How many hours kids should be allowed to play any electronics games

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  1. Lgali profile image58
    Lgaliposted 9 years ago

    How many hours kids should be allowed to play any electronics games e .g DS etc,

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      i think 1 hour is good

  2. febriedethan profile image76
    febriedethanposted 9 years ago

    I used to let my daughter play her video game about an hour but not everyday.

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      so you think 1 hrs is good?

  3. Teresa McGurk profile image61
    Teresa McGurkposted 9 years ago

    Certainly it is a good idea to encourage kids to play outside as well as on the computer or other electronic media.  I suppose a good balance of activities would be ideal -- an hour of play outside, an hour of homework, an hour of electronic games?

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      1hrs each is good time..

  4. Lgali profile image58
    Lgaliposted 9 years ago

    I FIND very difficult to stop them once they start playing

  5. Lgali profile image58
    Lgaliposted 9 years ago

    hend held are better or pC games?

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      any advice?

  6. Capable Woman profile image68
    Capable Womanposted 9 years ago

    0.

    Buy them some books and a baseball glove.

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      they avoid them to read

      1. Capable Woman profile image68
        Capable Womanposted 9 years agoin reply to this

        You mean they avoid reading the books? If so, there are ways to encourage them and make it fun. Also be sure they are the right books for their age, etc. Not too hard or easy.

        If given a choice between video games and a book, I know 99% of kids will pick the video game. Limit the choice to "which book"...or go play outside! smile

        1. Lgali profile image58
          Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

          we buy/borrowlibrary their choice books but still very hard.

          1. Lgali profile image58
            Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

            games are addcited

            1. Lgali profile image58
              Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

              one hour is good per day?

  7. dianacharles profile image70
    dianacharlesposted 9 years ago

    I have seen a BBC program  about how too much of video games causes a certain part of the brain to enlarge and that creates ADD behaviour.They had recommended that parents should keep children younger than 8 away from video games.After that maybe one hour a day. They are too addictive.

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      that true they have warning too but who cares they love so much

    2. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      good to know
      parents should keep children younger than 8 away from video games.

  8. kblover profile image88
    kbloverposted 9 years ago

    Eh, maybe it's just a product of my childhood, but I don't see the need to limit it as long as she's getting everything she needs to do done (schoolwork, any chores/errands, has friends, other activities, etc).

    I was never limited in how long I could play my NES and Gameboy back in the day (waaaaaay back when 8-bit was like OMG! and handheld gaming was like *swoon*) so maybe that's why it sounds so foreign to me.

    Always had a plethora of game systems (and games - my mother loved to watch me play them as I did to play them). Even today I have a PS3, PSP, DS, GameCube, even my SNES is still hooked up.

    *shrug* do what you need to do, though.

    If I were to limit it, maybe 2 hours a day - depends on how much "free time" they have overall.

  9. Lisa HW profile image65
    Lisa HWposted 9 years ago

    I don't think little kids should play them at all; and I think when it comes to older-but-not-high-school kids, parents should kind of set things up in a way that naturally limits how much time they spend on it.  With high-school kids, I think parents should be happy if, for example, their 15-year-old is at home nights, playing video games (or in the house afternoons, playing video games with a friend), rather than hanging out "for all hours".

    With little kids, though, I really think it's important they be encouraged to do other things.  There was a pilot program in my area, and the aim was to see if having kids in the top "x percentile" developmentally mixed in with special needs kids.  My daughter was admitted as one of the non-special needs kids.  At a parents' meeting I was amazed when the mother of a special needs child said she "couldn't stop him" from spending too much time on video games.  She asked if that was everyone else's problem too.  I didn't know what to say because the only one I had playing video games was my 12-year-old son, and I paid attention to how much he played as well.  The other mothers of the non-special-needs kids were pretty much like I was.  I can't help but thinking that says something about little kids and video games.

    1. Lgali profile image58
      Lgaliposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      very nicely said

 
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