreadful happenings.
        Hubpages would a great place to highlight these atrocities

        1. profile image0
          Home Girlposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Don't forget that China is a communist country. Human cruelty is  norm there, don't forget that. Just open your mouth a little wider there and they will skin you alive like a mink or a rabbit.

          1. ethel smith profile image82
            ethel smithposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Yes I know that is true but it does not make it right does it?

            1. Polly C profile image95
              Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              No, it isn't right, it makes me feel really sad and sickened whenever I hear of these stories.  I'm not sure what the answer is though - there has already been quite a lot of exposure and petitions about animal cruelty in China, and yet nothing has changed. Seems like they don't care what other people think.

      2. psycheskinner profile image83
        psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Of course this is equally true of, for example, the US (foie gras, farm animal castration without anesthetic, cosmetic surgery on pets, transportation of animals for days without water or rest etc)

  3. Misha profile image70
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    What Alla was trying to say - I think - is that there are more burning issues in China than animal cruelty. But then to each their own of course. smile

  4. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    Some friends and I had this very discussion over dinner last night. If everyone who cares about human rights and animal abuse STOPS financing these atrocities, perhaps it would help. Don't buy stuff made in China!

    Even U.S. drug labs are operating in China because they can get away with torturing and neglecting helpless animals. The pharm companies got tired of all the rules in America, so they just moved their labs to China, where they can operate freely, without a critical public or pesky regulations.

    HOW do these people sleep at night??

    1. Misha profile image70
      Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Holle, somehow you tend to forget that China seems to own the USA. You can't really command your master, ya know smile

    2. psycheskinner profile image83
      psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      US drug companies have to follow the same standards in their China plants as their US plants.

    3. Polly C profile image95
      Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Habee, I totally agree about the principle of avoiding stuff made in China - however, in practice that is virtually impossible. Some things you can't seem to buy from anywhere else. I am always looking at the labels of the things I buy, as I really prefer to buy from countries where I know employee working conditions are likely to be better, but nowadays they are few and far between.

      Still, it's the fault of our societies, for wanting all these products, yet also wanting to pay low prices.

      1. psycheskinner profile image83
        psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        It is also a reason people in Europe boycott factory farmed meat, cage eggs and hormone stimulated milk from the US.  What's good for the goose?

        1. Polly C profile image95
          Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Well, I do boycott all those things, but it is very easy to find alternatives. Not sure why someone from Europe would need milk from the US, though.

  5. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    That is so sad, yet true, Misha. I still don't have to buy stuff made in China, though!

    1. Misha profile image70
      Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      O yeah, you don't have to. Which frankly leaves you with a lot of money and without any goods though... smile

  6. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    Wrong, Misha. Some pals and I did some in-store research on this last year. We couldn't find anything we needed or wanted that could not be purchased form another country or from American workers!

    1. psycheskinner profile image83
      psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Okay, name a dog food brand not make from Chinese processed ingredients.

      1. habee profile image93
        habeeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Sure! Old Glory, Omnipro, Black Gold, and Flint River Ranch (which I use and wrote a hub about!).

        1. psycheskinner profile image83
          psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          At least two of those I know import ingredients (Omni, BG)--they blend in the US. And I don't think I can buy any of them at my current supermarket.

          1. habee profile image93
            habeeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            You can buy FRR pet food online. It's 100% American.

            1. psycheskinner profile image83
              psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Buy it where?  And at what price (including shipping).

              Giving up all Chinese derived products may be possible but it is not easy or cheap.

              Also it means supporting the inclusion of unlabeled GM grain.

              Bottom line is I look at China en masse and US en masse, I am not sure I see the need to boycott.

    2. Misha profile image70
      Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Cool, I am not saying I agree this is a feasible thing to do - but definitely go for it then - if you want. smile

  7. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    I've had debates about underwear and athletic shoes, too. Several US companies make underwear, and New Balance makes athletic shoes.

    I'm not saying to ONLY buy American. I'm suggesting not to buy from China.

    By the way, Flint River Ranch is in GA, my home state.

  8. psycheskinner profile image83
    psycheskinnerposted 8 years ago

    Bottom line, I think I could show you video if creulty just as bad from the US.  Look on YouTube (calves beaten, chick ground up alive, 10 million strays euthanised every year).  So is this really just about cruelty?  If I was coming back as a random animal in one of the two countries, I would not automatically chose the US.  We just become blind to the cruelty in our back yards.

    1. habee profile image93
      habeeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Notice I mentioned human rights, too. Don't you agree that that aspect of society is much better in the US? Have you ever been to China?

      1. psycheskinner profile image83
        psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        So you are conceding there is no clear case to be made based on animal cruelty alone?  Because if so I would be happy to move on to talkign about human rights--and the role of American multi-nationals in that.

        1. habee profile image93
          habeeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          No, I do not concede. Animals in China suffer far more abuses than animals in the US. Read Ethel Smith's recent hub about entertainment in China - even for kids. It's sickening. Things like that are outlawed here.

          Here's where to order FRR:

          https://extranet.securefreedom.com/Flin … at=DOG|ALL

          1. psycheskinner profile image83
            psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            I asked whether you think China is overall more abusive of animals than the US?  I don't.  Both countries abuse animals for economic reasons--but in different ways.  But as I said, if you instantly became a totally random animal in each country... I think your chances of a good versus bad life would be about even.

            1. habee profile image93
              habeeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              I definitely believe that animal cruelty is far more common and accepted in China. Does that sufficiently answer your question? I've done a lot of research on the subject.

            2. Polly C profile image95
              Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              I would think that China has some of the worst animal welfare scenarios in the world.

              On the other side of the coin, I think the UK probably has some of the best. (Of course, I am not suggesting there is no cruelty, because there is, but when compared to an awful lot of other countries, I think it does better.)

              I haven't been to the US, but would still bet all my money that conditions are a million times better than China, and is probably a country where animal welfare conditions are considered good, when compared to the rest of the world.

          2. Polly C profile image95
            Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, I read about that in the paper I think  - people, including children, laughing at the horrific cruelty Chinese bears are subject to. It is a totally different mindset. In our countries, most children grow up with an affinity for animals, and they are largely unaware of the abuse of some livestock. In China, it seems as though they grow up without the same respect for animals.

            The abuse is horrific, but also I think animal welfare in our societies has improved a lot over the decades, especially in zoos and wildlife parks.

            1. habee profile image93
              habeeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Exactly, Polly! It is a different mindset - generally speaking. I'm sure that all Chinese don't feel that way, though.

    2. Polly C profile image95
      Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I understand what you are saying - China is not the only country where animals are treated appallingly. It's quite true, many animals kept for farming are not treated well - dairy farming has come under scrutiny, and the treatment of many chickens and turkeys is just horrible. That makes me sad and angry as well. And I have even read stories where domestics cats have been kidnapped and killed in Belgium for fur (I am in England). There are so many tales of cruelty and personally I would like to stop them all.

      1. psycheskinner profile image83
        psycheskinnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I think the answer is not just to translate outrage into discrimination against an entire country--but to buy products from specific companies that your trust.  that includes buying locally, but not just because don't--for whatever reason--like all of China.  (Which is, overall, rather a nice place).

  9. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    Don't get me wrong - I'm not happy with the way animals are treated in the US, either. In fact, I've written several hubs on the topic. But at least we have laws in place to curtail some of it. I suppose it's a matter of degrees.

  10. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    I buy locally whenever I can. We used to raise our own cattle, pigs, and chickens, too. They were all free range and well treated. when it was time for slaughter, it was done as quickly and as painlessly as possible.

    I don't hate all Chinese. I hate the attitudes that many of them have toward their fellow man and their fellow earthly inhabitants.

  11. psycheskinner profile image83
    psycheskinnerposted 8 years ago

    I am signing off now.  But, bottom line, saying a country and every product it makes should be boycotted sounds like discrimination to me.  I think the people that do wrong, should be punished--not everyone that happens to share their citizenship.  That just isn't fair.

    If you want to buy local to help you community, that's fine.  but not because the Chinese are all 'bad'.

  12. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    From what I've learned, things might be a little better for animals in the UK than in the US. Good for you guys!

    1. Polly C profile image95
      Polly Cposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Really? I'm not sure, there are still lots of horrible things that I hate (and I think that Ethel might have written hubs about some of them as well). I'm just comparing it to what I've seen when I've been in other countries (animals stuffed in tiny cages and left in the hot sun, for instance, and just generally being mistreated. Turkey was one such country).

      I am totally against caged chickens, who are fattened up to a ridiculous size and have no more than an A4 size square to stand in. Some of them die, sometimes their legs break from the weight. That is something I would love to see abolished.

 
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