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Learning While Playing

  1. mingoville profile image45
    mingovilleposted 9 years ago

    Playing is an integral part of childhood, it is through playing that we learn, Studying is also an integral part of childhood.  When a child is in the school age (6-12 yrs. Old), he usually gets his kicks by being an achiever.  It pleases him to be good at class and to know lots of information, when playing and studying are combined into one activity as is the case in edutainment, the childs needs are met.

  2. ripplemaker profile image86
    ripplemakerposted 9 years ago

    Yes, yes, yes!

    Playing for kids can indeed be a learning time.  I watch the kids in school play with the shape sorter box...oh yes, they are learning about shapes and enhancing their visual skills.  By looking at the object in their hand, they have to look for the corresponding hole to put it in.  Or when they are playing with blocks and making towers...they're enhancing their creativity and learning about balance and math. 

    And now, the adults can still play and learn too.

    It's time for me to play.

    lol

    Have fun...

  3. Bob Ewing profile image60
    Bob Ewingposted 9 years ago

    Playing and learning are integral, when we take the play out the learning lessens.

  4. Earl S. Wynn profile image82
    Earl S. Wynnposted 9 years ago

    What we really need is to get a bunch of hot-shot videogame designers together with some awesome script writers and a board of PhDs to make the ultimate learning+playing experience. I think it's possible-- Learning-emphasis videogames are nothing new, I just remember them being corny and un-fun as a kid.

    Well, except number munchers. Now THAT game rocked!

    1. SparklingJewel profile image78
      SparklingJewelposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      There are a lot of educational video game and such, already out there.
      But the variety is endless, and some are worth less and even harmful, to a whole and balanced mind, soul and body.

  5. thranax profile image48
    thranaxposted 9 years ago

    Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally

    P-arenthesis
    E-xponents
    M-ultiply
    D-ivide
    A-dd
    S-ubtract

    Pemdas is just one of the "Fun" ways to learn math operations. It isn't necessarily playing, but its giving information in a playful manner. And Pemdas is good for any math class you take, because thats always how the order goes.

  6. patnamohan profile image62
    patnamohanposted 9 years ago

    Good!

  7. nikkiu profile image61
    nikkiuposted 9 years ago

    In my experience as a Dyslexia Support tutor, I have found that children learn far more when they believe that what they are doing is 'play' not 'work'. Inventive teachers can make a game out of any concept and if it employs all the senses then so much the better.

  8. Smarticus profile image72
    Smarticusposted 9 years ago

    I just posted a hub on the effectiveness of using games in the classroom to enhance learning. I agree one hundred percent.

  9. Princessa profile image84
    Princessaposted 9 years ago

    Through play children can quickly learn other languages.  Whenever we travel it is the children who pick up faster the new language as they enjoy playing with the local children!

    1. ServiceGuide profile image58
      ServiceGuideposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I agree wholeheartedly Princessa.  I study with the Open University and only recently came across a fantastic free learning site that encourages learning through play.  Great for all ages from children to adults.  It's so stimulating that I was prompted to write a hub on it to get the word out as far as possible.

  10. Dottie1 profile image77
    Dottie1posted 9 years ago

    My daughter Tracey took 2 years of Spanish in High School but couldn't carry on a conversation.  Then she got a job at Wendy's fast food chain with 50% Spanish speaking employees.  After listening to them every day for just a few months she decided to speak to them in Spanish.  The Spanish kids were amazed, jumping up and down, hugging her and high fivin coz she spoke their language.  Tracey went on to complete her 5th year of Spanish finishing up with an A.  Tomorrow she is going to a Regional Crew Olympics with them competing in "who can make the fastest sandwich".  She is having a lot of fun.  LOL

  11. RVilleneuve profile image60
    RVilleneuveposted 8 years ago

    Schools are now beginning to realize that too much busy-work can actually hurt a child's learning as it takes away from play and family time. It is so sad how many kids have never played a board game.

  12. Nickny79 profile image70
    Nickny79posted 8 years ago

    This thread sounds like the usual, politically correct, self-esteem rhetoric that continually dumbs down our public schools.  Children need to have command of basic menu of facts, a basic grasp of grammar, reading and  arithematic.  Students do not suffer a net loss when the are compelled to do something that is intellectually unpleasant--it builts the will and often remedies important deficits in body of knowledge at the student's command.  Cultural Literacy  by E.D. Hirsch is an excellent read on this topic.

    Play, without more, is no substitute. I think the amount of time today's students spend on the internet or watching TV should be of more concern than busy work.  There is no doubt that these media have a detrimental effect on attention spans.  I even notice the effect on myself, and literally have to do a series of mental tricks to slow down my mind for dense reading aften having spent an excessive time on the internet.

  13. Nickny79 profile image70
    Nickny79posted 8 years ago

    This thread sounds like the usual, politically correct, self-esteem rhetoric that continually dumbs down our public schools.  Children need to have command of basic menu of facts, a basic grasp of grammar, reading and  arithematic.  Students do not suffer a net loss when the are compelled to do something that is intellectually unpleasant--it builts the will and often remedies important deficits in body of knowledge at the student's command.  Cultural Literacy  by E.D. Hirsch is an excellent read on this topic.

    Play, without more, is no substitute. I think the amount of time today's students spend on the internet or watching TV should be of more concern than busy work.  There is no doubt that these media have a detrimental effect on attention spans.  I even notice the effect on myself, and literally have to do a series of mental tricks to slow down my mind for dense reading aften having spent excessive time on the internet.

  14. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    No complaints with you here. But where do you put Maria Montessori and John Dewey within this context?

  15. Nickny79 profile image70
    Nickny79posted 8 years ago

    Hirsch proposed that anti-knowledge theories of education prevalent in America (and indicative of John Dewey's educational philosophy) are not only the cause of America's lackluster educational performance as compared to other industrialized nations, but also a cause of widening inequalities in class and race.  Every American child should have to master a specific canon of knowledge and should read a specific canon of literature, i.e. cultural literacy, and specifically Western Cultural literacy.  This means a certain amount of memorization is called for, not just the development of "skill sets."  The bottom line is that there needs to be a balance of substantive knowledge (facts) and procedural knowledge (skills).  When a child is young and their memories are malleable, the focus should be on substantive knowledge.  As the individual matures, more emphasis should be given to procedural knowledge and more latitude should be given to allow students to choose areas that are of special interest to them--but only after the foundation has been laid.  To the extent that Dewey and Montessori disagree with this, is the extent to which I believed their education theories are flawed.

  16. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    I still don't have a huge complaint with the meat of what you are saying.  However, I feel like very bright kids of any age may suffer with wrote memorization and skill sets. To that extent, I do differ.  And that is not anti-knowledge, but pro-intellectual.  Also, I do believe it is possible that all (or most) kids may be gifted--that we simply do not know or have the ability to enable them to draw this out.  ..This based on a book by--.I cannot remember the author--a man who was classified as 'learning disabled" himself and became a relatively famous educator--anyway, you'd hate him, I'd sure; extremely left-leaning.

    Also differ on the fact that of course more than Western culture should be emphasized, or we will be at a loss in an increasingly cross cultural society.



    This is interesting--just published by Teresa:  http://hubpages.com/hub/Ending-the-Madn … -Back-Home

  17. Teresa McGurk profile image62
    Teresa McGurkposted 8 years ago

    Yeah, I think Hirsch is largely correct.  It harms no one to memorize by rote when the brain is best able to retain the information.  How many older folk can recite poems they learned in school? 

    Education should be as broad a mixing of different styles and approaches as possible in any given environment.  We were able to wander by the river and learn about botany.  Kids who live in London can go to the Victoria and Albert.  Some kids have different learning styles, and shouldn't be punished by teachers who don't understand that the kid is perfectly capable of understanding the information if it is presented appropriately.  But still, if a student is 23 and otherwise of sound mind and body, but cannot form cogent sentences in English, we have let her down by not pushing them on her when she was younger.

    By the time I was eighteen I had probably the equivalent of a BA in English, French, and Spanish -- or at least would have placed as a senior in an American university. All that means is that I read more at a younger age, that's all.

  18. Teresa McGurk profile image62
    Teresa McGurkposted 8 years ago

    Honestly?  The bottom line is this: we are letting our kids down if we don't demand more from them in terms of homework and school work.  We are also letting them down if we don't let them play.  We are letting them down if we don't take any opportunity possible to combine play and learning -- injecting humor whenever possible.  But if we concentrate on fun methods rather than sound content, we are losing sight of our main responsibility to our kids.

  19. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    Teresa--
    Agree with that, yes, and don't differ that much with Nick.  But of course within the arts, and for those gifted in these areas (and sometimes these talents manifest early)--much learning can and has been construed even by certified teachers as 'play.'  Or not worthy due to the emphasis on 'basics,' 'standards,' '4 R's,' or whatever conservative euphemism is in vogue at the moment. The arts simply are a somewhat different mode.

    Absolutely agree as far as the demand on what kids do and what they should accomplish.  Video games and the internet (play, these days) I feel are directly responsible for the lack of concentration--and probably achievement--I think we are seeing.  I cannot say too much, for they are not my kids, but my BF's two boys will be lucky to actually graduate due to a combination of lack of necessary demand on what is required of them and literally, WOW (World of Warcraft).  Sad.

  20. Teresa McGurk profile image62
    Teresa McGurkposted 8 years ago

    Hey Lita, sorry it took me a while to see your point (I was too busy ranting, I'm afraid!).  The Arts have indeed been somehow ostracized within the school systems, with funding being cut there before other areas.  This is sad.

    And as for World of Warcraft -- the title says it all, doesn't it?  If it's any comfort, though, my dad dropped out of school because he was more interested in playing soccer and goofing off.  That landed him into a small engineering company that apprenticed him and he loved it.  So maybe the BF's kids will find something that they can excel at and hopefully love.

  21. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    LOL, Teresa.  Maybe it's an Irish thing (I'm kidding)!  A line of 'Dougans' here.

    Did you like or hate Angela's Ashes, btw?

    1. Teresa McGurk profile image62
      Teresa McGurkposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Angela's bleeding ashes!  LOL, dreadful stuff!

  22. britneydavidson profile image59
    britneydavidsonposted 8 years ago

    i think its really neccessary..i think kids remember indirectly than the direct reading.thats the knwn as practicles...this pyhsical things fit first in the mind before the direct reading.

  23. pebbles29 profile image53
    pebbles29posted 8 years ago

    Play is the highest expression of human development. i remember what my professor told us a week ago "play is not a break from learning, it is a way children learn." smile that's why i'm really bothered about my nephew who is really not into playing with other children, he grows up to be an insecure child. sad

  24. profile image0
    Wadey101mposted 8 years ago

    Just think of nurseries, they play and they learn from it. They don't sit down in a classroom with a teacher. All they can really do is play, it's evident that you do learn from playing, as nurseries use this to the full effect. By hosting certain activities, the child will pick up the skills. And by teaching the child through play, where they are enjoying the experience, then the child has a better chance of developing an interest for that skill. For example a child who has fun baking cookies at nursery, has learnt the basic skill (evident by telling mummy and daddy how to do it at home :-) and may develop an interest in cookery.

  25. dineane profile image78
    dineaneposted 8 years ago

    a really simplistic example....

    A long time ago, I taught Microsoft Office applications to elementary school teachers. Most of them had never, well, at least seldom, touched a computer, and they were all tired from their work day and resented having to be in my class. (In fact, teachers were some of the worst students I ever had! But that's a different subject.)

    I regularly used an exercise of playing Solitaire on the first day of class to teach them to use the mouse. It worked.

    I don't remember much of what I had to memorize in school. I do remember at least parts of some of the Saturday morning songs on t.v. like Conjunction Junction....and that one about the Bill on Capitol Hill, from Schoolhouse Rock. And for the record, I graduated Valedictorian, my B.A. is in English Literature, and I have a Masters in Information Science. I *can* memorize if I have to, it just doesn't stick with me very long.

    I've always appreciated being able to "find" the information more than "remembering" the information. Especially now that I'm getting old and more and more dyslexic - I can't dial a phone number on a regular phone anymore for the life of me, even if I'm staring at it on a piece of paper in between pressing buttons....thank goodness I can cut-'n-paste in the soft phone I use for work!

    My daughter is much more articstically inclined and less traditionally "acadmically" gifted than I was. On the other hand, she was reading and starting to write long before she entered kindergarten and encountered her first frustrations with homework. Every single day, they had to write their full names over and over. She was BORED beyond belief in kindergarten, but I could not get the school system to move her ahead to first grade. The habits she developed then - of daydreaming and entertaining herself while the teacher repeated simple instructions over and over for her classmates - have never really gone away. I admit she's somewhat undisciplined in traditional study habits, and her grades reflect that, but I'm not sure what else I was supposed to do back then to help. The closer she gets to graduation, the more I hope that the social skills she has developed (which far exceed those I had at her age!) will serve her better than my "book smarts" have served me.

  26. chitthulamin profile image52
    chitthulaminposted 8 years ago

    Yes,It is right.I agree with you.Do you have any idea for kids to playing games for studying?

  27. LRobbins profile image79
    LRobbinsposted 8 years ago

    Playing is also important for adults, which we forget sometimes.  I instruct adult education classes part time and always try and incorporate at least one game into a class.  One of my favourites is using Pictionary as a way to review concepts just studied.  The students love it and learn something while doing it.

 
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