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Why is the movie always different from the book?

  1. Efficient Admin profile image92
    Efficient Adminposted 5 years ago

    Why is the movie always different from the book?

    Have you ever read a good book, and then they make a movie out of the book, but it's always different from the book? Why do they do that?

  2. LCDWriter profile image94
    LCDWriterposted 5 years ago

    Because the movies would be ten hours long if they didn't edit it! :-)

    1. Efficient Admin profile image92
      Efficient Adminposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That makes sense!

  3. billybuc profile image88
    billybucposted 5 years ago

    It always seems to be so, doesn't it?  The closest adaptation I have ever seen was "To Kill A Mockingbird."

  4. cre8ivOne profile image76
    cre8ivOneposted 5 years ago

    As people are saying, they can't fit every detail into a 2 hour movie.  Very often the books withstand the test of being the better version, however, I can tell you there are a few movies that were just as good as the books; The Help, is one example and I also really enjoyed The Notebook movie far more than the book, even with the changed ending.

  5. Rod Marsden profile image75
    Rod Marsdenposted 5 years ago

    Sometimes it is the need to fit the movie into an hour and a half to 2 and a half hours at the most time slot. Sometimes it is the audience one is aiming for.

    They butchered The Blue Max when they made the book into a movie. They couldn't have the hero just fade away as an alcoholic. They had to kill him off instead. Apparently audiencesd of the day would accept one rather than the other or so the makers of the film thought at the time.

  6. IDONO profile image83
    IDONOposted 5 years ago

    One reason is there are no boundaries to your imagination when reading a book but are limited to what's possible to put on screen. e.g. The Shining.
         Also, your interpretation of a book may be different from that of the movie producer.
         And there is the practical reason. It may be just too expensive to create on screen, (settings, props and actors),what is in the book. So it's altered to fit a budget. Movies are made for profit.

    1. ladydeonne profile image79
      ladydeonneposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      IDONO,

      I agree with your assessment.  As an avid reader, I enjoy using my imagination in following the author's train of thought and the plot of the story.   I like that I can envision how the characters look and feel.  The movies disappoint.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image75
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with much of what you have said. Not so sure about expense. There was a time when, to show thousands of Crusaders on the march meant thousands of extras. Nowadays you could get by with a hundred and the computer buffs make up the rest.

 
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