What about palmistry? Does it predict future correctly?

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  1. profile image0
    PhenomWriterposted 6 years ago

    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/5771536_f248.jpg
    "Palmistry is in some ways more scientific than some other divination methods. It is a close relative to phrenology, which I've read is still (quietly) used by some law enforcement agencies. According to the palmist Chiero, the lines on the hand are created by nerve impulses from the brain."

    Did you believe that?

    1. CyclingFitness profile image91
      CyclingFitnessposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I struggle to beleive that our future life is governed by what the grooves on our hands show.

      You believe in what you choose to however I feel those that believe in such a principle are rather naieve

    2. mathsciguy profile image60
      mathsciguyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The trick to identifying pseudoscience, or "false" science (of course, palmistry doesn't claim to be "science" in a strict sense, but does claim to be a system of determining pertinent information) is not to have a readily available explanation for the phenomenon produced, but rather to be able to actually demonstrate that a phenomenon even exists.
      In other words, don't discount palmistry just because you can't imagine HOW the grooves in your hands could possibly tell about events in your life; discount palmistry because there is really no statistical evidence whatsoever that the grooves in your hands even DO tell anything about events in your life.

    3. couturepopcafe profile image60
      couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The lines on the hand are a manifestation of how we have lived and therefore an indication of the direction our lives will continue to go.  It's not set in stone and we can change our direction.  No real mystery, just good old-fashioned body reading.

      Just like the lines on one's face indicate the nature/attitude of your life in general, or reading the iris of the eye to determine a possible health issue/blockage, so IMO is reading lines on the palms.

    4. Abhaque Supanjang profile image79
      Abhaque Supanjangposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Palmistry is scientific. It is such the notes of someone and the life that he has passed or he will (it can be seen from his left or right hand lines. The scientific side of the palmistry is, the generalization on certain type of lines owned by several people, being got from the years, hundreds of years, even thousands of years observation. But one thing that we have to remember is  never believe the prediction of our palmistry fully, especially the bad ones. Whatever our palm say about our life, as long as we stay alive, we are given chance to change everything on us. Never give up to the prediction. 

      http://s4.hubimg.com/u/5809699_f248.jpg

    5. TFScientist profile image86
      TFScientistposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Short answer - no. There is no scientific evidence that this method of divination has any validity (or any method of divination for that matter). I will be swayed when a double blind trial of decent sample size shows an effect trustworthy above the 95% confidence level.

  2. formosangirl profile image81
    formosangirlposted 6 years ago

    I first studied palmistry when I was just a young girl because we owned a book. I was so fascinated with it that I even looked into archived books at the Library of Congress. But then I became to busy and never followed through. What I find fascinating is when they looked at the hands of criminals.

    I have a mystical cross on both palms. When I was younger I had premonitions. I look at others' hands and they don't have it. I have always been on the spiritual side, using my intuition and relying on my senses. Incidentally, my father also had a mystical cross and perhaps it explains why we had the book at our home.

    I also enjoying "reading" people (not their palms) and trying to figure them out. My biggest fixation in college was asking what makes a person tick. I would have gone into psychology had I discovered it much soon but by the time I did I was already a double major.

    I haven't thought about palmistry in a while. I guess predicting the future is not so important to me when I am trying to stay focus on the present moment.

 
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