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How would you explain a pineapple to an Eskimo?

  1. John Sarkis profile image84
    John Sarkisposted 3 years ago

    How would you explain a pineapple to an Eskimo?

    Locke discovered that there was no "a priori" knowledge.  Philosophers have explained Locke by using this concept/question.  You wouldn't be able to explain a pineapple to an Eskimo if you didn't have one handy, because he/she wouldn't understand the concept of a tropical fruit (...in Locke's time, because nowadays, we have access to internet, newspapers, drawings, etc..., and most likely people in the antarctic have seeing a pineapple and know about it...)

  2. DeepThought258238 profile image71
    DeepThought258238posted 3 years ago

    Even though they may have not had prior knowledge, in my opinion they would still have knowledge of shapes and colors. Explaining the shape of a pineapple and it's colors would be able to give them an idea of what a pineapple is. A drawing would only enhance it.

    1. John Sarkis profile image84
      John Sarkisposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, shapes and colors are external stimuli, but concept of 'tropical fruit'?  Remember, you've got no pineapple with you - nothing!  You could be right!  In Locke - even Hume's time, people knew little in contrast to our day.

  3. tsmog profile image83
    tsmogposted 3 years ago

    Understanding the question and a tad of Locke, I would begin asking questions seeking to share the pineapple. Of course knowing where the Eskimo lives and has traveled would be helpful. Some may never have ever experienced dry land with vegetation.

    Do you know what a plant is?
    Do you know what a fruit is?
    Have you ever eaten berries?
    Do you know what a football is?
    Do you know what a palm tree is?
    Do you know how a berry bush grows
    Do you know what sweet is?
    Do you know what sour is?

    If those all are answered no and we have a grasp of a common language I would simply say it tastes good like fish. It is soft and sliced thick like blubber. It tastes better than blubber and better than fish. It is the color of that 'Yellow Snow'. (A ha-ha on Frank Zappa smile

    Otherwise from the yes/no answers above I would seek to share the experience descriptively with feelings and emotions.

    There would be 'a priori' knowledge established in both cases with communication through comparison / contrast. Enough maybe to eliminate the fear of experiencing a pineapple in some form.

    1. John Sarkis profile image84
      John Sarkisposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Today "yes," but when Locke lived, not likely...  Locke lived in a time when travel was very limited...  Furthermore, Eskimos probably stayed close to their place of birth, so they may not have been exposed to the things you're speaking of.

 
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