The Birth Order Question, Part II

  1. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 10 days ago

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    Which birth order is the most successful?  Most adjusted?   Most selfish?  Most selfless?  Most entitled?  Most independent?  Most insecure?  Most confident?  Most conforming?  Most rebellious?  Most depressed?  Most maladjusted?

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 9 days agoin reply to this

      My take on this:

      Most successful- oldest children in small families(2 children per household), only children & youngest children in large/very large families(6-more children per household).
      Most adjusted- only children because they don't have to undergo sibling rivalry, parental favoritism, parental disfavor, & differential treatment based upon birth order.
      Most selfish- youngest children because they are THE CENTER of their parents' universe.
      Most entitled- youngest children
      Most independent-only children
      Most insecure- oldest children because of dethronement & middle children because they are overlooked.
      Most confident- only children because they don't have to vie for parental attention & love nor comparisons that children w/siblings must endure on a constant basis.
      Most conforming- oldest children because they must be in the good graces of their parents if they wish to receive their love & approval & be THE GOOD, PERFECT child in the family. 
      Most rebellious- middle & youngest children.  Middle children because they have to find their place as they are ignored by their families & youngest children to break the family mold or tradition.
      Most depressed- oldest children because they are constantly being inundated w/responsibilities, often from early childhood.  They are also treated harshest by their parents & are cast aside in favor of younger siblings.
      Most maladjusted- oldest & middle children because oldest children are relegated last while middle children are not respected as individuals.

 
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