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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (10 posts)

Do you think the degree are important than your ability?

  1. Say Yes To Life profile image78
    Say Yes To Lifeposted 24 months ago

    ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! Ability and social skills are BY FAR the most important in getting a good job.  Steve Jobs dropped out of college, and look how he prospered!  There is a long list of people who have done this - dropped out of high school, even!  On the other hand, there is also a long list of college graduates who are homeless - or close.

    1. Zeron87 profile image98
      Zeron87posted 24 months ago

      Nah.  Experience can make up for a degree, but a degree can never make up for experience.  In the end, employers and clients want to know whether you can do the job or not.  You can bullsh** your way to a degree, but you can't bs your way into a portfolio. 

      That being said, don't underestimate the power of a college education:  Just having it shows you can dedicate yourself to accomplishing a task, that you've surrounded and tempered yourself in your field of study (even if you didn't take your coursework seriously), and statistics show college grads, on average, make more than dropouts (high school or college).  The trick most college grads ignore is you have to combine your education with real work experience to be a good hiring prospect (that's... what internships are for... @_@). College graduates that believe their diplomas alone are worth their weight in gold are the ones who can't find work after graduation.

    2. Tricia Deed profile image90
      Tricia Deedposted 24 months ago

      It is critical to corporations that you have a degree. If someone is hired because of their experience and it is later learned that this person has a high school degree only, other employees with college degrees will be very upset.

      A college degree to an employer represents an employee who has a career interest. Many jobs (usually dead-end employment) do not require a college degree.

      A college degree is only one part of the story, your ability is another. You may have the intellectual ability, but not have a physical working ability for the same task.

      The job which needs to be done determines college degree or not. The trash man does not need a college degree. However, an industrial environmental engineer will need a college degree to manage the trash operation.
      .

    3. Zeron87 profile image98
      Zeron87posted 24 months ago

      Not arguing here, but just pondering this Tricia...  It sounds the biggest reason you stated having a college degree is important is because other employees that went "through the trouble" of getting a degree will be "upset" (which I translate as jealous).  What I have to say to that is freak their feelings. 

      The biggest point I see of a college education is two things: A: to ensure the individual has a rounded education (no matter what job you work, you'll be doing other tasks other than what's in the job description, some problems requiring mathematics others representing yourself through writing), and B. To acquire a document showing you went through the training to understand the basics of what the job requires.  But why do you need a degree to do those things?  What a degree truly represents, at its core, is proving you have the discipline to acquire the knowledge to work in your field (and that you have that knowledge), but not everyone needs a degree to do that.  With independent programs and online resources, it's now easier than ever to emulate a college courseload to its final, desired effect.  All one needs is the discipline to do it.  So, if a person's portfolio and credentials show he or she has what's necessary to accomplish the task, why punish them for already having the discipline others have to pay $5000+ dollars a year for?  I believe that's a trap the business side of education is trying to create in the workforce, by overvaluing what a college degree is.  "If you want to work here, you have to come to us first," that sort of thing.  That is also why having a degree is smarting than not having one though, because of that stigma in society that no other educational opportunities or discipline can equate a college degree.

    4. psycheskinner profile image83
      psycheskinnerposted 24 months ago

      It rather depends on the degree.  A medical degree and associated license are a non-negotiable prerequisite for anyone wanting to stick a scalpel in me.

    5. profile image58
      ayush22posted 23 months ago

      You have a degree and you can get the job instead of the person who is yet undergraduate or in high school,this is an old concept.Degree is just a waste paper if you have no knowledge about what you learned in past four years of the college,a person with the experience,skills and creative mind in same field will never needs a degree.May he just completed his high school only but it depends on how capable you are for required work.I'm not saying that you don't need a degree what i wanted to say is you must have the knowledge what you learning that will help you for the better future.

    6. Paxash profile image98
      Paxashposted 22 months ago

      I think I and many other 20-somethings with college degrees who had a hard time getting any kind of job after graduation could probably attest to the fact that degrees don't mean anything unless you have something else to go along with it.

      I had a hard time finding any kind of job because I had no work experience before graduating college. I've found that prior experience is far more crucial now than a college education.

    7. psycheskinner profile image83
      psycheskinnerposted 21 months ago

      My degree *is* many of my abilities, my degree course taught me specialized skills that I use in my work.

    8. psycheskinner profile image83
      psycheskinnerposted 21 months ago

      All degrees are not equal, any more than all life experience is.  You benefit can from a degree that gives you skills and/or accreditation that open doors for you. or makes you a better person.  Its all about making good choices; degree or no degree.

     
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