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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (6 posts)

Do you think that science can answer questions of morality?

  1. CWanamaker profile image99
    CWanamakerposted 5 years ago

    Do you think that science can answer questions of morality?

  2. peoplepower73 profile image94
    peoplepower73posted 5 years ago

    If you consider psychology as part of science, I think they can come close.  I read a book written by a professor of psychology called: "The Righteous Mind, Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion." 

    His years of  research and analysis indicates that we all have six moral foundations that vary from: Care/Harm; Liberty/Oppression; Fairness/Cheating; Loyalty/Betrayal; Authority/Subversion; and Sanctity/Degradation.  Each one of those is stronger in some than others. This is not the forum for a book review, but I did write a hub page that reviews this book.

    1. CWanamaker profile image99
      CWanamakerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That sounds interesting.  I will check out your hub and then probably thebook.

  3. Bretsuki profile image78
    Bretsukiposted 5 years ago

    I would say not.

    Morality cannot be genralized in scientific terms and is merely a description of genral social conventions and behaviours.  It woyld therefore be difficult for science to prove any moral attitude or belief as being true or false.


    some of the Social Sciences  such as sociology have attempted to explain morality but  these can only answer questions as to why a similar moral question can be seen differently in different societies.

    Since science has a need to find absolute answers to any question. (Something is ir something isn't true) Morality is far too complex as a general term or even in specific terms.

    1. peoplepower73 profile image94
      peoplepower73posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are right.  In that sense morality is relative to the culture.  In some countries, people eat dogs. In others, they would find that morally reprehensible.  But if you take into account all cultures, then it does have scientific basis.

  4. lburmaster profile image83
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    If they can, it is not any time soon. From my own perspective, I entirely doubt that they ever will.

 
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