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CSS NASHVILLE | US Civil War Ironclad

Updated on November 13, 2012

CSS Nashville

CSS Nashville was a large side-wheel steam ironclad built by the Confederates at Montgomery, Alabama intended to exploit the availability of riverboat engines. Launched in mid-1863, Nashville was taken to Mobile, Alabama for completion in 1864. Part of her armor came from the Baltic. Her first commander was Lieutenant Charles CArroll Simms, CSN.

Still fitting out, she took no part in the Battle of Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864. She helped fend off attacks on Spanish Fort, Al. 27 Mar 65, supported Confederate commander Randall L Gibson until driven away by Federal batteries and shelled Federal troops near Fort Blakely 2 Apr 65. Retreated up Tombigbee River 12 Apr 65 when Mobile surrendered. Was one of the vessels formally surrendered by Commodore Ebenezer Farrand, CSN, at  Nanna Hubba, Alabama on May 10, 1865. Commanders: Lieutenant Charles Carroll Simms (64), Lt. John W. Bennett (late 64 -May 65).

CSS Nashville

Civil War Ironclads

Although never quite finished, she had been heavily armored with triple 2-inch plating forward and around her pilot house, only a single thickness aft and there had been some doubts expressed that her builders might have overestimated her structural strength. Rear Admiral Henry K. Thatcher, USN, wrote on June 30, 1865, after survey, "She was hogged when surrendered and is not strong enough to bear the weight of her full armor." He was certain "she could not live in a seaway."

Nashville was purchased by the Navy Department and sold to breakers at New Orleans, Louisiana on November 22, 1867, her iron sheathing having been removed for naval use.

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What Happened to the Civil War Ironclads?

Final Resting Place

The CSS Nashville surrendered at Nanna Hubba Bluff in Tombigbee River, Alabama on May 10, 1865. It was sold to be broken up on November 22, 1867.

CSS Virginia (Merrimack)

Model Boat

These museum-quality scale Civil War replicas of one of history’s most famous warships produced as Limited Edition ironclad models of the famous CSS Virginia, are certain to enthrall even the most discriminating naval historian or Civil War buff

CSS NEUSE | US Civil War Ironclad
The CSS Neuse was a sister ship to the CSS Albemarle. The CSS Neuse was one of 22 ironclads commissioned by the Confederate navy. Having a wide, flat bottom,...

CSS ALBEMARLE | Ironclad of The Roanoke | US Civil War Armorclad
CSS Albemarle was an ironclad ram of the Confederate Navy named for a town and a sound in North Carolina and a county in Virginia. All three locations were n...

CONFEDERATE IRONCLADS of the US Civil War
The battle between the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia, (formerly the USS Merrimack) two of the Civil War Ironclads, started one of the biggest changes in N...

CSS TEXAS | US Civil War Ironclad
The keel for the CSS Texas was laid down at Richmond, Virginia. She was launched in January 1865. At the time of Robert E. Lee's evacuation of Richmond on ...

CSS ATLANTA | US Civil War Ironclad
CSS Atlanta was originally the English blockade runner Fingal, built at Glasgow, Scotland, in 1861. She was procured by the Confederate Government in 1862 an...

The CSS Virginia: Sink Before Surrender

The CSS Virginia: Sink Before Surrender Published by The History Press

by John V. Quarstein

The morning the CSS Virginia (formerly the USS Merrimack) slowly steamed down the Elizabeth River toward Hampton Roads on March 8, 1862, naval warfare changed forever. Wooden sailing ships became obsolete, armored, steam-powered vessels where the new dreadnaughts. Little did the ironclad's crew realize that their makeshift warship would achieve the greatest Confederate naval victory. The trip was thought by most of the crew to be a trial cruise. Instead, the Virginia's aggressive commander, Franklin Buchanan, transformed the voyage into a test by fire that forever proved the supreme power of iron over wood.

The Virginia's ability to beat the odds to become the first ironclad to enter Hampton Roads stands as a testament to her designers, builders, officers and crew. Virtually everything about the Virginia s design was an improvisation or an adaptation, characteristic of the Confederacy's efforts to wage a modern war with limited industrial resources. Noted historian John V. Quarstein recounts the compelling story of this ironclad underdog, providing detailed appendices, including crew member biographies and a complete chronology of the ship and crew.

Ironclad Down: USS Merrimack-CSS Virginia from Design to Destruction

Ironclad Down by Carl Park is the result of over fifteen years of research, This book is filled with detailed information about one of history's most famous vessels, the CSS Virginia. Carl Park spends time describing the incredibly interesting characters of the time, like John Mercer Brooke and John Porter, the designers of the CSS Virginia and Stephen Russell Mallory, Confederate Secretary of the Navy. Park describes the ship, how it was built and every detail you can think of.

Carl Park, a modeler with articles in Fine Scale Modeler originally intented to build an accurate model of the ship. He found out quickly that trying to reconciling the conflicting and incomplete information about the CSS Virginia stopped his plans. He never built the model. In its place he wrote Ironclad Down, a valuable addition to naval history.

CSS Virginia Limited Edition

This is a full assembled ready for display museum quality replica of the CSS Virginia, formerly the USS Merrimack. This model is 34" long by 7" wide and 9" high, 1/96 scale. Built of high quality wood and brass detail parts. These museum-quality scale Civil War replicas of one of history's most famous warships produced as Limited Edition ironclad models of the famous CSS Virginia, are certain to enthrall even the most discriminating naval historian or Civil War buff.

Iron Afloat: The Story of the Confederate Armorclads

by William N. Still

Everyone knows the story of the battle of the Monitor and the Merrimack. But how many people know the story behind the Confederacy's attempt to build a fleet of armorclad vessels of war? Built from converted steam ships, built on riverbeds and cornfields. Learn how the Confederacy built a fleet of ironclads that were more than a match for anything from the Northern invaders.

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CSS Nashville

CSS Nashville
CSS Nashville

Have You Ever Heard of the CSS Nashville? - US Civil War Ironclads

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