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CSS MUSCOGEE | CSS JACKSON | US Civil War Ironclad

Updated on November 13, 2012

CSS Muscogee Also Known as CSS Jackson

CSS Muscogee also known as CSS Jackson was a Confederate States Navy ironclad ram, powered by a steam driven screw and deployed on the Chattahoochee River during the American Civil War. She was built at Columbus, Georgia, and launched in December of 1864. In April of 1865, the still incomplete CSS Muscogee (or CSS Jackson, as she was also called) was captured and burned by Union Army forces. Her remains were recovered during the 1960s from the portion of the river inside the boundaries of Fort Benning and placed on exhibit at the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus. (From Wikipedia)

CSS Muscogee | CSS Jackson - Confederate States Navy Ironclad Ram

CSS Muscogee also known as CSS Jackson was a Confederate States Navy ironclad ram, powered by a steam driven screw and deployed on the Chattahoochee River during the American Civil War.

Type: Ironclad Ram Launched: December 22, 1864 At: Confederate States Yard, Columbus, Georgia

Length: 223 feet, 6 inches Beam: 56 feet, 6 inches Draft: 8 feet

Armament: Four 7-inch Brooke Rifles; two 6.4-inch Brooke Rifles; two 12 pounder boat howitzers.

She was built at Columbus, Georgia, and launched in December of 1864. In April of 1865, the still incomplete CSS Muscogee (or CSS Jackson, as she was also called) was captured and burned by Union Army forces. Her remains were recovered during the 1960s from the portion of the river inside the boundaries of Fort Benning and placed on exhibit at the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus. (From Wikipedia)

Iron Afloat: The Story of the Confederate Armorclads

by William N. Still

Everyone knows the story of the battle of the Monitor and the Merrimack. But how many people know the story behind the Confederacy's attempt to build a fleet of armorclad vessels of war? Built from converted steam ships, built on riverbeds and cornfields. Learn how the Confederacy built a fleet of ironclads that were more than a match for anything from the Northern invaders.

CSS Jackson | CSS Muscogee

CSS Jackson | CSS Muscogee
CSS Jackson | CSS Muscogee

The CSS Virginia: Sink Before Surrender Published by The History Press

by John V. Quarstein

The morning the CSS Virginia (formerly the USS Merrimack) slowly steamed down the Elizabeth River toward Hampton Roads on March 8, 1862, naval warfare changed forever. Wooden sailing ships became obsolete, armored, steam-powered vessels where the new dreadnaughts. Little did the ironclad's crew realize that their makeshift warship would achieve the greatest Confederate naval victory. The trip was thought by most of the crew to be a trial cruise. Instead, the Virginia's aggressive commander, Franklin Buchanan, transformed the voyage into a test by fire that forever proved the supreme power of iron over wood.

The Virginia's ability to beat the odds to become the first ironclad to enter Hampton Roads stands as a testament to her designers, builders, officers and crew. Virtually everything about the Virginia s design was an improvisation or an adaptation, characteristic of the Confederacy's efforts to wage a modern war with limited industrial resources. Noted historian John V. Quarstein recounts the compelling story of this ironclad underdog, providing detailed appendices, including crew member biographies and a complete chronology of the ship and crew.

CSS Muscogee/Jackson Videos

CSS Virginia Limited Edition

This is a full assembled ready for display museum quality replica of the CSS Virginia, formerly the USS Merrimack. This model is 34" long by 7" wide and 9" high, 1/96 scale. Built of high quality wood and brass detail parts. These museum-quality scale Civil War replicas of one of history's most famous warships produced as Limited Edition ironclad models of the famous CSS Virginia, are certain to enthrall even the most discriminating naval historian or Civil War buff.

What Happened to the Civil War Ironclads?

Final Resting Place

The CSS Jackson also know as the Muscogee was destroyed to prevent capture in the Chattahoochee River on April 17, 1865. The wreck was raised in 1963 and is on display at Woodruff Museum (Confederate Naval Museum) in Columbus, Georgia.

Ironclad Down: USS Merrimack-CSS Virginia from Design to Destruction

Ironclad Down by Carl Park is the result of over fifteen years of research, This book is filled with detailed information about one of history's most famous vessels, the CSS Virginia. Carl Park spends time describing the incredibly interesting characters of the time, like John Mercer Brooke and John Porter, the designers of the CSS Virginia and Stephen Russell Mallory, Confederate Secretary of the Navy. Park describes the ship, how it was built and every detail you can think of.

Carl Park, a modeler with articles in Fine Scale Modeler originally intented to build an accurate model of the ship. He found out quickly that trying to reconciling the conflicting and incomplete information about the CSS Virginia stopped his plans. He never built the model. In its place he wrote Ironclad Down, a valuable addition to naval history.

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CSS GEORGIA | US Civil War Ironclad
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CSS Albemarle was an ironclad ram of the Confederate Navy named for a town and a sound in North Carolina and a county in Virginia. All three locations were n...

CSS MANASSAS | US Civil War Ironclad
CSS Manassas, formerly the steam propeller Enoch Train, was built at Medford, Massachusetts, by J. O. Curtis in 1855. A New Orleans commission merchant, Capt...

CSS TENNESSEE | US Civil War Ironclad
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Have You Ever Heard of the CSS Jackson or CSS Muscogee? - Ironclad of the US Civil War

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    • Paperquest5 profile image
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      Paperquest5 5 years ago

      @Virginia Allain: Yes, there were many ironclads besides the Monitor and the Merrimack, CSS Virginia. Many of the confederate ones never saw battle or were never completed. The union build many more Monitor types and also many what they called City class ironclads. It is a very fascinating subject. Thanks for dropping by, vallain!

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 5 years ago from Central Florida

      I had no idea there were so many of these ironclads. The Monitor and the Merrimac crossed my radar in history class, but I didn't read beyond that, I guess. Quite interesting.