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What forms of propulsion is the next breakthrough beyond chem rockets

  1. Credence2 profile image81
    Credence2posted 4 years ago

    As I understand it, we can never seriously speak of exploration of the solar system without an improvement over chemical rockets that produce insufficient energy, thrust to make the journeys feasible.

    What is likely to be the next form of propulsion that will replace it and how soon do you believe it will become available?

    1. A Troubled Man profile image60
      A Troubled Manposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Propulsion is just one of many serious problems with space travel. More importantly, are the problems of radiation in space that kills people. Such high frequency energies pass right through mass, killing anything in it's path. We literally have to build spaceships the size of small moons or large asteroids covered with miles of thick regolith in order to have some level of radiation free living space contained within.

      1. Credence2 profile image81
        Credence2posted 4 years agoin reply to this

        ATM, thanks for sharing your viewpoint, Our propulsion technology limits are abilities to seriously limits manned exploration of our solar system, much beyond the inner planets. In regards to lethal radiation found in space, how do the people of the ISS many who have resided there over a year survive? Do you think that the problem you mention will preclude any serious attempt to send men to Mars, for example?

        1. A Troubled Man profile image60
          A Troubled Manposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          The radiation levels of deep space are very different than that of LEO flights. Certainly, manned missions to Mars would have serious effect on astronauts. More info here...

          http://srag-nt.jsc.nasa.gov/SpaceRadiation/How/How.cfm

          1. Credence2 profile image81
            Credence2posted 4 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks for the link, ATM, if the problem is as grave and the solution you propose is indeed necessary, what with the estimated transit time to Mars fo 8 months, we just as well scrap any serious plans. If NASA is seriously planning a manned landing on Mars in the 2030's I hope that someone is aware of the problem and have a solution on line by this time.

  2. profile image0
    mbuggiehposted 4 years ago
    1. Credence2 profile image81
      Credence2posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Great link, mbuggieh, but it is like the article said, controlled nuclear fusion is always the technology that is 'just around the corner'. I would certainly be pleased if a working model can be made available within my lifetime. Of course, when we get it, it will be a game changer.

      1. profile image0
        mbuggiehposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Most definitely!

 
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