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jump to last post 1-15 of 15 discussions (15 posts)

Is there a physical way that one can tell when a person is not telling the truth

  1. primardie profile image63
    primardieposted 7 years ago

    Is there a physical way that one can tell when a person is not telling the truth?

  2. top-bannana profile image61
    top-bannanaposted 7 years ago

    if its a man, then its easy, their lips are moving.  Only kidding, but normally if someone can't look you in the eye its a sure sign they are telling a lie.

  3. Janell Rhiannon profile image61
    Janell Rhiannonposted 7 years ago

    To tell the truth or not to tell the truth...overly strong eye contact is an indication of lying...and so is diverting the eyes.

  4. Neon_Letters profile image60
    Neon_Lettersposted 7 years ago

    It depend on the person, sometimes avoiding eye contact is the answer but sometime it just means they are shy, if they keep to much eye contact it may be because they want to see your reaction to the lie so they can know you believed it, there is just to much to keep in mind to detect a lie, i recomend you to read paul Ekman books.

  5. Rob Bell profile image75
    Rob Bellposted 7 years ago

    They touch their nose while telling the lie.  Also if a person gets excessively angry or defensive if challenged over the lie.

  6. julie58 profile image59
    julie58posted 7 years ago

    Usually, a person's unable to look you straight in the eye; they may blush whilst talking or pull at their shirt collar (if male). Shifting from foot to foot is usually a give-away too

  7. ravenlt04 profile image62
    ravenlt04posted 7 years ago

    Once you get to know people you find they each have his/her own personal "lie indication".  I guess have more non-physical hints than anything.  Some people have a word or phrase they say before or after lying.  Some people's voices change pitch.  Physically, some people roll their eyes or look at the ceiling (avoid eye contact). 

    Some people avoid answering the question.  Some people have sly and manipulative ways of answering.  Some people will try to make you forget what you asked by being charming and nice.  smile

  8. NJ's Ponderings profile image78
    NJ's Ponderingsposted 7 years ago

    When you know people, I mean really know them, then there are tell tale signs.The problem is that we see what we want to see and have a difficult time looking at another individual critically.

    For those who do not lie on a regular basis, there are little tell-tale signs. For example, a person may take a deep breath before telling a fabrication. Or, perhaps they shift their shoulders a touch. Some of the details are very minute and you really have to be paying attention.

    For those who tell lies as easily as they breath, it is very difficult to tell. Perhaps because the person telling the lie also believes the lie.

    Yet, there are some common characteristics in people, such as looking to the left when they are "creating" a story or looking to the right when they are recalling information.

    Interesting question!!

  9. Walt Smith profile image57
    Walt Smithposted 7 years ago

    I have had a few jobs that dealt with the public and therefore the security of them. Anywhere from working the door at the favored night spot to a security officer to a bounty hunter. I have noticed a few "ticks" that might just serve your queary.
    !. Wringing of the hands when answering a question.
    2. Having to pace the floor while talking.
    3. If sitting, not being able to sit still.
    4. Seeming a little hot under the collar, sweating.
    5. Any nervous tick, like twirling the hair or touching of the face repeatedly.
    6.Not making direct eye contact
    7. A little trick I learned if they do try and make eye contact is if they look to their left {your right) when they speak, then they are lying.
    An easy way to remember the last one is...Look Left- Lie
    and Look Right-Correct. I hope this helps you out...W

  10. Tages profile image59
    Tagesposted 7 years ago

    Pulse, lightly place your fingers on their wrist.  You have to ask a couple of questions before hand to get a base line.  You will feel a slight race in their pulse, simultaniously look into their eyes, you will see the pupils expand and shrink in response to increase blood flow.  It does not work on emotional subjects, such as cheating.

    Subtle signs of the eyes, do not make prolonged eye contact or this does not work.
    Left handed:  Eyes will momentarily move to the right
    Right handed: Eyes will momentarily move to the left

    Prolonged eye contact will cause someone to look away, especially under accusation.

  11. AllensPlace11 profile image57
    AllensPlace11posted 7 years ago

    I'm a firm believer that if you are around someone and know someone well, or sometimes even if you don't know them too well, body language will tell you if someone is lying.  Example:  not looking you in the eye, fidgeting, twitching, etc...

  12. DexisView profile image72
    DexisViewposted 7 years ago

    I don't think you really can tell.  When someone is an accomplished liar even they sometimes believe their own lies.

  13. lazko profile image60
    lazkoposted 7 years ago

    Voice
    These include longer delays in speech, an increased number of pauses & increased speech disturbances. When a person is telling the truth, the vocal tone is likely to be more liquid.

    Story Content
    content fabrication - lack of details, a poor logical structure, more negative statements & a general lack of credibility. If a person has had time to prepare a narrative, these indicators will be difficult, if not impossible, to spot.

    Eye Movement
    When a person tries to recall a fact, his eyes tend to move up & to the left. When thinking about the future, his eyes move up & to the right. Thinking about the future involves an act of imagination, as does lying. Therefore, a statement or answer accompanied by an upwards eye movement to the left is likely to be true. This is by no means a foolproof method, but serves as an additional indicator of the truth.

    Nervousness
    Nervousness is sometimes, but not always, a sign that somebody is lying. Signs of nervousness include fidgeting, a slight raise in vocal pitch and pupil dilation. Always bear in mind that nervousness could be the result of additional factors beyond the truthfulness of a person's response. You ought to think about signs of nervousness as part of a wider lie detection method, than as a stand-alone sign of untruthfulness.

  14. tsmog profile image82
    tsmogposted 7 years ago

    I believe it gets harder and easier as we mature. Kids are easier and adults are harder. I go with that adage Ronald Regan made famous "Trust, but verify."

  15. primardie profile image63
    primardieposted 6 years ago

    I was looking for muscle testing. I do this with my students at work. I had a student steal a candy from another student. She refused to admit that she had taken it.  I even saw her take it!  After determining what the truth was with muscle testing, when it came to the lie, the student tested really weak. It is totally amazing. The body never lies.

 
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