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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (14 posts)

Can the Post Office Survive the Digital Age?

  1. daskittlez69 profile image75
    daskittlez69posted 6 years ago

    With all of the technology that we have now and with the fact that the Post Office is losing money left, right, and sideways.  Do you think it will survive?

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Now that's one government job market that I wouldn't mind my tax dollars bailing out if need be.

      I think it will survive.  I hope it survives.

      I saw a clip about this on the news.  They're asking for approval for cutbacks, like cancelling Saturday hours, etc.   That might be a good idea, until maybe the technologic revolution burns itself out;  then the USPS could eventually get back to its original usage.

  2. R.S. Hutchinson profile image84
    R.S. Hutchinsonposted 6 years ago

    I sure hope so!!! I need the PO (and thier great service/price) for my business!! I've been watching this intensly. This is ONE bailout I'd approve because I DO understand WHY they are in the predicament they are in and in contrast to the BANKS bailouts.. it has nothing to do with greed.

  3. Reality Bytes profile image82
    Reality Bytesposted 6 years ago

    UPS and FedEx are making money.   They are also more efficient IMO!

    1. R.S. Hutchinson profile image84
      R.S. Hutchinsonposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      and way more expnesive for small businesses.

      1. Reality Bytes profile image82
        Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Obviously the USPS does not charge enough to remain solvent.  Would it not make sense to raise rates on those that use the service vs using taxpayer money to subsidize needless services.


        Some people have no need for Postal service!

        *raises hand*

        1. TamCor profile image81
          TamCorposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Actually, I think they'd be smart to LOWER prices.  When I sold full-time on eBay, I had to start shipping through DHL, because their prices were so much cheaper.  Granted, I didn't have to pay--the people who bought my items did, but the lower I could offer shipping, the more they could bid on the item.

          USPS was sometimes double the cost for some bigger sized boxes. I didn't want to switch--I liked the convenience of using the post office much better.

          It might be a good idea for them to at least consider adjusting their rates to make them more competitive with the other companies...inside the U.S., at least. It's hard to believe they could be in such financial straits, with all the internet shopping being done now...

        2. R.S. Hutchinson profile image84
          R.S. Hutchinsonposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Well the bigger picture is that many bussineses rely on using the PO because they are cheaper. Those things you order from online are soemtimes deliverd via the PO. If the PO goes, then business' will have to raise thier prices because they will be forced to use UPS/FEdEX so in the long run you pay for it one way or the other.

          1. Reality Bytes profile image82
            Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            If I do not order anything. Nor if I have any use of the USPS why should my tax dollars subsidize someone else's package.


            The USPS needs to turn a profit or at least break out even. 

            Possibly they may have to take a look at employee benefit packages?  Either way the USPS needs to find a way to be solvent on its own.

            1. R.S. Hutchinson profile image84
              R.S. Hutchinsonposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              Sure you may not order anything but it trickles down to you via the bigger picture.. if prices go up because businesses now have to use UPS or something else then less people spend, more jobs cut, prices for products go up.. eventually that shirt you buy in the mall or store, or whatever goes up and you have to pay for the hike. It's all woven together.

              You don't think UPS would hike thier prices if the competition (PO) went out of business? You betcha they would because they know all those businesses that once relied on the PO will now have to use UPS.

              It's alllllll connected.

              1. Reality Bytes profile image82
                Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                OR possibly entrepreneurs would fill the void?

                Without the USPS there would be enough experienced people that could succeed on their own.


                Even if they only covered small areas, there would be plenty of competition for your shipping dollars?

    2. psycheskinner profile image82
      psycheskinnerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Of course they are, they can charge what they want to refuse to deliver to outlying islands and other inhospitable/expensive places.

      1. Reality Bytes profile image82
        Reality Bytesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        If you want to send a letter to Katmandu, should I be forced to help you pay for the benefit?

    3. psycheskinner profile image82
      psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

      They need to be freed up by Congress to gather other income streams.  Post Offices in most countries solved the problem by diversifying.

     
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