What is one book you think everyone should read?

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  1. GiblinGirl profile image84
    GiblinGirlposted 5 years ago

    What is one book you think everyone should read?

  2. Ms Dee profile image86
    Ms Deeposted 5 years ago

    "Islam Uncensored" by Jeff King. It is an eye-opener to our current world situation, the reality of which we westerners do not correctly grasp.

    1. GiblinGirl profile image84
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I haven't heard of that one, but I'll have to check it out.  It actually sounds like something my husband might also like to read, thanks.

    2. Ms Dee profile image86
      Ms Deeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Very good. Warning, the first chapter is a bit of a slog, but the whole book is quite enlightening.

    3. Peter Allison profile image82
      Peter Allisonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Really? It's all about Islam, by umm, Jeff King? Before Shakespeare? Before Moby Dick? Dostoevsky? The Bible? The Koran?

  3. profile image0
    Motown2Chitownposted 5 years ago

    'To Kill a Mockingbird'

    What equality looks like through the eyes of a child. 

    We could all learn a LOT about how to be better human beings.

    1. GiblinGirl profile image84
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's one of my FAVORITE books.  I read it years ago and loved it.

    2. nishlaverz profile image60
      nishlaverzposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've never got passed the first chapter. Even when I had to read it at school I couldn't. However I've always wanted to read it as I love the film.

    3. Rebecca2904 profile image77
      Rebecca2904posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is such a great book! Great recommendation!

  4. Twilight Lawns profile image82
    Twilight Lawnsposted 5 years ago

    Why limit it to just one book?‘  Here are  some of my suggestions:
    ‘Brideshead Revisited’ by Evelyn Waugh
    ‘East of Eden’ by John Steinbeck
    ‘Theophilus North’ by Thornton Wilder
    ‘The Bridge of San Luis Rey’ by Thornton Wilder
    ‘The Great Gatsby’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee (I agree so much, Motown.  Stunningly beautiful and sad.)
    ‘The Catalyst’ by Angela Jardine
    and of course,
    ‘The Twilight Lawns Chronicles’ by my all time favourite writer, whose name escapes me for the moment.

    1. GiblinGirl profile image84
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for all the suggestions.  I actually read while walking on the treadmill so I go through books pretty quickly.  I love that you included The Great Gatsby - that's truly a classic.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'll go along with To Kill a Mockingbird and The Great Gatsby. Great choices.

  5. Rod Marsden profile image74
    Rod Marsdenposted 5 years ago

    There isn't one single book. I do, however, have a list of ten. They are:
    1. 1984 by George Orwell
    2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    3. Dune by Frank Herbert
    4. The Shape of Things to Come by H. G. Wells
    5. Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne
    6. Ragtime by E. L Doctorow
    7. Making Money by Terry Pratchett
    8. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    9. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    10. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

    These are not in any particular order of excellence since they are all very good and are part of our overall literary history. There really needs to be others. Even ten is far too short a list.

    1. nishlaverz profile image60
      nishlaverzposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I would say that this is a great list of books. I remember The Great Gatsby and To Kill a Mockingbird from my school days. However never managed to finish them. I have an E-book copy of 1984 and love the Dune series of stories.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Glad you approve nushlaverz. High school texts are often only half read at best. Unfortunately, great books do become high school texts.

    3. Conservative Lady profile image73
      Conservative Ladyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great list - I think everyone should read Brave New World - keeps us reminded of how precious our freedoms are.

    4. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You got it Conservative Lady.

  6. profile image0
    Old Empresarioposted 5 years ago

    I would definitely not pick one that has been made into a film. I would say either 'Julian' or 'Creation' by Gore Vidal. The former gives a great insight into the origins of Christianity and the latter gives great insight into the origins of western and eastern philosophies, which all of our societies are based on.

  7. FatFreddysCat profile image98
    FatFreddysCatposted 5 years ago

    "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" series by Douglas Adams. It contains the answer to Life, the Universe, and Everything!

    1. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. This is a great read and a great series of reads. I first came across The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy as a radio play but it started off as a novel. When I read the novel I wasn't disappointed.

  8. Angie Jardine profile image77
    Angie Jardineposted 5 years ago

    Again, there are so many wonderful books it's hard to limit oneself to just one.

    For me it would be 'Cider with Rosie' by Laurie Lee to discover a lost England and the images inspired by its lyrical prose.

    Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy to remind women of the constant importance of women's rights.

    Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons for wonderful humour concerning the eccentricities of the English.

    Cakes and Ale by W. Somerset Maugham for the unexpectedness of the plot and for showing that compassion is not always shown as one would expect.

    And 'A Shropshire Lad' by A.E. Houseman for beautiful, and accessible, poetry.

    However I must admit these are British books by classical British writers ... as such they are not all a 'light' read. They do however, I believe, add to one's understanding of life and its inconsistencies.

    1. Twilight Lawns profile image82
      Twilight Lawnsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      And why am I not surprised?
      You tick all the boxes and then you are so off the wall.
      No wonder I like and admire you.

    2. sarahmoose profile image76
      sarahmooseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have read 'A Shropshire Lad', we had it at school in the library relating to local literature (I'm from Wolverhampton originally), and I loved it. Glad you reminded me of it, I may have to get a copy...

  9. ithabise profile image83
    ithabiseposted 5 years ago

    Strunk & White's "The Elements of Style." Concise...precise...and always worth rereading for the person who endeavors to put pen to paper.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have my own copy of this classic. When it comes to the written language it answers a lot of questions.

  10. GiblinGirl profile image84
    GiblinGirlposted 5 years ago

    Thanks everyone for all the great variety of suggestions.

  11. rlaha profile image69
    rlahaposted 5 years ago

    As some of the other Hubbers said, there isn't just one book that everyone should read. I think people should read all of the classics that are taught in English Literature as well as anything by Shakespeare and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    1. Twilight Lawns profile image82
      Twilight Lawnsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      riaha, after having avoided doing so for ages, I just started reading Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and i am amazed at the man't style, descriptions and the colour he brings to his writing.
      Also, much of the action takes place very close to where I live.

    2. rlaha profile image69
      rlahaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Conan Doyle was very descriptive in his writing. I always enjoyed the Sherlock Holmes series.

    3. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      riaha, I am an Arthur Conan Doyle fan. I love his more obscure works such as The White Company, and Sir Nigel.

    4. sarahmoose profile image76
      sarahmooseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I am currently starting a Conan Doyle anthology of all Sherlock Holmes stories. His writing is amazing.

    5. rlaha profile image69
      rlahaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Rod Marsden.
        Yes, I like Sir Nigel as well. I haven't had the chace to read The White Company but that is next on my list of books to read! smile

      Hi Sarahmoose!
          I agree! His writing is amazing! smile

  12. nishlaverz profile image60
    nishlaverzposted 5 years ago

    If I had to recommend one book it would have to be Arthur C Clark's Against the Fall of Night or as it is also known in it's revised format The City and the Stars.

    I remember Against the Fall of Night this being the first book that I picked up and could not put down. There is also a sequel written by Gregory Benford but I was not is impressed by it.

  13. knighthawk68 profile image60
    knighthawk68posted 5 years ago

    The Bible there has never been a book like it since it has been written and everything in it is true.

  14. NicholasA profile image75
    NicholasAposted 5 years ago

    The Way of the Peaceful Warrior. It is an excellent book and you learn a lot if you really let the messages sink in, instead of just "reading" it.

  15. sarahmoose profile image76
    sarahmooseposted 5 years ago

    I think for me it would have to be 'Mister God, this is Anna' by Fynn (pseudonym of Sydney Hopkins). It is a beautifully written book about a profoundly wise four year old who believes herself to be a personal helper to 'Mister God'. I am not an overtly religious person, but this book captures the beauty of life through the eyes of a child, and how they can see the beauty in things that we as adults often can't. Without giving too much away, the ending is very sad.

    1. GiblinGirl profile image84
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds like it's a very thought-provoking book.

  16. Rebecca2904 profile image77
    Rebecca2904posted 5 years ago

    My favourite books are 'One Day' and 'Me Before You'. Both are so well written and, although they might be tear-jerkers, they also manage to be hilarious most of the way though. Even better, after reading either one you'll be left with an increased love for life and a desire to live every day to the full. Word of warning, 'Me Before You' deals with euthanasia, so if that's a sensitive topic for you in some way then maybe it's best to avoid it.

    My more 'highbrow' literary favourites are 'To Kill a Mockingbird' and the 'Great Gatsby'. My boyfriend recently read '1984' and he said it was one of the best books he's ever read, so perhaps I should suggest that as well.

    1. GiblinGirl profile image84
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the warning about Me Before You. I may check out One Day though.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      When it comes to 1984, Rebecca2904, I agree with your boyfriend.

  17. profile image50
    Giddy Geezerposted 5 years ago

    Since the Bible is already mentioned I would recommend "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger and "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck. A more recent favorite is 'White Oleander" by Janet Fitch. Anything by Maugham will not disappoint but my favorite is "Mrs. Craddock".

    1. GiblinGirl profile image84
      GiblinGirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I love Catcher in the Rye - good suggestion.

    2. Twilight Lawns profile image82
      Twilight Lawnsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger and "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck. but anything by Steinbeck.  They are all good, and Salinger's short stories as well.

  18. anuws profile image60
    anuwsposted 5 years ago

    I would recommend the power of positive thinking (Norman Vincent Peel) and The Secret (Forgot the author's name.)

 
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