This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is used to quickly and efficiently deliver files such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisements has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (11 posts)

How does one teach Children phonetics?

  1. cashmere profile image83
    cashmereposted 9 years ago

    How does one teach Children phonetics?

    What simple methods can one use?

  2. Lisa HW profile image71
    Lisa HWposted 9 years ago

    The easiest thing is to find a program (maybe at the library) that aims to teach phonics.  If that's not possible, new readers need (in a nutshell) to learn the following:

    The sounds for each of the vowels

    The sounds for consonants (including hard and soft sounds for letters like "c" and "g")

    The "blends" of any letters that are often teamed up with others to make completely different sounds.  (st, sw, tr, tw, bl, br, etc.)  Going through the consonants in the alphabet, and thinking of whether each is used in a blend can help you think of all the blends.  Don't forget "th" and also the endings of words, like "ing".

    Children can learn by starting with the simplest of sounds and seeing rhyming words (cat, hat, fat, mat, pat, etc.)  When teaching a sound like "th", instead of rhyming let them them see several words, "this, that, through, thought, thing, etc."  If they see that "th" appears in all those words they should make the connection.

    The above are the most common, most basic, aspects to phonics.  If a child learns that much, it isn't difficult to add a few "fancier" points later.

  3. profile image45
    Deborah Michaelposted 9 years ago

    Call a speech and language pathologist in your area.   You can also try earobics.  I would need to know a bit more about what is going on. A speech and language pathologist can evaluate and refer to more testing, tutoring, or treat themselves. You can get more info at www.NSPT4kids.com

  4. BaliMermaid profile image56
    BaliMermaidposted 8 years ago

    I suggest you try the free information at this internet url address.

    http://www.kidzone.ws/kindergarten/consonants-order.htm

    Good luck,
    Balimermaid

  5. wendypolisi profile image54
    wendypolisiposted 8 years ago

    There are many great tools to help teach your child phonics. 

    Leap Frog has many great tools to help!  The letter wammer is a great place to start!  Also, their letter factory series is great and one my boys asked for quite often.

    Starfall.com is a great free website that teaches phonics.  Kids love it and if your child is very young, it is something that you can share together.

  6. Shanina profile image61
    Shaninaposted 8 years ago

    what i found that worked for me when my daughter was starting to read at 3 and 1/2 was to use the Spot books - you know Spot goes to the Zoo.  they were very repetitive in the use of language. i found that i could then use rhyming words to help build her vocabulary. i found this easier than using phonetics because of the differing sounds and spellings that words have - telephone for example. i did invest in some phonetic flashcards too, but i found that it was easier to match pictures to words to build her vocabulary - man do i ever wish that i had let school teach her to read so that she didn't pick on my speed spelling as i write this. the advantage for me was that she loved the readers that the school sent home and she taught her brother to read with them when he was around the same age.

  7. Silver Poet profile image72
    Silver Poetposted 8 years ago

    Get the DVD called "The Letter Factory" put out by Leap Frog--extremely excellent phonics presentation in a story children like.  For the computer get Reader Rabbit on CD ROM.

  8. profile image0
    WildIrisposted 8 years ago

    The very best book that I have used to teach phonics to my four children is Phonics Pathways.  This book can be used to teach phonics to a young child or an adult in need of remediation.  The book begins simply.  The short vowel sounds are learned separate from any other sound, and each vowel is given a mnemonic picture to remember the sound. Consonants are added to the vowel sound e.g., s-a, s-e, s-i, s-o, s-u. Complexity is added after the student can not just read the sounds but write the sounds too. After the text moves onto reading simple consonant, vowel, consonant word patterns, sentences are introduced to help facilitate the cadence of reading aloud.

    Most important when teaching phonics is knowing when the lesson is jelling in the students mind and when you need to go backward and review concepts taught but not learned.

  9. lanealanea profile image59
    lanealaneaposted 7 years ago

    A very good way is by using the lower case letters in the alphabet. Introduce the sounds just one sound at a time. Not to introduce the letter as A but as the sound a as in apple. The Montessori schools use this teaching method, its called the phonetic alphabet, once the child has learned the sounds they begin to word build the sounds together, creating words and sounding them through. Once they can build and sound out the words they can start to read. Its really great, I taught this for many years and its truly effective, hope this helps. Lanea

  10. pacrapacma profile image60
    pacrapacmaposted 7 years ago

    I have a blog called Beginning Reading Help where I share a number of ways to teach phonics. There's an Amazon Store on my site where I recommend my favorite phonics books.
    I've used Phonics Pathways like WildIris talked about. I know you posted this a while ago. I hope you found some effective ways to teach phonics.

  11. evelynsaenz profile image78
    evelynsaenzposted 6 years ago

    My favorite phonic series is Explode the Code. It is a series of workbooks where children learn the phonics rules in a systematic way from consonants to short vowels to long vowels and on to digraphs, r-controlled vowels etc. Each page has funny cartoon drawings that the children use to determine the correct phonetic element being taught. The activities are repetitive enough to assure mastery but varied enough to keep interest.

    One of my favorite aspects of this series are the sentences with silly pictures. The cat is on the vat. OR The bat is on the rat. In order for the child to know which sentence is correct they must read each of the words using the skill being taught in the lesson.

 
working