Would There Be A Reason For Concern?

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  1. Cagsil profile image81
    Cagsilposted 6 years ago

    Hey Hubbers,

    My question is most likely going to be in the category of neuroscience which is something I know nothing about.

    Having said that, my question is Would there be a reason for concern for a person who doesn't remember dreams?

    This just came across my mind and elected to start a forum on it. Feel free to weigh in.

    1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
      MelissaBarrettposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Nope... just means he/she doesn't rise quickly enough from REM sleep to theta sleep for the subconscious and conscious to meet smile

      Seriously... it means that delta stage of sleep is slightly longer coming out of REM sleep than in most people.  In most cases not dangerous in the least.

      *edit... That is making the assumption that all else is normal and all stages of sleep are reached.  You did say doesn't remember instead of doesn't dream.

      1. Cagsil profile image81
        Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Well, if one cannot remember any of their dreams, then how would they know that they had a dream(s)?

        1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
          MelissaBarrettposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          sleep study smile  Lots of neat gluey spikey probes stuck to your head and the rest of your body in a strange room with people watching you all night... This-of  course- leads to optimum sleeping conditions and a true read on your normal sleep patterns smile

          1. Cagsil profile image81
            Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            I figured it would be something like that. wink

  2. Mighty Mom profile image82
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Allow me to be the first non-neuroscientist to weigh in on this fascinating forum topic!
    It could indicate that the person in question is waking from restful sleep, of which dreams are not a part.
    On the other hand, the person could be really, really repressed.
    Or passed out.
    smile

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Mighty Mom. Always nice to hear your thoughts. smile lol

  3. Shanna11 profile image91
    Shanna11posted 6 years ago

    I don't mean to hijack your thread, but I wonder if the opposite is also cause for concern-- remembering every single one of your dreams? I remember almost all of my mine very clearly, no matter when I wake up. But I also sleepwalk and sleeptalk several nights a month, so I'm already mentally wired wrong...

    1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
      MelissaBarrettposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      *Grins* Actually it just means you are waking more often.  People with sleep apnea  have this problem so yeah it might be slightly more dangerous for you.

      *edit... not a neurologist or anything professional...  Just something I've had cause to look into a lot... (two sleep walkers and a hubbie on cpap at night)

      1. Cagsil profile image81
        Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Good to know. smile

  4. SandyMcCollum profile image75
    SandyMcCollumposted 6 years ago

    I stopped remembering any dreams for two decades, when I was smoking a lot of pot. I thought maybe the weed stopped my dreaming, or made me not remember it somehow. I mean, YEARS and YEARS went by before I cleaned up by habits and now I have dreams again all the time. So I'm sure it's the weed.

    Oh, to answer your question, I see no need for concern, but maybe there is something suppressing this person's dreaming?

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Sandy, it was just a random thought. I was curious to find out if there would be a reason to be concerned. But, thank you for the input. smile

  5. Shadesbreath profile image84
    Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago

    I think the real concern is semi-memory or dream-fleeting in the technical speak. This is best exemplified in those dreams we all surely have where there are fields filled with hot and worshipful maidens bowing to you as you stand upon the mountain top. You can feel their adoration and lust as their eyes nearly burn you up with the carnal and, in many instances, nearly violent sexual thoughts they project upon you, and, just as you begin to start making your selections for said projections the dream gets interrupted and you wake; you remember it for that scant few minutes after, the visions there, concrete yet dissolving in a panicked sense of "OMG, Noooo!", you even vow to get back to it, trying to force yourself back to sleep to resume, but then, somehow, you do sleep, but that dream is lost and you never get to experience the oh-so-real experience of fertilizing so many comely young wombs, etc. You remembered AND forgot all for the same dream.

    That, to my mind, is the most lamentable state of memory and dreams, that middle place, of remembering and then, alas, not.

    As I'm sure we've all shared this same dream, I thought, in the interest of science, it was worth sharing.

    1. Shanna11 profile image91
      Shanna11posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I always get the fields of creepy, gawky thirty year olds. Dang it....

      1. Shadesbreath profile image84
        Shadesbreathposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        You need to reduce your fiber intake, and you can fix that right up.

    2. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      lol lol lol lol
      Good to know. smile
      Not ever in my life have I ever had a dream of that manner. Not once. But, it was a great laugh. tongue lol

      1. Shadesbreath profile image84
        Shadesbreathposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Well, there is always hope. Try to concentrate more when you go to sleep.

        1. Cagsil profile image81
          Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          lol lol

    3. Mighty Mom profile image82
      Mighty Momposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I can honestly report I have never had that dream.
      Should I be concerned?
      lol

      1. Shadesbreath profile image84
        Shadesbreathposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        No need for concern, I just feel sorry for you. It's a really awesome dream.

        1. profile image63
          logic,commonsenseposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          and I'm pretty disappointed I didn't get an invite to that dream!  You have heard of sharing haven't you!  smile

          1. Cagsil profile image81
            Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            lol lol

  6. Mighty Mom profile image82
    Mighty Momposted 6 years ago

    Seriously, sleep apnea is not a joke and if you concerns, get it checked out.

    Although I personally suspect sleep apne may be the "bipolar disorder" of the 2000s in that it seems to be a hot medical topic whenever I go to the doctor. Perhaps it's that they have this fancy dancy sleep lab and need a steady supply of guinea pigs (er, I mean patients) undergoing sleep testing to justify the expense.

    Meanwhile, my problem is the opposite. I wish I could forget my dreams!
    *shudders*

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Me too. I hate my dreams. Last night was an unending dream involving conan obrien, it was pretty bad. Seemed to last for hours

    2. Shanna11 profile image91
      Shanna11posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Last night I was convinced there were multiple snakes in my bed (and I do mean reptiles, not men! tongue) from the reptile shows I do at work.

      I'm going crazy because I was more worried the snakes would die without their heating lamps, then the fact that there were possibly slithery serpents in my bed.

  7. Melissa A Smith profile image99
    Melissa A Smithposted 6 years ago

    Concern? I don't think so, it's rather normal. Every now and then one just 'sticks' for me, but they are really easy to forget once you get out of that state. My mind kind of goes wacky in REM sleep, it's another world.

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you. smile

  8. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 6 years ago

    There might be a concern if you stopped having dreams when you had them before. Stroke, meds, a mental condition maybe

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Good to know.

  9. Vellur profile image91
    Vellurposted 6 years ago

    No reason for concern. It just means you are a good sleeper who does not take all your worries along when you go to sleep?? Or you must be a deep sleeper. Good you don't have dreams. I have scary one's and I get up sweating at times in the night.

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Hey Vellur, nice to see you in the forums. This isn't about me. It's just a random thought that I wanted to share with others to see what they had to say.

      Yes, I have good night sleep though. I've learned to train myself when my head hits the pillow to review my day, as in basic live it over again in my mind and look for things which I know I saw, but didn't focus on at the time.

      It's a cool trick to release stress before sleep. wink

  10. wltw profile image77
    wltwposted 6 years ago

    It's the dreams we have when we're awake that keep us going. Freud's theory is that dreams are unconscious wishes but I think he drank his own bathwater. I think what we interpret as "dreams" is just the mind going over recent events and then sorting out the good from the bad and committing the former to long term memory and the latter to New Jersey. If you want to start remembering your dreams keep a pad and pencil by the bed and the instant you wake up start writing. Over time, this triggers the "better late than never reflex" in the medulla oblingata and soon you'll be spouting your dreams to everyone which might not be a good idea. I know nothing about neuroscience either, I'm running on imagination like you.

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your input. smile

  11. Shawn May Scott profile image61
    Shawn May Scottposted 6 years ago

    Have your friend try a small amount of Clarey Sage on a cotton ball and place it near the bed. That will not only bring on dreams if no dreams are occurring but it will help with remembering all or parts of a dream when waking. Also sleep depth and quality depend on the persons state of exhaustion. If we are far too tired then we do not sleep well as we pass out or drop from the need to sleep. Sleep should be something that we ease into peacefully and our dreaming minds can take over. If this person is over 40 (or close to) have them get their B12 level checked that can affect all kinds of body fucntions including sleep and the ability to reach REM sleep. Good luck and I wish you and your friend well!!! smile

    1. Cagsil profile image81
      Cagsilposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I appreciate your input also. smile

 
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